Properties of Granulated Blast-Furnace Slag Cement Concrete

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Title: Properties of Granulated Blast-Furnace Slag Cement Concrete

Author(s): K. Sakai, H. Watanabe, M. Suzuki, and K. Hamazaki

Publication: Special Publication

Volume: 132

Issue:

Appears on pages(s): 1367-1384

Keywords: adiabatic conditions; blast furnace slag; carbonation; temperature; compressive strength; concretes; drying shrinkage; freeze-thaw durability; heat of hydration; setting (hardening); slags; Materials Research

Date: 5/1/1992

Abstract:
In Japan, fly ash has been generally used as a material of low-heat cement for mass concrete, such as dams. As an alternative material for low-heat cement, granulated blast furnace slag can be considered. In this study, moderate heat portland cement, in which the fineness is 300 m¦/kg, and granulated blast furnace slag, in which the fineness is 300, 400, 500, and 600 m¦/kg, were made. The slag content in cement is 50, 60, 70, and 80 percent. Tests for setting and heat of hydration in cement, and for setting, compressive strength, freezing and thawing, adiabatic temperature rise, carbonation, and drying shrinkage in concrete, were carried out. The following results were obtained: 1) as the slag content increases, the time of setting increases; 2) the compressive strength of concrete increases with the increase of fineness of slag; 3) concrete with slag has a satisfactory resistance to freezing and thawing; 4) the adiabatic temperature of concrete is affected by the slag content and the fineness; 5) the depth of carbonation increases with the increase of slag content; 6) there is no great difference in drying shrinkage between concretes with slag and fly ash. From the test results, it is concluded that, by properly determining the slag content and fineness, it is possible to manufacture cement with similar or better quality compared to conventional moderate heat fly ash cement.