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International Concrete Abstracts Portal

Showing 1-5 of 42 Abstracts search results

Document: 

SP324

Date: 

May 16, 2018

Author(s):

Gianmarco de Felice, Lesley H. Sneed, and Antonio Nanni

Publication:

Symposium Papers

Volume:

324

Abstract:

This SP is the result of two technical sessions held during the 2017 ACI Spring Convention in Detroit, MI. Via presentations and the resulting collection of papers, it was the intention of the sponsoring committees (ACI Committees 549 and 562 together with Rilem TC 250) to bring to the attention of the technical community the progress being made on a new class of repair/strengthening materials for concrete and masonry structures. These materials are characterized by a cementitious matrix made of hydraulic or lime-based binders, which embeds reinforcement in the form of one or more fabrics also known as textiles. The great variability of fabric architectures (for example, cross sectional area, strand spacing, and fiber impregnation with organic resin) coupled with the types of material used (aramid, basalt, carbon, glass, polyparaphenylene benzobisoxazole (PBO) and coated ultra-high strength steel) makes the characterization, validation, and design of these systems rather challenging. Irrespective of the reinforcement type (synthetic or ultra-high strength steel), the impregnating mortar is applied by trowel or spray-up. It should also be noted that fabric reinforced cementitious matrix and steel reinforced grout, in particular, are very different from other repair technologies such as FRC (fiber reinforced concrete) and UHPC (Ultra High-Performance Concrete) in that they utilize continuous and oriented reinforcement. In a sense FRCM and SRG can be viewed as the modern evolution of ferrocement.


Document: 

SP272—01

Date: 

October 1, 2010

Author(s):

A.E. Naaman

Publication:

Symposium Papers

Volume:

272

Abstract:

This paper reviews progress spanning a period of about four decades during which the author was intimately involved in research and teaching in three distinct yet related fields of civil engineering: prestressed concrete, fiber reinforced concrete, and ferrocement and thin cementitious products. In retrospect and for each area, key contributions are mentioned, milestones recalled, and prospects for the near future envisioned. Issues related to partial prestressing, external prestressing, high performance fiber reinforced cement composites, strain-hardening FRC composites, 3D textiles and the like are addressed. Technical advances are webbed with some personal milestones as well. Important research issues to address in the near future are pointed out.

DOI:

10.14359/51664097


Document: 

SP251

Date: 

March 1, 2008

Author(s):

Editor: Corina-Maria Aldea / Sponsored by: ACI Committee 549

Publication:

Symposium Papers

Volume:

251

Abstract:

The main advantage of textiles as reinforcements in cement-based composites is in the enhancement of mechanical behavior. Textile-reinforced concrete (TRC) has emerged as a novel composite with various potential applications in non-structural and, more recently, structural building materials, including thin and slender elements, repair, and strengthening of existing structural members. The wide variety of textile production methods allows great flexibility in textile design, which enables controlling of textile geometry, yarn geometry, and orientation of yarns in various directions. This diversity is advantageous in the development of cement-based composites and allows engineering of the performance of the final products for the desired requirements. Recognizing the increasing research interest in thin fiber-reinforced cement-based composites using fabrics and hybrid systems (fabrics + chopped fibers) and their emerging industrial applications in the last years, there has been a close communication and collaboration between ACI Committee 549, Thin Reinforced Cementitious Products and Ferrocement, and RILEM TC 201, Textile Reinforced Concrete (TRC), in the area of TRC. Following two two-part technical sessions, held at the 2005 ACI conventions in New York and Kansas City, ACI Committee 549 sponsored the technical session “Design and Applications of Textile Reinforced Concrete” at the ACI Fall 2007 Convention in Puerto Rico. Seven papers were presented by invited international experts from Germany and co-authored by members of RILEM TC 201. This Special Publication (SP) contains seven papers that provide insight into the state-of-the-art design and application of TRC. The topics of the papers cover the following: materials aspects related to serviceability; strength and damage accumulation; TRC for flexural strengthening of reinforced concrete structures – structural behavior, design model, and application for a concrete shell; use of TRC as a subsequently applied waterproof structure; application of TRC for lightweight structures; and sandwich panels with thin-walled TRC facings for structural exterior walls and nonstructural façades. The papers included in this publication have been peer reviewed by international experts in the field according to the guidelines established by the American Concrete Institute. The future of thin fiber and textile-reinforced cementitious systems depends on their ability to compete with existing solutions and to identify new applications. Efforts are required in the areas of process, design, and implementation in industrial and full-scale applications of TRC. On behalf of ACI Committee 549, the editor would like to thank all the authors for their contributions and the reviewers for their assistance and valuable suggestions and comments.

DOI:

10.14359/19749


Document: 

SP224

Date: 

December 1, 2004

Author(s):

Editor: Ashish Dubey / Sponsored by: ACI Committee 549

Publication:

Symposium Papers

Volume:

224

Abstract:

"This publication contains the papers originally presented in a symposium on the topic of thin reinforced cementitious products organized by ACI Committee 549, Thin Reinforced Cementitious Products and Ferrocement, during the ACI 2003 Spring Convention held in Vancouver, British Columbia, Canada. The symposium explored current state-of-the-art and recent advances in material science, manufacturing methods, and practical applications of thin reinforced cementitious products. The topics covered in this publication include material science of textile reinforced concrete, use of textile reinforced concrete for integrated formwork and exterior cladding panels, prestressed thin-sheet concrete products, ultra-high-performance thin precast concrete products, production of concrete tubes by centrifugation method, freezing-and-thawing durability of commercial fiber-reinforced cement boards, structural evaluation of cement-skin sandwich building systems, microwave accelerated curing method for producing precast cementitious products, history of glass fiber-reinforced concrete (GFRC) products, and modeling of cement-based laminate composites." Note: The individual papers are also available as .pdf downloads.. Please click on the following link to view the papers available, or call 248.848.3800 to order. SP224

DOI:

10.14359/14031


Document: 

SP224-10

Date: 

December 1, 2004

Author(s):

K C G Ong, C P Teo, C H Shum, L H J Wong, S T Tan and C T Tam

Publication:

Symposium Papers

Volume:

224

Abstract:

The use of microwave technology to speed up the production of precast ferrocement secondary roofing slabs is explored in this paper. In particular, the use of discrete on-off microwave curing regimes and the effects of such regimes on the strength and durability of the ferrocement slabs are investigated. By a regime of on-off microwave application to maintain the temperature of the slab within a specified range during microwave curing, overheating of the slabs can be avoided. High early age strengths were attained in slabs cured using such regimes, with no strength loss at 28 days. In addition, the durability of such slabs need not be compromised. The use of an appropriate reduced power level during the later stage of the curing process was found to result in a marginal improvement in the near surface quality without any reduction in early age strength.

DOI:

10.14359/13413


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