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Showing 1-5 of 26 Abstracts search results

Document: 

SP189

Date: 

January 1, 2000

Author(s):

Editor: H.G. Russell

Publication:

Symposium Papers

Volume:

189

Abstract:

A total of 25 papers are included in this Symposium Publication on HPC. The general topics include HPC bridges, HPC structural lightweight concrete, material science of HPC, and structural safety of HPC. Note: The individual papers are also available as .pdf downloads.. Please click on the following link to view the papers available, or call 248.848.3800 to order. SP189

DOI:

10.14359/14224


Document: 

SP189-06

Date: 

January 1, 2000

Author(s):

M. L. Ralls

Publication:

Symposium Papers

Volume:

189

Abstract:

In Texas, two overpasses have been constructed with high-performance concrete (HPC) in projects sponsored by the Federal Highway Administration (FHWA) and the Texas Department of Transportation (TxDOT), in cooperation with the Center for Transportation Research at the University of Texas at Austin (UT). Using the knowledge gained from the first two projects, the UT researchers and TxDOT personnel developed a durability specification for bridge decks and substructures. Several bridge construction contracts with normal strength HPC decks have incorporated the new durability specification, and more are planned. The durability specification will be updated as research and implementation continue.

DOI:

10.14359/5847


Document: 

SP189-08

Date: 

January 1, 2000

Author(s):

J. F. Speck and R. G Burg

Publication:

Symposium Papers

Volume:

189

Abstract:

This paper presents three examples of low density, all lightweight aggregate concrete applications. These applications represent "high performance" concrete because the concrete properties could no be achieved with the usual materials and methods. Each example used rotary kiln produced expanded clay lightweight aggregates to obtain concrete densities as low as 75 lb/ft3. Where required, relatively high strength concrete (6000 psi) was produced. In another instance, the compressive strength was purposely limited to less than 3000 psi. In each case the concrete met the needs of the user, resulting in significant cost savings.

DOI:

10.14359/5849


Document: 

SP189-01

Date: 

January 1, 2000

Author(s):

M. W. Beacham

Publication:

Symposium Papers

Volume:

189

Abstract:

The AASHTO “Task Force on Strategic Highway Research Program (SHRP) Implementation” developed and instituted the Lead State Program in 1996. The mission of the Task Force was to optimize ways in which SHRP technologies could be implemented at the state level. The Task Force understood the benefits of mutual cooperation in sharing resources, working as teams, and collectively implementing the technologies. In order to achieve their mission the Task Force developed the concept of “Lead States Teams”. A “Lead States Team” is a group of states that are willing to take the lead and assist in the implementation of specific, targeted SHRP technologies in which they have interest and have gained some practical experience.

DOI:

10.14359/5842


Document: 

SP189-10

Date: 

January 1, 2000

Author(s):

E. J. Garboczi and D. P. Bentz

Publication:

Symposium Papers

Volume:

189

Abstract:

Portland cement concrete is a composite material, where the matrix consist of porland cement paste. Cement paste forms from the hydration reaction of portland cement with water. The microstructure of cement paste changes drastically over time period of about one week, with slower changes occurring over subsequent weeks to months. The effect of this hydration process on the changing microstructure can be represented using computer simulation techniques applied to three dimensional digital image-based models. Percolation theory can be used to understand the developing microstructure of cement paste in terms of three percolation thresholds: the set point, capillary porosity percolation, and the percolation of the C-S-H phase. The percolation of the interfacial transition zones also plays an important role in concrete microstructure, and can be displayed using computer simulation models. These percolation aspects help determine the transport properties and therefore the durability and service life of concrete.

DOI:

10.14359/5851


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