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International Concrete Abstracts Portal

Showing 1-5 of 14 Abstracts search results

Document: 

SP204-05

Date: 

August 1, 2001

Author(s):

A. Mirmiran, S. Kulkarni, Il. Miller, M. Hastak, 6. Shahrooz, and Il. Castrodale

Publication:

Symposium Papers

Volume:

204

Abstract:

Precast prestressed girder bridges can be made continuous for live load if the deck and diaphragm are cast with sufficient positive and negative moment reinforcements. The continuity eliminates costly joints and enhances seismic performance, structural integrity and overall durability of the structure. If diaphragm is poured with sufficient negative moment reinforcement before the deck is cast, continuity may also apply to the dead load of the slab. Although, connection of the girders at the diaphragm varies from state to state, it generally consists of bent bars or bent strands. Also, a short length of the girder may be embedded into the diaphragm. The continuity connection is a doubly reinforced section, which requires a time-dependent analysis including differential shrinkage, creep due to prestressing and dead loads, and temperature effects. These time-dependent effects can result in considerable positive restraining moments at the supports, which can in turn crack the diaphragm or pull the girder out of the diaphragm. These positive moment cracks are not only unsightly, but may also result in durability issues for the bridge. Furthermore, it questions the integrity of the continuity connection. The paper examines the extent of positive moment cracking based on field observations, time-dependent analysis, and previous studies.

DOI:

10.14359/10816


Document: 

SP204-12

Date: 

August 1, 2001

Author(s):

A. M. Vaysburd, R. W. Poston, and J. E. McDonald

Publication:

Symposium Papers

Volume:

204

Abstract:

Cracking in concrete repair systems is one of the truly critical phenomena of repair pathology responsible for corrosion, deterioration and failure. The problem of repair cracking has become widespread not only with respect lo severe environments which are intensifying restrained volume change stresses but also with respect to repairs in relatively benign environments. Cracking accelerates the penetration of aggressive substances into the concrete and repair material from the exterior environment which in turn aggravates any one or a number of various mechanisms of deterioration. Moisture transport mechanism in the repaired structures is a tool for transferring an outer standard environment into an inner environment, and from one inner environment (existing substrate) into another (repair material). The crack resistance of concrete repair is bearing on three equally important elephants: (I) design details and specifications; (2) repair materials; (3) in-situ workmanship and quality control This study demonstrates that the properties of cementitious repair materials have to be engineered for dimensional compatibility with existing concrete to improve their resistance to cracking. How good should the cementitious composite material used for repair of existing concrete structures be? How good is good enough? The paper summarized the factors involved and approaches taken when selecting cementitous repair materials. Performance criteria is presented for the selection of dimensionally compatible repair materials and standard material data sheet protocol. The recommended approach can enable material quality improvement, more accurate service life prediction, and satisfactory performance of repaired concrete structures during their intended service life.

DOI:

10.14359/10823


Document: 

SP204-13

Date: 

August 1, 2001

Author(s):

M. Saatcioglu

Publication:

Symposium Papers

Volume:

204

Abstract:

A reconnaissance visit was conducted to Turkey shortly after the August 17, 1999 Earthquake to investigate the performance of concrete structures. The dominant form of construction in the area was reinforced concrete frames, infilled with masonry walls. Extensive cracking and damage was observed in most structures located in the disaster area. This paper presents an overview of the types of cracking that can be expected after a seismic activity, as well as those observed after the August 17, 1999 Earthquake in Turkey. Causes of seismic damage are discussed with examples. A brief review of the seismological aspects of the earthquake and the overall performance of reinforced concrete buildings are provided.

DOI:

10.14359/10824


Document: 

SP204-10

Date: 

August 1, 2001

Author(s):

J .K .Buffenbarger, C. K. Nmai, and M. A. Miltenberger

Publication:

Symposium Papers

Volume:

204

Abstract:

Drying shrinkage cracking can adversely affect the aesthetics, durability, and serviceability of reinforced concrete structures, thereby negating some of the benefits provided by high-performance concretes. Developed years ago but relatively new to the construction industry, shrinkage-reducing admixtures (SRAs) have been shown to provide significant reductions in concrete drying shrinkage and subsequent cracking. The potential benefits that SRAs provide have resulted in increased use of these products in the past few years. In this paper, data from laboratory testing and field investigations of SRA-treated concrete mixtures and their use in a few projects where watertightness was desired are presented and discussed. The findings of visual inspections of the projects performed shortly after construction and after a year in service will also be presented. The information to be presented verify the drying shrinkage reduction characteristics of SRAs and show that these innovative admixtures can provide substantial benefits with regards to improving watertightness and overall serviceability of reinforced concrete structures.

DOI:

10.14359/10821


Document: 

SP204-07

Date: 

August 1, 2001

Author(s):

A. Bentur, N. S. Berke, M. P. Dallaire, and T. A. Durning

Publication:

Symposium Papers

Volume:

204

Abstract:

Shrinkage reducing admixtures (SRA’s) are a new type of admixtures which is effective in reducing the drying shrinkage of concrete. SRA performance has typically been evaluated on the basis of unrestrained drying shrinkage tests. However, it is usually the cracking performance of concrete when shrinkage is restrained that is of primary interest to the marketplace. The current paper presents an evaluation of SRA’s based on several parameters: free shrinkage, tensile stresses which develop in a uniaxially restrained rig, and the sensitivity to cracking in such conditions. The positive influence of SRA’s on all of these three parameters is demonstrated. A comparison is made between the effect of SRA and of low-volume, polypropylene fiber reinforcement. The latter is known to be effective in controlling early age plastic shrinkage cracking. The present data show that in the case of hardened concrete, after one day of curing, low volumes of fibers do not give any advantage, and it is in this range where the SRA is effective. Thus, the two types of additives can complement each other: the fibers are efficient in controlling plastic shrinkage cracking while the SRA can take over the role of crack control in the hardened concrete, where low volume-low modulus fibers are not effective.

DOI:

10.14359/10818


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