Concrete Projects Past Winners

Concrete Projects Past Winners

2018

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1st Place: The Effect of Rock Wool and Curing on Some Properties of Ferrocement Mortar
Authors: Aseel Sami Najaf and Safa Jasim Khudhair, University of Technology, Iraq
Faculty Advisor: Asst. Lecturer, Ziyad Majeed Abed
2nd Place: Properties of High-Strength Self-Compacting Concrete (HSSCC) Containing Waste Ceramic Powders as Supplementary Cementitious Material
Authors: Abdullah Karim Mohammed and Eman Ibrahim Faris, Iraq University College
Faculty Advisor: Asst. Lecturer, Ahmed Nasrat Mohammed
3rd Place: Behavior of Self-Compacting Concrete Produced from Recycled Aggregate
Authors: Qasim J. Salim and Younis Y. Younis, Northern Technical University
Faculty Advisor: Asst. Professor, Dr. Eethar Thanon Dawood

2017

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1st Place: Full Design & Implementation Drawings of 3 Reinforced Concrete Units             
Authors: Ramah M. Khalil and Khaled M. Fodail, Alexandria University
Faculty Advisor: Dr. Zaki I. Mahmoud
2nd Place: The Effect of Lightweight Materials on Properties of Cement Mortar  
Author: Yasser Sattar Hassan, University of Technology
Faculty Advisor: Asst. Lecturer Ziyad Majeed Abed
3rd Place: Evaluation of Punching Shear Strength Models of Interior and Edge Slab Column Connections Reinforced with GFRP Bars
Author: Jordan Keith Carrette, University of Manitoba
Faculty Advisor: Dr. Ehab El-Salakawy, P. Eng.

2016

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1st Place: Comparative Study of Immediate Deflection Calculation of Partially Prestressed Concrete Flexural Members
Author: Mitchell Young, University of New Brunswick
Faculty Advisor: Dr. Peter Bischoff
2nd Place: Improving Consolidation of Concrete with Large Aggregates in Columns Integrated with Masonry Walls for Structures in Developing Countries
Author: Eunice Leung, Pratt School of Engineering, Duke University
Faculty Advisor: Joseph Nadeau
3rd Place: Manufacturing of Eco-Cement Mortar Composites
Authors: Majd Janan Kamel and Alhasan Emad Mousa, University of Technology, Baghdad, Iraq
Faculty Advisor: Asst. Prof. Dr. Maan S. Hassan

2012

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1st Place: Optimization of Concrete for Storage of Spent Nuclear Fuel
Author: Lieutenant David Junta and Lieutenant Charles Briseno, United States Military Academy
Faculty Advisor: Dr. Christopher Conley and Colonel Fred Meyer
2nd Place: Library Building Design
Author: Sean Wonderlich, Kansas State University
Faculty Advisor: Kimberly Waggle Kramer
3rd Place: Report on Design of Foundation for a High Rise Building
Author: Jingyu Lee, Illinois Institute of Technology
Faculty Advisors: Martin Klaeschen

2011

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1st Place: Analysis of Test Results for Evaluation of Alternative Resistance Mechanisms for Disproportionate Collapse
Author: Todd Allen Witt and Russell Urban Voss, University of Missouri
Faculty Advisor: Dr. Sarah Orton, Ph.D., P.E.
2nd Place: Alternative Test Methods for Evaluating Pozzolanic Effect of Fly Ash in Concrete
Author: Ardavan Amirchoupani, University of Toronto
Faculty Advisor: Doug Hooton
3rd Place: Serviceability and Elastic Behavior of Alkali-Activated Fly Ash Concrete
Author: Nicholas Mascitelli, Villanova University
Faculty Advisors: Aleksandra Radlinska and Joseph Yost

2010

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1st Place: Modulus of Elasticity and Mechanical Behavior of Ultra-High-Performance Concrete
Author: Cadets Mainor E. Bojorquez, David T. Carlson, and Alexander J. Vanhout, United States Military Academy, West Point, New York
Faculty Advisors: Lieutenant Colonel Karl F. Meyer and Dr. Christopher Conley
Abstract: The purpose of this study was to determine the modulus of elasticity (MOE) of ultra-high-performance concretes (UHPC). This included identifying any trends and behaviors that were different between UHPC and standard strength concrete. This research consisted of performing compression strength and modulus of elasticity tests on 2 in. cubes, and cylinders including sizes 2 x 4, 3 x 6, 4 x 8, and 6 x 12 in. (50 x 101, 76 x 152, 101 x 203, and 152 x 304 mm). The cylinders were cast with Cor-Tuf, developed by the Army Engineer Research and Development Center (ERDC), and Ductal, a proprietary material produced by The Lafarge Company. Both forms of UHPC were tested with and without steel fibers. The most significant finding was that the MOE ceased to increase with increasing strength in the UHPC cylinders, and instead hit a ceiling and leveled off, showing even a slight decreasing trend. This finding suggested that at compressive strengths encountered with UHPC, the MOE characteristics may begin to behave more like that of steel, with a single common value, and less like that of standard concrete. It was also found that as specimen size increased, MOE increased slightly. Further, increased unit weight correlated with increased MOE; following this trend, samples with steel fibers tended to be denser and had higher MOE values. The reasons for the differences in behavior between UHPC and normal concretes include careful selection of particle sizes, pozzolanic reactions coupled with a special curing regimen, and improved microcracking behavior. It was found that the most consistent MOE results came from 4 x 8 cylinders; 3 x 6 cylinders produced slightly less consistent results, and 6 x 12 cylinders showed broad scatter.
2nd Place: Toughness and Toughness Index Evaluation of Steel Fiber Reinforced Concrete for Repairing Works in Hydraulic Structures
Author: Prabhanjan B. Wagh College of Engineering Pune Maharashtra, India
Faculty Advisor: Ishwar P. Sonar
3rd Place: Cast-in-Place Low Density Cellular Concrete
Author: Alex Bertheau Arizona State University Tempe, Arizona
Faculty Advisor: Luke M. Snell

2009

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1st Place:Experiment Work and an Analytical Investigation on Shear Strength of High-Performance Concrete Beams with Web Reinforcement
Author: Jignesh I. Patel
Faculty Advisor: Himat T. Solanki
Abstract: This paper presents theoretical investigation on the shear strength of high-performance concrete (HPC) beams with web reinforcement. This investigation involves a development of a theory based on the simplified shear design method by using the stress theory with a softened truss model. The study was carried out by considering several parameters, including concrete covers, web and longitudinal tensile steel ratios, overall beam depths, shear span-depth ratio, and concrete strength. The theoretical study was verified with the results of 133 beams previously published in the literature. A comparison of shear strength was made with the proposed theory and predictions by the shear design provisions outlined in IS 456:2000, ACI 318-05, and EC2 Part I. From comparison, it was found that the IS 456:2000 Code resulted in a more conservative prediction for HPC beams while in ACI 318-05 and EC2 Part I, the results were also conservative but may be adopted for the safe design of HPC beams. To validate the proposed theory, four additional tests were conducted to examine the effect on the variation of longitudinal reinforcement ratio due to a two-point load. Concrete with a compressive strength of approximately 6810 and 7090 psi (47 and 49 MPa) was used in the beam specimen. Experimental results indicated that shear strength can be affected by the variation of the longitudinal reinforcement ratio. The shear span-depth ratio (a/d) of 1.51 and the shear reinforcement ratio (pt) of 0.20% were used in all beam specimens. The actual shear strength of each beam specimen was compared with the shear strength predicted using the provisions of ACI 318-05 and EC2 Part I. Based on experimental results, the shear strength increases with increases in longitudinal reinforcement ratio.
2nd Place: Marine Biofouling and its Implications on the Durability of Concrete Sea Defences
Author: Peter Hughes
Faculty Advisor: Don Fairhurst
3rd Place: Human Hair-Reinforced Concrete
Author: Yonathan Reches
Faculty Advisor: Dr. Thomas Kang

2008

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1st Place: Developing a Novel pH Buffer Methodology to Inhibit Concrete Corrosion
Author: Michael J. Loy
Faculty Advisor: Rosa Hemphill
Abstract: Concrete deterioration costs billions of dollars each year in the U.S. in repair, replacement, and environmental impact. The major cause of deterioration is corrosion of steel reinforcing bar in concrete that occurs when concrete pH is reduced by high acidic attack or when chloride ions penetrate concrete, destroying the natural passivation layer surrounding reinforcing bar. This innovative study developed a pH buffer methodology to maintain a high pH environment to protect reinforcing bar's passivating layer from acidic and chloride corrosion. Previous studies and mitigation strategies have focused on creating additional passivation layers or developing coatings, sealants, or coverings for concrete to inhibit corrosion. Sodium borate and sodium carbonate-based buffers, both highly alkaline and nonchloride, were mixed into concrete by replacing the mixing water with 25%, 50%, and 100% concentrations of each buffer, then compared against a non-buffered control. Samples were placed in a 100% carbon dioxide chamber to accelerate acidic corrosion attack and immersed in a 2M sodium chloride solution to accelerate chloride corrosion. The effects of pH buffers on compressive strength, pH levels, half-cell potential, flowability, air content, and reinforcing bar surface were studied. Results indicated that pH buffers maintained high pH and reduced probability of corrosion with sodium borate at 50%—the most effective buffer solution. It exceeded the control in compressive strength, maintained consistently high pH, and tested second-best in low probability of acidic and chloride corrosion with moderate flowability. The study supported an efficient, cost-effective nontoxic buffer methodology to extend the service life of concrete, improve durability, and promote a sustainable environment.
2nd Place: The Use of Mexican Natural Pozzolans for Preventing Corrosion in Reinforced Mortar Specimens: A Laboratory Study
Author: José Pacheco
Faculty Advisors: Gerardo Fajardo San Miguel and Pedro L. Valdez Tamez
3rd Place: The Use of Macro-synthetic Fibre-Reinforced Concrete
Author: Peter Hughes
Faculty Advisor: C.J. Hill

2007

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1st Place: Designing and Analyzing a New Shrinking Reducing Admixture for Concrete
Author: Michael J. Loy
Advisor: Rosa Hemphill
Abstract: Concrete is the most widely used building material in the world. The challenge for construction engineers is to design durable concrete, which does not crack. While chemical air-entraining admixtures (AEA) are added to concrete to reduce cracking from the freeze/thaw process, AEA increase shrinkage which results in cracking, thus prompting the addition of shrinking-reducing admixtures (SRA), which have an effect on concrete properties. The goal of this project was to design a new, effective, non-toxic RA superior at reducing shrinkage because of its low surface tension. A dipropylene glycol-based SRA was formulated by the student, mixed with AEA into concrete, then analyzed against two established SRA-AEA combinations for effects on rate of shrinkage, compressive strength, air void quality and air content. Surface tension, slump and unit weight tests were also conducted. Results indicated that lower surface tension correlated to lower rates of shrinkage by retaining water in the capillaries thus reducing drying shrinkage. Based upon promising results of the student-SRA, future study should analyze the chemical composition and reactions of dipropylene glycol-SRA, without AEA, to reformulate the admixture composition for optimal results.
2nd Place: Rapid Setting Composite Concrete for Blast Protection
Author: Cadets Dan Long, Chip Heidt and Mark Hogan
Advisor: Lieutenant Colonel Karl F. Meyer

2006

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1st Place: Very High Strength Concrete for Blast Protection Designing and Analyzing a New Shrinking Reducing Admixture for Concrete
Author: Cadets Michael Riccitiello, Nicholas Soroka and Andrew Hutchinson
Advisor: LTC Colonel Karl F. Meyer and Dr. Christopher Conley
Abstract: The significance of this research project stems from its contribution to the development of more cost effective solutions for blast and ballistic protection for military and civilian applications. Very High Strength Concrete (VHSC), originally developed at the Engineer Research and Development Center (ERDC) at Vicksburg, Mississippi, has been in existence for over a decade; the applications of the material, for other than structural uses, are in their early stages. There are three major goals of this project. First, to determine the optimum type, size, and proportion of fibers in VHSC for optimizing energy absorption; second, to develop computer models that will assist in predicting the behavior of VHSC; and third, to address the challenges currently associated with preparing and testing VHSC specimens. Finding answers to these questions will help extend current boundaries associated with this technology and, in the end, will hopefully save lives.
2nd Place: Exploration of Cracking and Leakage in Reinforced Concrete Water Retaining Structures
Author: Greg Bergland and Kyle Hampton, Ryerson University, Toronto, ON, Canada
Advisor: Reza Kianoush
3rd Place: Optimizing the Compressive Strengths of Various Recycled Aggregates in Portland Concrete
Author: Michael J. Loy, Oregon Episcopal High School, Portland, OR
Advisor: Bette G. Yada

2005

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1st Place: Lightweight Concrete Modulus of Elasticity
Author: Cadet Eileen Stiffey, United States Military Academy, West Point, New York
Advisor: LTC Colonel Karl F. Meyer
Abstract: This report presents the results of a study conducted to determine a new equation to more accurately predict the modulus of elasticity (MOE) for lightweight concrete. Current equations specified in the ACI 318-Structural Building Code and the ACI 363-Guide for High Strength Concrete are not good predictors of MOE. Results from approximately 500 MOE tests were collected and analyzed in this study. Data was collected based on aggregate type, but was analyzed collectively to determine a new equation that more accurately fits the data. This study considered Dr. Adrian Pauw's research from over 40 years ago that suggested the use of a cube root of the compressive strength versus the currently specified square root. By adjusting the current equations to use a cube root of the compressive strength, and adjusting other terms in the equations, the average percent difference was driven to zero from upwards of 68%. This report proposes a new equation to predict MOE. When compared to the current ACI equations, the proposed equation is a better predictor of MOE as the average percent difference between experimental and predicted values is significantly lower. In addition to proposing a new MOE equation for lightweight concrete, this report also examines the new equation for use on normal weight concrete. The proposed equation did not prove as accurate for use on normal weight concrete. However, with some slight modifications, a more accurate equation for normal weight concrete was also proposed. Further research must be conducted to more thoroughly verify the proposed equation for use on lightweight concrete incorporating all types of lightweight aggregates. It is also necessary to further test the proposed equation against other normal weight data to determine the feasibility that only one equation is accurate for use on both lightweight and normal weight concrete.
2nd Place: Concrete Flatwork Methods
Author: Cory Hart, Southern Illinois University at Edwardsville, Edwardsville, IL
Advisor: Luke M. Snell
3rd Place: Smart Concrete
Author: Ryan Taylor, Southern Illinois University at Edwardsville, Edwardsville, IL
Advisor: Luke M. Snell

2003

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1st Place: Ultimate Flexural Strength of Fiber Reinforced Concrete with Not Randomly Oriented Fibers
Author: Hamed Yazdani, Tehran University, Tehran, Iran
Advisor: Dr. M. Shekarchizadeh
Abstract: Fiber reinforcement is an effective approach to improve flexural behavior of concrete as a brittle material. In a thin section, fiber orientation is not totally random and tends to form a 2-dimensional orientation. The method of slurry infiltrated fibered concrete (SIFCON) was implemented using 160 x 40 x 40 mm specimens. In this research, the ultimate flexural strength of fiber-reinforced concrete in thin sections has been studied. The results showed a significant increase in ultimate flexural strength and fiber efficiency, compared with fiber-reinforced concrete with randomly oriented fibers.
2nd Place: Modulus Study for High Strength, Lightweight Concrete
Author: Cadet Ricardo Garza and Cadet Joshua Sprowls, USMA, West Point, New York
Advisor: LTC Karl F. Meyer and CPT James Hoskin
3rd Place: Superflat Floors in Large Projects in South America
Author: Nicolas Ebensperger, Pontifica Universidad Catolica de Chile, Santiago, Chile
Advisor: Dr. Carlos Videla