ABOUT THE INTERNATIONAL CONCRETE ABSTRACTS PORTAL

  • The International Concrete Abstracts Portal is an ACI led collaboration with leading technical organizations from within the international concrete industry and offers the most comprehensive collection of published concrete abstracts.

International Concrete Abstracts Portal

Showing 1-5 of 406 Abstracts search results

Document: 

SP341

Date: 

July 17, 2020

Publication:

Symposium Papers

Volume:

341

Abstract:

ACI Committees 441 – Reinforced Concrete Columns and 341A – Earthquake-Resistant Concrete Bridge Columns, Mohamed A. ElGawady Columns are crucial structural elements in buildings and bridges. This Special Publication of the American Concrete Institute Committees 441 (Reinforced Concrete Columns) and 341A (Earthquake-Resistant Concrete Bridge Columns) presents the state-of-the-art on the structural performance of innovative bridge columns. The performance of columns incorporating high-performance materials such as ultra-high-performance concrete (UHPC), engineered cementitious composite (ECC), high-strength concrete, high-strength steel, and shape memory alloys is presented in this document. These materials are used in combination with conventional or advanced construction systems, such as using grouted rebar couplers, multi-hinge, and cross spirals. Such a combination improves the resiliency of reinforced concrete columns against natural and man-made disasters such as earthquakes and blast.


Document: 

SP-341-06

Date: 

June 30, 2020

Author(s):

Mostafa Tazarv and M. Saiid Saiidi

Publication:

Symposium Papers

Volume:

341

Abstract:

Current seismic codes prevent bridge collapse under strong earthquakes. For conventional reinforced concrete (RC) bridges, this performance objective is usually achieved through confinement of ductile members such as columns. When an RC bridge column undergoes large displacements, its reinforcement yield and sometimes buckle, the cover concrete spalls, and the core concrete sometimes fail. Damage of reinforcement and core concrete is not easy to repair. Advanced materials and new technologies are emerging to enhance the seismic performance of RC bridge columns by reducing damage, increasing displacement capacities, and/or reducing permanent lateral displacements. Two types of advanced materials, shape memory alloy (SMA) bars and engineered cementitious composite (ECC), are the focus of the present study. SMA bars are viable reinforcement for concrete structures since they resist large stresses with minimal residual strains. Furthermore, ECC, which is a type of fiber-reinforced concrete, shows significant tensile strain capacities with minimal damage. SMA-reinforced ECC bridge columns are ductile with minimal damage and insignificant residual displacements under extreme events. A displacement-based design method for NiTi superelastic SMA-reinforced ECC bridge columns is proposed based on large-scale experimental and extensive analytical studies. A summary of the proposed guidelines, background information, and supporting studies are presented for this novel column type to facilitate field deployment. Finally, the details of the world first SMA-reinforced ECC bridge constructed in Seattle, USA, is discussed.


Document: 

SP-336_02

Date: 

December 11, 2019

Author(s):

Nidhi M Modha and Pratanu Ghosh

Publication:

Symposium Papers

Volume:

336

Abstract:

In this research, a natural pozzolanic cementitious material known as zeolite is being utilized to investigate the performance of High-Performance Concrete (HPC). Several binary (cement+zeolite) and ternary (cement+zeolite+other supplementary cementitious material) based concrete mixtures including a control mixture of Ordinary Portland Cement (OPC) with water - cementitious (w/cm) ratios of 0.40 and 0.44 are cast by replacing cement with different percentage level of zeolite material. The purpose of this study is to investigate effectiveness of zeolite material by means of long term compressive strength (7 to 91 days), tensile strength, modulus of elasticity and corrosion resistance in several concrete mixtures from 7 to 28 days. The compressometer is utilized for the measurement of the modulus of elasticity and Universal Testing Machine (UTM) is utilized to measure the compressive and tensile strength of concrete. In addition, a 4-point Wenner Probe resistivity meter is tested to determine the surface electrical resistivity of concrete, which provides an indirect indication of permeability and in turn, chloride induced corrosion durability in reinforced concrete structures. Overall, zeolite based concrete mixtures with 0.40 w/cm ratio and ¾ inch aggregate size provide promising results in terms of compressive strength, tensile strength and remarkable improvement on corrosion resistance in terms of achievement of surface resistivity data.


Document: 

SP-336_01

Date: 

December 11, 2019

Author(s):

James Lafikes, Rouzbeh Khajehdehi, Muzai Feng, Matthew O’Reilly, David Darwin

Publication:

Symposium Papers

Volume:

336

Abstract:

Supplementary cementitious materials (SCMs) in conjunction with pre-wetted fine lightweight aggregate to provide internal curing are being increasingly used to produce high performance, low-shrinking concrete to mitigate bridge deck cracking, providing more sustainable projects with a longer service life. Additionally, the SCMs aid in concrete sustainability by reducing the amount of cement needed in these projects. This study examines the density of cracks in bridge decks in Indiana and Utah that incorporated internal curing with various combinations of portland cement and SCMs, specifically, slag cement, Class C and Class F fly ash, and silica fume, in concrete mixtures with water-cementitious material ratios ranging from 0.39 to 0.44. When compared with crack densities in low-cracking high-performance concrete (LC-HPC) and control bridge decks in Kansas, concrete mixtures with a paste content higher than 27% exhibited more cracking, regardless of the use of internal curing or SCMs. Bridge decks with paste contents below 26% that incorporate internal curing and SCMs exhibited low cracking at early ages, although additional surveys will be needed before conclusions on long term behavior can be made.


Document: 

SP-336_05

Date: 

December 11, 2019

Author(s):

Lisa E. Burris, Prasanth Alapati, Kimberly E. Kurtis, Amir Hajibabaee, M. Tyler Ley

Publication:

Symposium Papers

Volume:

336

Abstract:

Cement production is one of the largest contributors to CO2 emissions in the U.S. One method of reducing emissions associated with concrete is through usage of alternative cements (ACMs). Some of the more common ACMs include calcium sulfoaluminate cement, calcium aluminate cement, ternary calcium aluminate-calcium sulfate-portland cements, and chemicallyactivated binders, all of which have been shown to have lower carbon footprints than ordinary portland cement (OPC). However, the durability, and more specifically, the shrinkage behavior, of these cements has not been adequately examined, and must be better understood and able to be controlled before ACM concrete can be effectively used in the field. As a first step in increase understanding of shrinkage in ACMs, this paper examines chemical, autogenous, and drying shrinkage in the ACMs listed above. Results show that, despite greater quantities of chemical shrinkage, CSA, CAC, and chemically activated fly ash binder undergo less autogenous and drying shrinkage than OPC.


12345...>>

Results Per Page 




Please enter this 5 digit unlock code on the web page.