Utilization of Blast-Furnace Slag and Silica Fume for Controlling Temperature Rise in High-Strength Concrete

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Title: Utilization of Blast-Furnace Slag and Silica Fume for Controlling Temperature Rise in High-Strength Concrete

Author(s): Mashiro Yurugi, Toshiaki Mizobuchi, and Toshinari Terauchi

Publication: Special Publication

Volume: 132

Issue:

Appears on pages(s): 1433-1450

Keywords: blast furnace slag; compressive strength; high-strength concretes; mortars (material); fineness; silica fume; temperature; thermal stresses; Materials Research

Date: 5/1/1992

Abstract:
In the case of high-strength concrete, the problem of temperature rise due to hydration is compounded, where the unit cement content is much higher than that encountered in normal concrete. This study was carried out to determine whether the merits of slag and silica fume addition could be combined to develop a low-heat high-strength concrete, in which the heat generation can be controlled by blending the cementitious constituents, keeping the compressive strength about 80 MPa (at 91 days). The program was divided into two phases, using mortar in the first phase to study the effect of partial replacement of cement by slags of varying fineness and silica fume on the consistency, temperature rise, and strength development. It was found that, from an overall point of view, a blend of cement, slag, and silica fume in proportions of 2:7:1, using a slag with 6000 cm²/g by Blaine, yields the best result. Concrete specimens were then cast in the second phase, using the mix of cement just mentioned, and it was verified that the temperature rise could be brought down by as much as 30 C without adversely affecting the strength at 91 days (about 80 Mpa), though the early age strength was slightly lower.