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  • The International Concrete Abstracts Portal is an ACI led collaboration with leading technical organizations from within the international concrete industry and offers the most comprehensive collection of published concrete abstracts.

International Concrete Abstracts Portal

Showing 1-5 of 28 Abstracts search results

Document: 

SP243-01

Date: 

April 1, 2007

Author(s):

C.-S. Shon, D. Saylak, D.G. Zollinger, and A.K. Mukhopadhyay

Publication:

Symposium Papers

Volume:

243

Abstract:

The roadside safety barrier is a protective barrier that is erected around a racetrack or in the middle of a dual-lane highway in order to reduce the severity of accidents. Recently, interest in portable roadside safety barriers has heightened the interest in the development of a low-cost and high-performance alternative to the conventional safety barrier system. A study has been undertaken to characterize fresh and hardened properties of flue gas desulfurization (FGD) cellular concrete (CC) using foaming admixture towards the development of a lightweight roadside safety barrier. Test results indicate that FGD CC using a foaming admixture can be effectively used in manufacturing lightweight roadside safety barriers.

DOI:

10.14359/18739


Document: 

SP226-01

Date: 

March 1, 2005

Author(s):

F. H. Fouad and J. Dembowski

Publication:

Symposium Papers

Volume:

226

Abstract:

Autoclaved aerated concrete (AAC) is a lightweight uniform cellular material, first developed in Sweden in 1929. Since that time, AAC building components have been widely used in Europe and other parts of the world. Until recently, however, AAC was relatively unknown to the United States precast construction market. Today, AAC is gaining rapid acceptance in the United States due primarily to increasing energy cost and environmental concerns. Although AAC is a well-recognized building material in Europe, very little research work has been done on American-produced AAC components. The goal of the testing program was to further develop the database of the material properties and structural behavior of American-made AAC by testing plain AAC elements from three different manufacturers. Manufacturers and designers will be provided with information that will help to promote AAC as a reliable engineered construction material in the U.S. Tests performed on the plain AAC consisted of compressive strength, flexural tensile strength, shear strength, and modulus of elasticity.

DOI:

10.14359/14388


Document: 

SP226

Date: 

March 1, 2005

Author(s):

Editors: Caijun Shi and Fouad H. Fouad

Publication:

Symposium Papers

Volume:

226

Abstract:

SP-226 Since its inception more than 80 years ago, autoclaved aerated concrete (AAC) has enjoyed a reputation for excellent thermal insulation, acoustic, and fire-resistant properties due to its low density and cellular structure. The production and use of AAC in the United States, however, did not start until the mid 1990s. To promote and encourage the use of AAC and other ultra-lightweight concrete, ACI Committee 523, Cellular Concrete, and ACI Committee 229, Controlled Low-Strength Materials, organized a technical session on "Controlled-Density/Controlled-Strength Concrete Materials at the 2003 ACI Spring Convention in Vancouver, Canada, and a session on "Aerated Concrete - An Innovative Building Solution" at the 2003 ACI Fall Convention in Boston. Thirteen papers were presented at these two technical sessions covering a wide range of practical case studies and research projects on different types of ultra-lightweight concretes, with particular focus on AAC. These papers should be of interest to the practicing engineers, educators, and researchers in that they demonstrate the effective use of AAC as well as other types of ultra-lightweight concrete materials. This special publication (SP) contains eight of the 13 papers presented at the session. Six of the papers deal with AAC and cover a wide variety of topics including material properties, structural design, seismic performance, and design examples. The other two papers address the acoustic and structural properties of foamed and/or aerated lightweight concretes cured at room temperature.

DOI:

10.14359/14359


Document: 

SP226-04

Date: 

March 1, 2005

Author(s):

R. E. Klingner, J. E. Tanner, J. L. Varela, M. Brightman, J. Argudo, and U. Cancino

Publication:

Symposium Papers

Volume:

226

Abstract:

This paper summarizes the initial phases of the technical justification for proposed design provisions for AAC structures in the US. It is divided into two parts. The first part gives general background information, and presents an overall design strategy. Autoclaved aerated concrete (AAC), a lightweight cementitious material originally developed in Europe more than 70 years ago and now widely used around the world, has recently been introduced into the US construction market. AAC elements can contain conventional reinforcement in grouted cores, either alone or with factory-installed reinforcement. To facilitate the use of AAC in the US market, an integrated seismic-qualification program has been carried out, involving general seismic design provisions, specific element design provisions, and material specifications. The second part describes the design and testing of a suite of 14 AAC shear wall specimens, with aspect ratios from 0.6 to 3, under in-plane reversed cyclic loads at the University of Texas at Austin. The results of these tests have been used to develop predictive models and reliable design equations for AAC shear walls, the primary lateral force-resisting element of AAC structural systems.

DOI:

10.14359/14391


Document: 

SP226-03

Date: 

March 1, 2005

Author(s):

F. H. Fouad and J. Dembowski

Publication:

Symposium Papers

Volume:

226

Abstract:

Autoclaved aerated concrete (AAC) is a lightweight uniform cellular material, first developed in Sweden in 1929. Since that time, plain and reinforced AAC building components have been widely used in Europe and other parts of the world. Until recently, however, AAC was relatively unknown to the United States precast construction market. Today, AAC prefabricated elements are gaining rapid acceptance in the United States due primarily to increasing energy cost, environmental concerns, and the ease of construction using AAC elements. Although AAC is a well-recognized building material in Europe, very little research work has been done on U.S.-produced AAC products. The primary objective of this work was to study the structural behavior of U.S.-made reinforced AAC elements. The laboratory test program included most commonly used reinforced AAC elements: floor panels, lintels, and wall panels. Two U.S. manufacturers supplied the AAC elements. Floor panels and lintels were tested in bending, whereas the wall panels were tested under axial or eccentric loading. The ultimate load capacity, cracking, deflection, and failure mode were observed and recorded for each test. The results provide a database that will be used to refine the analytical methods for the structural design of reinforced AAC elements. This information is needed to enhance AAC design methodologies and lay the foundation for establishing AAC as a reliable engineered construction material in the U.S.

DOI:

10.14359/14390


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