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International Concrete Abstracts Portal

Showing 1-2 of 2 Abstracts search results

Document: 

92-M17

Date: 

March 1, 1995

Author(s):

Michael McVay, Jeff Rish III, Chris Sakezles, Shaik Mohseen, and Charles Beatty

Publication:

Materials Journal

Volume:

92

Issue:

2

Abstract:

The scaling of concrete parking aprons under F/A-l 8 and B-l aircraft asso-ciated with chemical attack from spilled lubricants and heat has been repro-duced in the laboratory. Two different series of tests involving the refluxing of lubricants, water and concrete were performed. The first involved reflux ing ground concretes, and the second, refluxed concrete-coated cylinders. Series 1 tests identijed if the replacement materials were suspect to attack, and Series 2 ‘was designed to measure strength loss of ordinary portland cement- (OPC) coated specimens, as well as replacement materials. Over 10 different coatings and 10 different inlay replacement materials were tested and compared to OPC control specimens. It was found that OPC lost 55 percent of its strength after 7 days, whereas neutral pH cements showed no reaction (Series 1 tests) and no strength loss (Series 2 tests). Only polyvi-nyl alcohol and polyacrylic acid coatings showed a significant reduction in attack (40percent) of all the coatings tested.

DOI:

10.14359/9766


Document: 

90-M28

Date: 

May 1, 1993

Author(s):

Michael C. McVay, Lee D. Smithson, and Charles Manzione

Publication:

Materials Journal

Volume:

90

Issue:

3

Abstract:

The Department of Defense has seen an increase in airfield concrete apron distress in the form of surface scaling when exposed to cyclic heat, spilled lubricants, and/or hydraulic fluids. Chemical analysis of the damaged concrete reveals that the spilled fluids are undergoing hydrolysis (breakdown) accompanied by the consumption of calcium hydroxide, and hydrated silicate and aluminate phases. The damage was reproduced in the laboratory on 3 ft by 4-in. (10.2-cm) thick slabs during 5 weeks of exposure to lubricants and cyclic heat. Use of penetrating sealants, coatings and/or neutral pH concretes are suggested for pavements exposed to this environment.

DOI:

10.14359/3881


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