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International Concrete Abstracts Portal

Showing 1-5 of 97 Abstracts search results

Document: 

20-210

Date: 

July 1, 2021

Author(s):

Tayseer Z. Batran, Mohamed K. Ismail, and Assem A. A. Hassan

Publication:

Materials Journal

Volume:

118

Issue:

4

Abstract:

This study investigated the structural behavior of lightweight self-consolidating concrete (LWSCC) beams strengthened with engineered cementitious composite (ECC). Four LWSCC beams were strengthened at either the compression or tension zone using two types of ECC developed with polyvinyl alcohol (PVA) fibers or steel fibers (SFs). Three beams were also cast in full depth with LWSCC, ECC with PVA, and ECC with SFs, for comparison. The performance of all tested beams was evaluated based on loaddeflection response, cracking behavior, failure mode, first crack load, ultimate load, ductility, and energy absorption capacity. The flexural ultimate capacity of the tested beams was also estimated theoretically and compared to the experimental results. The results indicated that adding the ECC layer at the compression zone of the beam helped the LWSCC beams to sustain a higher ultimate loading, accompanied with obvious increases in the ductility and energy absorption capacity. Higher increases in the flexural capacity were exhibited by the beams strengthened with the ECC layer at the tension zone. Placing the ECC layer at the tension zone also contributed to controlling the formation of cracks, ensuring better durability for structural members. Using ECC with SFs yielded higher flexural capacity in beams compared to using ECC with PVA fibers. The study also indicated that the flexural capacity of single-layer and/or hybrid composite beams was conservatively estimated by the ACI ultimate strength design method and the Henager and Doherty model. More improvements in the Henager and Doherty model’s estimates were observed when the tensile stress of fibrous concrete was obtained experimentally.

DOI:

10.14359/51732635


Document: 

19-455

Date: 

March 1, 2021

Author(s):

Mohamed M. Sadek and Assem A. A. Hassan

Publication:

Materials Journal

Volume:

118

Issue:

2

Abstract:

This study evaluated the abrasion resistance for a number of lightweight self-consolidating concrete (LWSCC) incorporating coarse and fine lightweight expanded slate aggregates (LC or LF, respectively). The study also investigated the abrasion resistance before and after exposure to freezing-and-thawing cycles in the presence of deicing salt. The investigated parameters included different volumes of LC and LF aggregates, three binder contents (500, 550, and 600 kg/m3 [31.2, 34.3, and 37.5 lb/ft3]), and different types of concrete (LWSCC, lightweight vibrated concrete, and normal-weight self-consolidating concrete). Increasing the percentage of expanded slate aggregate decreased the abrasion resistance. Mixtures with LF showed higher strength-per-weight ratio and higher abrasion and salt-scaling resistance compared to mixtures with LC. Samples exposed to abrasion before salt scaling had higher mass losses due to salt scaling with an average of 26.8% compared to non-abraded ones. Higher mass loss was also observed in mixtures exposed to abrasion after the exposure to salt scaling with an average of 26% and 43.3% in the rotating-cutter and sandblasting abrasion tests, respectively.

DOI:

10.14359/51729325


Document: 

19-372

Date: 

January 1, 2021

Author(s):

Guilherme S. Araujo, Lui C. Iwamoto, Rosa C. C. Lintz, and Luisa A. Gachet

Publication:

Materials Journal

Volume:

118

Issue:

1

Abstract:

For the production of this lightweight concrete, expanded polystyrene (EPS) associated with expanded clay sintered lightweight aggregates were used to replace nature aggregates. Materials characterization tests were performed, as well as tests of the concrete in the fresh and hardened state. It is worth noting that the fresh tests displayed that the EPS concretes produced met the requirements of ABNT NBR 15823-1: 2017, classifying them as self-compacting. The hardened concrete tests observed the compressive strength, tensile strength, water absorption, void index, and specific mass. All concretes achieved resistances above 20 MPa, considered structural, and presented low specific mass, below 2000 kg/m3, classifying them as light concrete. Scanning electron microscopy (SEM) images allowed a better understanding of the microstructure, justifying the mechanical results obtained. The transition zone between the cement paste and the light aggregates, the number of voids in the cement paste, and the appearance of microcracks were considered.

DOI:

10.14359/51728280


Document: 

19-312

Date: 

September 1, 2020

Author(s):

Ahmed T. Omar, Mohamed M. Sadek, and Assem A. A. Hassan

Publication:

Materials Journal

Volume:

117

Issue:

5

Abstract:

This study aims to evaluate the impact resistance and mechanical properties of a number of developed lightweight self-consolidating concrete (LWSCC) mixtures under cold temperatures. To achieve LWSCC mixtures with minimum possible density, the authors explored different replacement levels of normalweight fine or coarse aggregates by lightweight fine and coarse expanded slate aggregates. The studied parameters included testing temperature (+20°C, 0°C, and –20°C), type of lightweight aggregate (either fine or coarse expanded slate aggregates), binder content (550 and 600 kg/m3 [34.3 and 37.5 lb/ft3]), coarse-to-fine (C/F) aggregate ratio (0.7 and 1.0), and the use of polyvinyl alcohol (PVA) fibers (fibered and nonfibered mixtures). The results indicated that for all tested mixtures, decreasing the temperature of concrete below room temperature significantly improved the mechanical properties and impact resistance. Increasing the percentage of lightweight fine or coarse aggregate in the mixture showed more improvement in the mechanical properties and impact resistance under cold temperatures. However, the failure mode of all tested specimens appeared to be more brittle under subzero temperatures. It was also observed that the inclusion of PVA fibers helped to compensate for the brittleness that resulted from decreasing the temperature, and it further enhanced the impact resistance and mechanical properties under low temperatures.

DOI:

10.14359/51725975


Document: 

19-232

Date: 

May 1, 2020

Author(s):

Mohamed M. Sadek, Mohamed K. Ismail, and Assem A. A. Hassan

Publication:

Materials Journal

Volume:

117

Issue:

3

Abstract:

This study aimed to optimize the use of fine and coarse expanded slate lightweight aggregates in developing successful semi-lightweight self-consolidating concrete (SLWSCC) mixtures with densities ranging from 1850 to 2000 kg/m3 (115.5 to 124.9 lb/ft3) and strength of at least 50 MPa (7.25 ksi). All SLWSCC mixtures were developed by replacing either the fine or coarse normal-weight aggregates with expanded slate aggregates. Two additional normal-weight self-consolidating concrete mixtures were developed for comparison. The results indicated that due to the challenge in achieving acceptable self-consolidation, a minimum binder content of at least 500 kg/m3 (31.2 lb/ft3) and a minimum water-binder ratio (w/b) of 0.4 were required to develop successful SLWSCC with expanded slate. The use of metakaolin and fly ash were also found to be necessary to develop successful mixtures with optimized strength, flowability, and stability. The results also showed that SLWSCC mixtures made with expanded slate fine aggregate required more high-range water-reducing admixture than mixtures made with expanded slate coarse aggregate. However, at a given density, mixtures developed with expanded slate fine aggregate generally exhibited better fresh properties in terms of flowability and passing ability, as well as higher strength compared to mixtures developed with expanded slate coarse aggregate.

DOI:

10.14359/51722407


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