International Concrete Abstracts Portal

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  • The International Concrete Abstracts Portal is an ACI led collaboration with leading technical organizations from within the international concrete industry and offers the most comprehensive collection of published concrete abstracts.

International Concrete Abstracts Portal

Showing 1-10 of 2679 Abstracts search results

Document: 

CI4109ConcreteQA

Date: 

September 1, 2019

Publication:

Concrete International

Volume:

41

Issue:

9

Abstract:

Does the new ACI 318-19 Code1 allow the use of Grade 80 steel for earthquake-induced moment, axial force, or both, in special moment frames or shear walls?

As part of an asset management project, I’m trying to put life expectancy numbers to reinforced concrete sanitary structures. However, I’m having no luck finding reference materials that contain this information. Can you point me to any publication that discusses the life expectancy of reinforced concrete structures (sanitary or other)?


Document: 

CI4108Azarijafari

Date: 

August 1, 2019

Author(s):

Hessam Azarijafari, Julie K. Buffenbarger, and Sean Monkman

Publication:

Concrete International

Volume:

41

Issue:

8

Abstract:

The Eco Concrete Competition was proposed by ACI Committee 130 in 2014 with the goal of promoting mixture design as an important aspect of concrete sustainability. The rules require students to design two mixtures with the same water-binder ratio (w/b) but different constituents: the base case scenario (BCS) and the alternative case scenario (ACS). Teams are evaluated based on comparisons of the environmental impacts of the BCS and ACS mixtures.


Document: 

CI4107Sfikas

Date: 

July 1, 2019

Author(s):

Ioannis P. Sfikas, Leo D. McKibbins, and George Daoutis

Publication:

Concrete International

Volume:

41

Issue:

7

Abstract:

The New Orbital Highway (NOH) is a vital component of Qatar’s preparation for the 2022 FIFA World Cup. Contract 3 (NOH3) is the largest of four contracts on this project. Using advanced deterioration modeling tools and thermal analysis models, minimum requirements for concrete materials and mixture designs were specified to accommodate the very aggressive local environment and ground conditions. This article summarizes the actions taken to ensure a 120-year design life for major concrete structures of Qatar’s NOH3 project.


Document: 

CI1406Becker

Date: 

June 1, 2019

Author(s):

Becker, R.J.; Holland, T.C., and Malits, F.S.

Publication:

Concrete International

Volume:

41

Issue:

6

Abstract:

ACI 318-19 has added provisions allowing the use of alternative cements. Prior to application of these new materials in structural concrete, however, several issues must be addressed to ensure that code provisions are being met. Generating the required information may be time-consuming. While the developed data should be applicable to other projects, additional documentation may be needed to address project-specific needs.


Document: 

SP331

Date: 

March 1, 2019

Author(s):

ACI Committee 345, ACI Committee 201, Yail J. Kim, Isamu Yoshitake, and Mark F. Green

Publication:

Special Publication

Volume:

331

Abstract:

Sustainability is one of the salient requirements in modern society. Structures frequently deteriorate because of aggressive service environments; consequently, federal and state agencies expend significant endeavors to maintain the quality of the structures. Among many factors, durability plays a major role in accomplishing the concept of sustainability. Extensive research has been conducted to understand the deterioration mechanisms of concrete and to extend the longevity of concrete members. Over the past decades, the advancement of technologies has resulted in durable construction materials such as advanced composites. This Special Publication (SP) contains nine papers selected from two technical sessions held in the ACI Spring Convention at Detroit, MI, in March 2017. All manuscripts were reviewed by at least two experts in accordance with the ACI publication policy.


Document: 

SP331-08

Date: 

February 1, 2019

Author(s):

Hayder Alghazali, Zuhair Al-Jaberi, Zena Aljazaeri, John J. Myers

Publication:

Special Publication

Volume:

331

Abstract:

Structures may need to be repaired for different reasons, such as, construction or design defects, or service stage changing which include, ageing of structures or deterioration due to exposure to aggressive environmental conditions. New materials are emerging, such as steel reinforced Polymer (SRP) composite, which can be used to strengthen and repair structures with greater durability and less maintenance over the life of the structure. An experimental test program was carried out to investigate the performance of repaired damaged concrete beams with (SRP) repair technique. Six full-scale reinforced concrete (RC) beams were designed and tested using 4-point load test setup to be failed in lap splice in the middle region of the beam. The damaged concrete was repaired, and SRP sheet (longitudinal soffit laminates and transverse U-wrapping strips) was applied to restore the original flexural capacity. All beams were 10 ft (3.0 m) in length, 18 in. (457 mm) in depth, and 12 in. (305 mm) in width. Different repairing configurations were investigated. The studied variables were the number of plies and the amount and distribution of U-wrapping strips. Ultimate load capacity, deflection, and mode of failure were recorded during testing. The test results were compared to beam results with continuous reinforcement. It was concluded that repairing beams with SRP plies and U-wrapping strips can restore the beam to a capacity similar to that of reinforced concrete (RC) beam with continuous reinforcement.


Document: 

SP327

Date: 

November 20, 2018

Publication:

Special Publication

Volume:

327

Abstract:

Fiber-reinforced polymer (FRP) composite materials been widely used in civil engineering new construction and repair of structures due to their superior properties. FRP provides options and benefits not available using traditional materials. The promise of FRP materials lies in their high-strength, lightweight, noncorrosive, nonconducting, and nonmagnetic properties. ACI Committee 440 has published reports, guides, and specifications on the use of FRP materials for may reinforcement applications based on available test data, technical reports, and field applications. The aim of these document is to help practitioners implement FRP technology while providing testimony that design and construction with FRP materials systems is rapidly moving from emerging to mainstream technology.

This volume represents the thirteen in the symposium series and could not have been put together without the help, dedication, cooperation, and assistance of many volunteers and ACI staff members. First, we would like to thank the authors for meeting our various deadlines for submission, providing an opportunity for FRPRCS-13 to showcase the most current work possible at the symposium. Second, the International Scientific Steering Committee, consisting of many distinguished international researchers, including chairs of past FRPRCS symposia, many distinguished reviewers and members of the ACI Committee 440 who volunteered their time and carefully evaluated and thoroughly reviewed the technical papers, and whose input and advice have been a contributing factor to the success of this volume.


Document: 

SP327-50

Date: 

November 1, 2018

Author(s):

Paulina Arczewska, Maria Anna Polak and Alexander Penlidis

Publication:

Special Publication

Volume:

327

Abstract:

This paper presents an investigation on deterioration of tensile and shear properties of GFRP bars. Composite bars, contrary to conventional steel, when used in structures exposed to aggressive environments can significantly increase their durability and lifetime. However, the use of GFRP bars in concrete structures is still limited due to unspecified durability properties of this relatively new material. Since long-term durability data are not readily available, accelerated aging tests have been used in this research to study GFRP bar degradation. GFRP bars were kept in a highly alkaline solution heated to 50, 60 and 70°C for 1, 3 and 5 months, respectively, and after each immersion period, bars were taken out and tested in tension and shear. The test results show that the high pH of the alkaline solution has an adverse influence on GFRP properties, and the speed of degradation depends on the temperature of the solution. Also, the effect of bar size and surface finishing on the degradation speed was analyzed, and the results are presented in the paper.


Document: 

SP327-45

Date: 

November 1, 2018

Author(s):

Alvaro Ruiz Emparanza, Raphael Kampmann and Francisco De Caso y Basalo

Publication:

Special Publication

Volume:

327

Abstract:

One of the main reasons for the degradation of our infrastructure is steel corrosion in reinforced concrete. To com- bat that issue, alternative non-corrosive materials, such as fiber reinforced polymer (FRP) rebars, were developed and implemented as internal reinforcement for concrete structures. Because of significant physio-mechanical advantages (magnetic transparency, high strength, corrosion resistance, etc.), the adoption of FRP rebars increased rapidly through- out the last decades. Due to an increased material demand, the number of FRP rebar manufacturers grew, but each manufacturer started to develop proprietary products, with wide ranging properties — the industry is in need for guidance and unification. Therefore, this study aims to centralize the relevant information by (i) summarizing the globally available regulations, (ii) providing background data for the present production status, and (iii) listing the currently produced FRP rebars in an effort to compare their physio-mechanical properties. Analysis of the market showed that 27 manufacturers produce FRP rebars in 14 countries with diverse output quantities and different distribution logistics. The various production approaches lead to different rebar types with dissimilar surface properties and significant strength differences.


Document: 

SP327-44

Date: 

November 1, 2018

Author(s):

Emmanuel Ferrier, Carmelo Caggegi, and Laurent Michel

Publication:

Special Publication

Volume:

327

Abstract:

In design of structures, both the ultimate limit state (ULS) and the serviceability limit state of the structure must be verified. Carbon fiber reinforced polymer (CFRP) materials have high strength, and large amounts of CFRP are not needed for ULS. On the other hand, CFRP may be needed to introduce enough stiffness for meeting the serviceability design criteria and reduce the crack of concrete. The effects of externally bonded composite plates on the mechanical behavior of a cracked RC beam, loaded in flexure, are obtained by an experimental approach. The problem of crack width prediction is addressed. The model values are compared to experimental data obtained using a digital image correlation method. The crack width and spacing is measured as a function of load to analyze crack propagation. Finally, the study focuses on the validation of the codes model for calculating crack widths and curvatures in strengthened beams.


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