ABOUT THE INTERNATIONAL CONCRETE ABSTRACTS PORTAL

  • The International Concrete Abstracts Portal is an ACI led collaboration with leading technical organizations from within the international concrete industry and offers the most comprehensive collection of published concrete abstracts.

International Concrete Abstracts Portal

Showing 1-5 of 378 Abstracts search results

Document: 

20-210

Date: 

July 1, 2021

Author(s):

Tayseer Z. Batran, Mohamed K. Ismail, and Assem A. A. Hassan

Publication:

Materials Journal

Volume:

118

Issue:

4

Abstract:

This study investigated the structural behavior of lightweight self-consolidating concrete (LWSCC) beams strengthened with engineered cementitious composite (ECC). Four LWSCC beams were strengthened at either the compression or tension zone using two types of ECC developed with polyvinyl alcohol (PVA) fibers or steel fibers (SFs). Three beams were also cast in full depth with LWSCC, ECC with PVA, and ECC with SFs, for comparison. The performance of all tested beams was evaluated based on loaddeflection response, cracking behavior, failure mode, first crack load, ultimate load, ductility, and energy absorption capacity. The flexural ultimate capacity of the tested beams was also estimated theoretically and compared to the experimental results. The results indicated that adding the ECC layer at the compression zone of the beam helped the LWSCC beams to sustain a higher ultimate loading, accompanied with obvious increases in the ductility and energy absorption capacity. Higher increases in the flexural capacity were exhibited by the beams strengthened with the ECC layer at the tension zone. Placing the ECC layer at the tension zone also contributed to controlling the formation of cracks, ensuring better durability for structural members. Using ECC with SFs yielded higher flexural capacity in beams compared to using ECC with PVA fibers. The study also indicated that the flexural capacity of single-layer and/or hybrid composite beams was conservatively estimated by the ACI ultimate strength design method and the Henager and Doherty model. More improvements in the Henager and Doherty model’s estimates were observed when the tensile stress of fibrous concrete was obtained experimentally.

DOI:

10.14359/51732635


Document: 

20-268

Date: 

July 1, 2021

Author(s):

Savitha Sagari Srinivasan and Raissa Douglas Ferron

Publication:

Materials Journal

Volume:

118

Issue:

4

Abstract:

The presence of cracks in concrete is a concern because they can reduce the mechanical properties and durability of concrete. The presence of a single crack in concrete and its effect on strength and durability has been studied extensively, but the influence of multiple small cracks or microcracking density as it relates to serviceability is not as well understood. An experimental study was conducted to quantify the relationship between cracking parameters (width, depth, and density) and the strength, stiffness, and durability of concrete. It was found that the density of microcracks is an important factor to take into account for durability, as it can impact serviceability.

DOI:

10.14359/51732792


Document: 

19-421

Date: 

May 1, 2021

Author(s):

Sary A. Malak, Neven Krstulovic-Opara, and Rawan Sarieldine

Publication:

Materials Journal

Volume:

118

Issue:

3

Abstract:

This paper presents the derivation as well as empirical verification of a compressive stress-strain model of concrete confined with fiber-reinforced concrete (FRC) jackets made using steel fibers. Both conventional (that is, strain-softening) FRC and high-performance (that is, strain-hardening) FRC (HPFRC) were considered. The model accounts for the tensile response of the jacket as a function of the fiber properties, fiber volume fraction, orientation, and the effects of fiber debonding, fiber pullout, and multiple cracking. Specific FRC and HPFRC materials used in this study include fiber-reinforced mortar (FRM), FRC, and slurry-infiltrated fiber-reinforced concrete (SIFCON), all made using steel fibers. Experimental behavior of model columns jacketed with FRC and HPFRC was compared to that of columns confined with conventional fiber-reinforced polymer (FRP) jackets. HPFRC jackets made with continuous aligned fibers exhibited fiber debonding and multiple cracking leading to the post-peak softening response. Varying the orientation of fibers in FRC and FRM jackets produces radial tensile stresses on the concrete core, thus reducing the strength of confined concrete. Concrete confined with FRC jackets exhibited post-peak softening response with lower ductilities than concrete confined with HPFRC jackets due to the random orientation and lower volume fraction of fibers within FRC jackets. HPFRC jackets with steel fibers are expected to sustain large rupture strains in the longitudinal and transverse directions, which translates into an improved ductility and energy absorption, making it a suitable retrofit option for existing columns.

DOI:

10.14359/51730419


Document: 

20-253

Date: 

March 1, 2021

Author(s):

Goran Adil, Ceki Halmen, George Seegebrecht, and John T. Kevern

Publication:

Materials Journal

Volume:

118

Issue:

2

Abstract:

Corrosion performance of reinforced pervious concrete was evaluated through field and laboratory evaluations. Two reinforced pervious cemetery walls in Chicago, IL, were visually evaluated, and samples were investigated through petrographic examination. Corrosion performance of two-layered concrete samples, with an outer layer of conventional concrete and an inner layer of pervious concrete, was evaluated in the laboratory. Results indicated that pervious concrete around the reinforcement can significantly delay the cracking and spalling of samples compared to conventional concrete. Chloride profiles of samples and instantaneous corrosion rate measurements showed that corrosion of reinforcement embedded in two-layered samples was similar to conventional concrete although two-layered samples provided a longer time to cracking. Laboratory results are in agreement with long service life performance observed in the field and with prior pervious concrete corrosion studies.

DOI:

10.14359/51730514


Document: 

20-049

Date: 

January 1, 2021

Author(s):

J. Abellán-García, J. A. Fernández-Gómez, N. Torres-Castellanos, and A. M. Núñez-López

Publication:

Materials Journal

Volume:

118

Issue:

1

Abstract:

This paper investigates the tensile behavior of green ultra-high-performance fiber-reinforced concrete (UHPFRC) using commercially available steel fibers. An ecofriendly ultra-high-performance concrete (UHPC) with a low carbon footprint was developed, aiming for a compressive strength of 150 MPa (22 ksi) and a high packing density (0.81) while using recycled glass powder and micro-limestone powder as partial substitution of silica fume and ordinary portland cement. Besides the commercially available normal-strength deformed steel fibers, high-strength smooth steel fibers were used to establish a comparison. The study showed that, with appropriate hooked normal-strength and smooth high-strength steel fibers, 1% of fiber is enough to achieve strain hardening behavior. Moreover, the smooth fibers achieved the maximum tensile strength (σpc = 11.04 MPa) when 2% of volume was used. However, despite having less tensile strength, only the hooked-end fibers achieved a maximum post-cracking strain (εpc) of over 0.3% using 2% of volume.

DOI:

10.14359/51725992


12345...>>

Results Per Page 




Please enter this 5 digit unlock code on the web page.