ABOUT THE INTERNATIONAL CONCRETE ABSTRACTS PORTAL

  • The International Concrete Abstracts Portal is an ACI led collaboration with leading technical organizations from within the international concrete industry and offers the most comprehensive collection of published concrete abstracts.

International Concrete Abstracts Portal

Showing 1-5 of 28 Abstracts search results

Document: 

SP345

Date: 

February 19, 2021

Author(s):

ACI Committee 549

Publication:

Symposium Papers

Volume:

345

Abstract:

Sponsors: ACI Committee 549, Rilem-MCC Editors: Barzin Mobasher and Flávio de Andrade Silva Several state-of-the-art sessions on textile-reinforced concrete/fabric-reinforced cementitious matrix (TRC/FRCM) were organized by ACI Committee 549 in collaboration with RILEM TC MCC during the ACI Fall 2019 Convention in Cincinnati, OH, and the ACI Virtual Technical Presentations in June 2020. The forum provided a unique opportunity to collect information and present knowledge in the field of TRC and FRCM as sustainable construction materials. The term TRC is typically used for new construction applications whereas the term FRCM refers to the repair applications of existing concrete and masonry. Both methods use a textile mesh as reinforcement and a cementitious-based matrix component and, due to high tensile and flexural strength and ductility, can be used to support structural loads. The technical sessions aimed to promote the technology, and document and develop recommendations for testing, design, and analysis, as well as to showcase the key features of these ductile and strong cement composite systems. New methods for characterization of key parameters were presented, and the results were collected towards the development of technical and state-of-the-art papers. Textile types include polymer-based (low and high stiffness), glass, natural, basalt, carbon, steel, and hybrid, whereas the matrix can include cementitious, geopolymers, and lightweight matrix (aggregates). Additives such as short fibers, fillers, and nanomaterials were also considered. The sessions were attended by researchers, designers, students, and participants from the construction and fiber industries. The presence of people with different expertise and from different regions of the world provided a unique opportunity to share knowledge and promote collaborative efforts. The experience of an online technical forum was a success and may be used for future opportunities. The workshop technical sessions chairs sincerely thank the ACI staff for doing a wonderful job in organizing the virtual sessions and ACI TC 549 and Rilem TC MCC for the collaboration.


Document: 

SP-345_15

Date: 

February 1, 2021

Author(s):

Kissila Botelho Goliath, Daniel C. T. Cardoso, and Flavio de A. Silva

Publication:

Symposium Papers

Volume:

345

Abstract:

Textile-reinforced concrete (TRC) is a composite material resulting from the combination of finegrained concrete and textile reinforcement, widely used to strengthen existing structures. In addition, TRC is an alternative to obtain lighter and thinner structures. However, the behavior of these structures depends on the properties of the matrix and fiber used, as well as on the interface between these two phases. In this work, the interface properties of SBR-based carbon textile-reinforced concrete as supplied and after sand-coating treatment are evaluated through pullout tests. Then, to assess the bending behavior of structural members, four-point bending tests were performed on I-section beams using textiles with and without surface treatment. To analyse the evolution of cracking, digital image correlation (DIC) technique was used. The effectiveness of epoxy-sand treatment surface in textile reinforcement improve the bond between textile as well matrix as the failure mode of TRC beams and was confirmed by improved interface properties, i.e. a stiffer and stronger interface was obtained. In addition to the improved crack pattern, it was observed smaller and less spaced cracks.


Document: 

SP-345_02

Date: 

February 1, 2021

Author(s):

Jan Bielak, Norbert Will, Josef Hegger, and Sven Bosbach

Publication:

Symposium Papers

Volume:

345

Abstract:

Textile-reinforced concrete (TRC) combines high-performance fabrics made of impregnated carbon yarns with state-of-the-art high strength concrete. Due to the corrosion resistance of non-metallic reinforcement, the application of TRC for external components especially with freeze-thaw and de-icing salt exposure is promising. This allows for reduction of concrete cover, to create slender structural elements and to execute thin slabs without additional waterproofing or protective decking. Different existing theoretical models and experience from various research projects were used in design of several pedestrian- and road bridges in Germany. The pedestrian bridges in Rems Valley and Ottenhöfen use TRC slabs without shear reinforcement as transversal loadbearing component. For the road bridges in Gaggenau, skew slabs made of TRC with shear reinforcement were chosen as principal structural system. Prior and during construction, experimental investigations on shear capacity were performed at the Institute of Structural Concrete (IMB) of RWTH Aachen. A comprehensive characterization of the material properties of the non-metallic reinforcement is a prerequisite for transfer and adaption of existing design rules, e.g. the determination of tensile strength of the bent portion of pre-formed shear reinforcement. This paper highlights the application potential and further challenges for the use of textilereinforced concrete in new engineering constructions.


Document: 

SP326-54

Date: 

August 10, 2018

Author(s):

Viktor Mechtcherine

Publication:

Symposium Papers

Volume:

326

Abstract:

Textile-reinforced concrete (TRC) has great potential for application in structures exposed to severe mechanical or environmental loading. This article presents an overview of the current knowledge available on the durability of this composite and its components. An additional focus is centered on the protection of steel reinforcement, such as in the case of the strengthening or repair of RC structures using TRC. In doing this, the transport properties of TRC in the cracked state, its long-term tensile strength and strain capacity, and resistance to aggressive environments have been identified as critical parameters. Current knowledge indicates that TRC can exhibit over the long term high mechanical performance and favorable transport properties when cracked. While the superior resistance of TRC to aggressive environments is to be expected when compared to ordinary concrete, there is little information available on the effects of aggressive environments on the mechanical properties of the material. Since TRC is still a relatively new material, there is no information available on its long-term performance in the field. To be able to utilize the superior qualities of TRC fully, it will be necessary to develop a realistic and reliable performance-based durability design concept for structures made of or strengthened by TRC. This paper is an attempt to provide elements for such a framework.


Document: 

SP326-70

Date: 

August 10, 2018

Author(s):

Adriana Angelotti, Sonia Leva, Giulio Zani, and Marco di Prisco

Publication:

Symposium Papers

Volume:

326

Abstract:

Sustainability of cement-based construction components is becoming a key point of the structural design process, since the implementation of green strategies favors an overall reduction of economic and environmental impacts. In the framework of a regionally funded research project, an innovative multi-layered roof element for the retrofitting of existing industrial buildings was developed at Politecnico di Milano. The development followed a holistic approach focusing on two main levels: 1) the optimization of the transverse section, aimed at minimizing the employment of cementitious composites such as High Performances Fiber Reinforced Concrete (HPFRC) and Textile Reinforced Concrete (TRC) and 2) the improvement of the energy performances, through the selection of adequate insulating materials (polystyrene and glass foam were considered) and the design of Building-Integrated PhotoVoltaics (BIPV). In this paper, preliminary considerations pertaining to the sectional and structural behavior of a 2.5 × 5 m [8.2 × 16.4 ft.] secondary panel are followed by the numerical/experimental evaluation of the thermal transmittance U and the BIPV performances. In this regard, a small demo roofing system housing three full scale panels was monitored throughout two Summer weeks, leading to the assessment of photovoltaics Performance Ratios (PR) and effectiveness of the architectural integration.


12345...>>

Results Per Page 




Please enter this 5 digit unlock code on the web page.