ABOUT THE INTERNATIONAL CONCRETE ABSTRACTS PORTAL

  • The International Concrete Abstracts Portal is an ACI led collaboration with leading technical organizations from within the international concrete industry and offers the most comprehensive collection of published concrete abstracts.

International Concrete Abstracts Portal

Showing 1-5 of 19 Abstracts search results

Document: 

SP72-13

Date: 

December 1, 1981

Author(s):

W. E. Fluhr

Publication:

Symposium Papers

Volume:

72

Abstract:

Many educators andeducationalinstitutions are examining their fundamental beliefs about what constitutes an education to prepare graduates for the twenty-first century. More and more universities are returnin g to a core curriculum for all students as a mans of introducing graduates to abodyofknmledge too important for any graduate to miss. In the technological world of today and of the future, there is an urgent need for all college graduates to understand the basis of technology in their liberal education. I recommend that a dynamically balanced core curriculum for all students be composed of courses from humani ties, science and mathematics, social science, and engineering. These specifically designed core courses in engineering for all undergraduates would have three purposes: (1) to provide an understanding of the application of science and mathematics to the benefit of mankind, (2) to provide an understanding of the engineering method which could be used as an approach to the solution of many different classes of societal problems, and (3) to prepare students for a world of accelerating technological change and thus instill in them the understanding that education must be a continuing process. Engineering educators must assume the responsibility to participate in the general education of all undergraduate students.

DOI:

10.14359/6765


Document: 

SP72-04

Date: 

December 1, 1981

Author(s):

W. G. Corley, A. E. Fiorato, and R. G. Oesterle

Publication:

Symposium Papers

Volume:

72

Abstract:

This paper presents experimental data on strength and deformation capacity of isolated structural walls. The data are applicable to walls used as lateral load resisting elements for wind or earthquake forces. The objective is to describe variables that influence strength and deformation capacity. Effects of load history, section shape, vertical and horizontal reinforcement confinement reinforcement, moment-to-shear ratio, axial compressive stress, and concrete strength are considered. Deformation capacities obtained from tests are discussed in terms of overall limits on lateral drift.

DOI:

10.14359/6756


Document: 

SP72-17

Date: 

December 1, 1981

Author(s):

Walter P. Moore, Jr.

Publication:

Symposium Papers

Volume:

72

Abstract:

A comparison is made of the reinforced concrete Synopsis: design of two long low-rise corporate headquarter buildings in Houston. Both buildings utilize pour strips to completely eliminate in one case and minimize in the second case the number of expansion joints. The process which was followed to eliminate the expansion joints included a comprehensive computer analysis of temperature effects. This analysis gave the forces for which additional reinforcing was required. Strips of concrete through the buildings at all levels were omitted to allow the initial shrinkage and creep to take place and then the strips were filled in. One building was completed in 1977 and has developed no significant cracks while the second building is now under construction.

DOI:

10.14359/6769


Document: 

SP72-09

Date: 

December 1, 1981

Author(s):

J. G. MacGregor

Publication:

Symposium Papers

Volume:

72

Abstract:

The ACI Building Code has become more and more complex as engineers and plan checkers have insisted that every eventuality be covered in the code. Three possible ways of simplifying codes are discussed. These include: (a) rearrangement of the code by components rather than stress states, (b) use of a performance code format plus a recommended practice and (c) use of a two-tiered code. The paper suggests that (a) and (c) are most likely to be successful at this time.

DOI:

10.14359/6761


Document: 

SP72-10

Date: 

December 1, 1981

Author(s):

M. Daniel Vanderbilt

Publication:

Symposium Papers

Volume:

72

Abstract:

A reinforced concrete building may be approximately analyzed as a series of crossing plane frames. The beam-column connections can be modeled using either the lateral-torsional member or equivalent beam width techniques. The lateral-torsion-almember definition and associated frame and member modeling rules which comprise the equivalent frame method of ACI 318-77 were calibrated against tests of real structures while methods of computing effective beam widths are based largely on theoretical analyses of elastic plates. Comparisons of the two methods in analyzing a test building for lateral loads are given. Both methods can be forced to produce computed deflections which agree favorably with test data. However, compatibility of lateral de-flections of separately analyzed parallel frames at the same floor level is not assured. Two methods for forcing compatibility of lateral deflections at each floor level of a building are described and shown to produce computed deflections which compare favorably with test data. Limitations of both equivalent frame and equivalent beam width methods are discussed.

DOI:

10.14359/6762


1234

Results Per Page