ABOUT THE INTERNATIONAL CONCRETE ABSTRACTS PORTAL

  • The International Concrete Abstracts Portal is an ACI led collaboration with leading technical organizations from within the international concrete industry and offers the most comprehensive collection of published concrete abstracts.

International Concrete Abstracts Portal

Showing 1-5 of 7 Abstracts search results

Document: 

SP94-39

Date: 

July 1, 1987

Author(s):

C. Wohlk

Publication:

Symposium Papers

Volume:

94

Abstract:

In Denmark, all important concrete bridges are waterproofed and asphalt paved. Joints in bridge surfacing are important details as leakage often starts along the edges and the expansion devices. Practice has shown that with a proper sealant, joint leakage is much more apt to occur between the sealant and the joint sides than due to a break in the sealant. A low elastic modulus of the sealant will reduce the tension between the sealant and the joint sides and is consequently an important property. A suitable primer should always be used, and the shape factor of the joint should be restricted to about 1:1. The present Danish specifications for joint sealants and primers are quoted and discussed. Important details of the workmanship are also specified. Measurements of typical movements in bridge surfacings are reported. Research concerning new specifications is presented. An elaborate device for testing the deformation properties of joint sealants at different temperatures down to -20 C has been constructed. It is intended to use the device to study the influence of such characteristics as aging, water, alkali, and joint geometry. It is expected that the investigation will result in new and more relevant specifications and easier control procedures. The research is directed toward bridge joints, but the results are applicable to joints in concrete roads as well.

DOI:

10.14359/1713


Document: 

SP94-04

Date: 

September 1, 1986

Author(s):

Conrad P.Bridges

Publication:

Symposium Papers

Volume:

94

Abstract:

The concrete girder for the Pasco-Kennewick Intercity Bridge is continuous (i.e., without intermediate expansion joints) for its entire 2500-ft (762-m) length. Nearly 1800 ft (549 m) of this girder is suspended entirely from towers by stay cables. The remaining portions are supported on sliding disk bearings. The girder is fixed at only one end; all expansion and contraction occurs at the opposite end, requiring an expansion joint with a 26-in. (660-mm) movement capability--the largest of any as of the time it was installed (1978). To control permanent deformations and thereby minimize the size of bearings and joints, the designer called for: (1) the girder to be precast in segments; (2) a minimum 28-day compressive strength of 6000 psi (41 MPa); (3) special requirements for curing the segments; and (4) the segments to be stored for at least 90 days prior to erecting them. The sequence of construction complicated the installation of the bearings. The bridge was built in stages with each stage having a different temporary fixed bearing. Thus, the setting (offset) of each bearing had to provide for the permanent deformations that the partial-length girder would undergo before being incorporated into the final structure, as well as for the predicted temperature at that later date. Following seven years of service, the deformations in the girder and movements in the bearings and joints have been within the limits assumed in their design. All components are performing fully as intended.

DOI:

10.14359/3471


Document: 

SP70-58

Date: 

January 1, 1981

Author(s):

Heinz Honegger

Publication:

Symposium Papers

Volume:

70

Abstract:

This technical note describes several expansion joint and drainage details used on bridges in Europe. The details include a technique to prevent deterioration of bituminous surfacings at expansion joints, an adjustable drainage grating, a combination drainage/ventilation element and an expansion bellows to prevent damage to utility pipes from movement of the bridge.

DOI:

10.14359/17456


Document: 

SP70-36

Date: 

January 1, 1981

Author(s):

Reinard W. Brandley

Publication:

Symposium Papers

Volume:

70

Abstract:

The only runway at San Diego International Airport, SanDiego, California, is of World War II vintage, consisting of Portland Cement Concrete (PCC) pavement placed on a dredged fill. Failure of this pavement under load has progressed to a point where rehabilitation and/or strengthening is necessary. Early observations indicated that poor performance of the joints in the Portland Cement Concrete pavement was largely responsible for the failures which had occurred. There was evidence of large total deflection of the joint and of large movement of one slab with respect to the adjoining slab (slab rocking) under heavy loading conditions. A new deflection beam was developed, and total deflection and slab rockinq under load was measured for all critical joints on the runway pavement. All joints which showed excessive total deflection were grouted, and all joints which showed excessive slab rocking were treated with a new design of load transfer device. An 8-in. bituminous surface course was placed as a strengthening overlay. Joints were sawed and sealed in the bituminous surface course to match the PCC joints to control reflective cracking. Tests conducted subsequent to construction show that the rehabilitated pavement joints have performed well.

DOI:

10.14359/17434


Document: 

SP70-33

Date: 

January 1, 1981

Author(s):

Egons Tons and Starr Kohn

Publication:

Symposium Papers

Volume:

70

Abstract:

Graphical procedures are presented for optimum dimensioning of a joint-slab-sealant system coupled with material properties. PART 1 covers an approach for sealing with compression type sealants while PART 2 concentrates on molded-in-place sealants. Horizontal joint movements are emphasized in both cases. While the main emphasis is placed on concrete pavement joint sealing, the methods are also applicable to other joints, such as those in bridges or structures and even cracks. The procedures used to construct each set of curves are given so that the graphs can be adjusted for other joint or crack sealing applications. The paper also outlines areas where more work and data are needed.

DOI:

10.14359/17431


12

Results Per Page 




Please enter this 5 digit unlock code on the web page.