International Concrete Abstracts Portal

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  • The International Concrete Abstracts Portal is an ACI led collaboration with leading technical organizations from within the international concrete industry and offers the most comprehensive collection of published concrete abstracts.

International Concrete Abstracts Portal

Showing 1-10 of 481 Abstracts search results

Document: 

SP332

Date: 

August 8, 2019

Publication:

Special Publication

Volume:

332

Abstract:

The responsibilities for parties involved in a repair project may be significantly different than those traditionally encountered in new concrete construction. The new ACI 562 Code Requirements for Assessment, Repair and Rehabilitation of Concrete Buildings and corresponding ACI 563 Specifications for Repair of Concrete in Buildings identify requirements for the Licensed Design Professional and the contractor’s Specialty Engineer during repair programs. Differing lines of authority in repair are presented through industry practice recommendations and case studies, along with identification of industry needs, informing parties engaged in concrete evaluation and repair projects.


Document: 

SP-332_08

Date: 

July 1, 2019

Author(s):

Ashok Kakade

Publication:

Special Publication

Volume:

332

Abstract:

When preparing ready-mix concrete for private applications, it is typically recommended that owners and contractors collaborate with suppliers and concrete specialists to understand the possibilities and limitations of concrete in their applications. Here, we describe a situation in which a homeowner took direct control over the exact specifications of concrete and admixtures, and ultimately resulted in an unsatisfactory concrete slab. The owner subsequently sued and settled with the concrete supplier outside of the court, which raises important questions regarding who maintains responsibility for concrete mixtures, their installation, and the final slab results. Suggestions are provided to help mitigate this problem.


Document: 

CI4102Widianto

Date: 

February 1, 2019

Author(s):

Widianto, Erik Åldstedt, Kjell Tore Fosså, Jonathan Hurff, and Mohammad S. Khan

Publication:

Concrete International

Volume:

41

Issue:

2

Abstract:

A gravity-based structure (GBS) is a massive foundation placed on the seabed to serve as the base for offshore structures. The design, material specifications, and construction of GBS systems are covered by “Guide for the Design and Construction of Fixed Offshore Concrete Structures (ACI 357R).” A task group within ACI Committee 357, Offshore and Marine Concrete Structures, is currently updating the document.


Document: 

SP327

Date: 

November 20, 2018

Publication:

Special Publication

Volume:

327

Abstract:

Fiber-reinforced polymer (FRP) composite materials been widely used in civil engineering new construction and repair of structures due to their superior properties. FRP provides options and benefits not available using traditional materials. The promise of FRP materials lies in their high-strength, lightweight, noncorrosive, nonconducting, and nonmagnetic properties. ACI Committee 440 has published reports, guides, and specifications on the use of FRP materials for may reinforcement applications based on available test data, technical reports, and field applications. The aim of these document is to help practitioners implement FRP technology while providing testimony that design and construction with FRP materials systems is rapidly moving from emerging to mainstream technology.

This volume represents the thirteen in the symposium series and could not have been put together without the help, dedication, cooperation, and assistance of many volunteers and ACI staff members. First, we would like to thank the authors for meeting our various deadlines for submission, providing an opportunity for FRPRCS-13 to showcase the most current work possible at the symposium. Second, the International Scientific Steering Committee, consisting of many distinguished international researchers, including chairs of past FRPRCS symposia, many distinguished reviewers and members of the ACI Committee 440 who volunteered their time and carefully evaluated and thoroughly reviewed the technical papers, and whose input and advice have been a contributing factor to the success of this volume.


Document: 

SP327-45

Date: 

November 1, 2018

Author(s):

Alvaro Ruiz Emparanza, Raphael Kampmann and Francisco De Caso y Basalo

Publication:

Special Publication

Volume:

327

Abstract:

One of the main reasons for the degradation of our infrastructure is steel corrosion in reinforced concrete. To com- bat that issue, alternative non-corrosive materials, such as fiber reinforced polymer (FRP) rebars, were developed and implemented as internal reinforcement for concrete structures. Because of significant physio-mechanical advantages (magnetic transparency, high strength, corrosion resistance, etc.), the adoption of FRP rebars increased rapidly through- out the last decades. Due to an increased material demand, the number of FRP rebar manufacturers grew, but each manufacturer started to develop proprietary products, with wide ranging properties — the industry is in need for guidance and unification. Therefore, this study aims to centralize the relevant information by (i) summarizing the globally available regulations, (ii) providing background data for the present production status, and (iii) listing the currently produced FRP rebars in an effort to compare their physio-mechanical properties. Analysis of the market showed that 27 manufacturers produce FRP rebars in 14 countries with diverse output quantities and different distribution logistics. The various production approaches lead to different rebar types with dissimilar surface properties and significant strength differences.


Document: 

SP327-43

Date: 

November 1, 2018

Author(s):

Wassim M. Ghannoum, Nawaf K. Alotaibi, Jose Garcia, Chang Hyuk Kim, Yungon Kim, Douglas Pudleiner, Kevin Quinn, Neil Satrom, William Shekarchi, Wei Sun, Helen Wang, and James O. Jirsa

Publication:

Special Publication

Volume:

327

Abstract:

Strengthening using carbon fiber reinforced polymers (CFRP) provides a valuable addition to available structural preservation and life extension techniques. Damaged bridges can be repaired efficiently while structurally deficient bridges can be effectively retrofitted to higher load capacities using CFRP materials. A large research program has been ongoing since 2008 in Texas to demonstrate the effectiveness of using anchored CFRP sheets in shear strengthening of reinforced concrete bridge beams and girders. The research program has encompassed three main thrusts: 1) over 70 large-scale tests of concrete bridge sections strengthened using externally applied anchored CFRP sheets, 2) small-scale tests aimed at developing CFRP anchor design criteria as well as a simple test procedure for quality control of materials and installation, and 3) developing design specifications for CFRP anchors and sheets in shear strengthening applications. An overview of the experimental findings of the program is presented.


Document: 

SP327-14

Date: 

November 1, 2018

Author(s):

Paolo Rocchetti, Guillermo Claure, Francisco De Caso, and Antonio Nanni

Publication:

Special Publication

Volume:

327

Abstract:

The aim of this project is to develop the necessary design knowledge to implement GFRP reinforcement in concrete traffic barriers. Innovation lies in the use of GFRP closed continuous stirrups that became recently available. The design method relies on AASHTO-LRFD Bridge Design Specification and the latest development in specifications issued by the Florida Department of Transportation (FDOT) for Reinforced Concrete (RC) Traffic Barriers. After a review of design procedures for traffic barriers and understanding the mechanical characteristics of GFRP reinforcement, a modified design approach is proposed to reduce GFRP reinforcement amounts and complexity in construction. Supported on experience gained from designing FDOT 32” F–Shape (F32) GFRP RC used in the Halls River Bridge Replacement Project, this study also addressed the 36”–Single Slope (SS36) traffic barrier to be adopted by FDOT in coming years.


Document: 

CI4011Q&A

Date: 

November 1, 2018

Publication:

Concrete International

Volume:

40

Issue:

11

Abstract:

Can ACI codes, specifications, guides, and reports be referenced in building codes, project specifications, or contract documents?


Document: 

SP-330-09

Date: 

September 26, 2018

Author(s):

B. Stein, R. Ryan, Y. Bu, and K. Vallens

Publication:

Special Publication

Volume:

330

Abstract:

One of the important objectives of enhancing the sustainability of concrete construction consists of reducing the unwanted rebuilding of the same and extending the service life of buildings, structures and pavements. Proper maintenance, preservation and rehabilitation practices extend service life and improve structural and functional performance of transportation infrastructure. Minimization of impact on traffic is an important requirement for selecting materials and methods of maintenance and repair. Use of rapid strength concrete (RSC) that develops compressive strength of 2500 - 3500 psi (17.2 – 24.1 MPa) in 1.5 – 5 hours is one solution for reducing the duration of closures of highways and structures during repairs. The paper discusses: (i) Principles of proportioning of RSC; (ii) Performance of RSC; (iii) State-of-art practices; and (iv) Performance specifications for RSC.


Document: 

SP-329-36

Date: 

September 26, 2018

Author(s):

Josephine Cheung, Elizabeth Burns, Joshua Curto, and Nathan Tregger

Publication:

Special Publication

Volume:

329

Abstract:

The production of sustainable building materials, such as concrete, has drawn increasing attention in the last decade. Breakthroughs in the development of new admixtures, optimized mix designs, innovative concrete management systems, together with a deeper understanding of the best-mode usage of admixtures with different cementitious materials have resulted in the production of sustainable concrete with better performance at a lower cost. This paper presents three approaches for producing sustainable concrete: (1) introduction of a new class of admixture systems that produce control flow concrete or concrete with flow characteristics of self-consolidating concrete (SCC) without using high cement content, (2) minimization of polycarboxylate ether/ester (PCE) and cement usage through better understanding of the interaction between PCEs and sulfates and (3) use of in-transit concrete management systems (iCMS) to consistently deliver concrete that will meet desired specifications with minimal over-design.


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