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  • The International Concrete Abstracts Portal is an ACI led collaboration with leading technical organizations from within the international concrete industry and offers the most comprehensive collection of published concrete abstracts.

International Concrete Abstracts Portal

Showing 1-5 of 12 Abstracts search results

Document: 

SP99-04

Date: 

May 1, 1987

Author(s):

J. J. Fontana, M. Steinberg, and W. Reams

Publication:

Symposium Papers

Volume:

99

Abstract:

Lightweight polymer concrete composites have been developed with excellent insulating properties. The composites consist of lightweight aggregates such as expanded perlites, multicellular glass nodules, or hollow alumina silicate microspheres bound together with unsaturated polyester or epoxy resins. These composites, known as insulating polymer concrete (IPC), have thermal conductivities from 0.09 to 0.19 Btu/hr-ft-F. Compressive strengths, depending on the aggregates used, range from 1000 to 6000 psi. These materials can be precast or cast-in-place on concrete substrates. Recently, it has been demonstrated that these materials can also by sprayed onto concrete and other substrates. An overlay application of IPC is currently underway as dike insulation at an LNG storage tank facility. The composites have numerous potentials in the construction industry, such as insulating building blocks or prefabricated insulating wall panels.

DOI:

10.14359/2377


Document: 

SP99-03

Date: 

May 1, 1987

Author(s):

J. J. Fontana

Publication:

Symposium Papers

Volume:

99

Abstract:

The corrosion of reinforcing steel embedded in concrete causes cracks and delamination in the concrete. The application of impressed current cathodic protection utilizing electrically conductive polymer concrete to distribute the current across concrete bridge deck surfaces is gradually becoming a standard practice in the highway industry. To protect the bridge substructures, a sprayable electrically conductive polymer concrete coating is being developed. This thin coating has a very low resistivity and can distribute the cathodic protection current across the concrete surfaces that are to be protected.

DOI:

10.14359/2369


Document: 

SP99-10

Date: 

May 1, 1987

Author(s):

S. Popovics

Publication:

Symposium Papers

Volume:

99

Abstract:

Polymer-modified concretes were subjected to four different curing methods to see the effects of various moisture conditions on their strength developments. Three epoxies and one latex were included in the investigation. One test series was prepared with each polymer and was then repeated with the addition of a chloride-free accelerator. The strength results were compared to strengths of concretes of the same composition but without polymer. The comparison shows that wet conditions do reduce the compressive strengths of polymer-modified concretes, the magnitude of which is greatly influenced by the quality of polymer used. These strength reductions, however, can be counterbalanced by a suitable accelerator.

DOI:

10.14359/2436


Document: 

SP99-05

Date: 

May 1, 1987

Author(s):

M. GierloffI and P., Schimmelwitz

Publication:

Symposium Papers

Volume:

99

Abstract:

Polymer-modified concretes have been subjected to various climate conditions over seven years to find out differences in their hardening characteristics and in particular, the influence of temperature and moisture on the development of strength and elasticity. Generally, the resistance of concrete to long-time exposure conditions is clearly improved by the investigated dispersions, regardless of their generic types. This could be recognized more by the change in the dynamic modulus than by the compression test, which may pretend sound materials while the dynamic modulus points out structural defects. To compare dynamic moduli, the content of moisture has to be taken into account. A special correlation between moisture content, density, and the change of dynamic modulus of elasticity has been given.

DOI:

10.14359/2386


Document: 

SP99-11

Date: 

May 1, 1987

Author(s):

N. RaaziI, D. L. Wheat, and D. W. Fowler

Publication:

Symposium Papers

Volume:

99

Abstract:

One brand of polymer concrete beams reinforced with fiberglass rods were tested and evaluated in simple flexure. Testing was carried out by the applying of two equal loads symmetrically placed about the center line of the beam on simply supported spans of 51, 63, and 72 in. The distance of the load points from the center line of the beams was varied to change the available development length for the reinforcing rod. The primary experimental data consisted of strains measured by means of electrical resistance strain gages placed on the surface of the polymer concrete and along the reinforcing rod. These strains were used to establish cracking strains and bond strengths for the beams tested. The results indicate a range of values for cracking strains and bond strengths, the lowest cracking strain being 370 psi and the lowest bond strength, 434 psi.

DOI:

10.14359/2451


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