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International Concrete Abstracts Portal

Showing 1-5 of 65 Abstracts search results

Document: 

SP164-12

Date: 

November 1, 1996

Author(s):

John A. Van Lund

Publication:

Symposium Papers

Volume:

164

Abstract:

Describes the Washington State Department of Transportation's (WSDOT) experience with fabric pad slide bearings for concrete bridges. Fabric pad design criteria are reviewed. A recent WSDOT project is presented as a case study. Sliding fabric pad bearings are used at the end piers of a four-span concrete segmental bridge. These bearings are designed for a service load of 270 tons with compressive stress of 9.3 MPa. Lateral loads are resisted by transverse concrete girder stops. Load versus rotation discrepancies between AASHTO LRFD, WSDOT, and industry criteria are compared. The current AASHTO LRFD load versus rotation design criteria may be too restrictive for fabric pad bearings. WSDOT's design methodology and costs are presented. Additional research and testing are needed to develop performance-based AASHTO LRFD design specifications. AASHTO material and testing requirements for fabric pad slide bearings are needed so that bridge designers can design and specify these bearings with greater confidence. Fabric pad bearings are capable of supporting high loads. In addition, fabric pad bearings are durable, simple to install, and relatively maintenance-free. The paper concludes that these bearings are an economical alternative to more expensive disc, pot, and spherical bridge bearings.

DOI:

10.14359/1389


Document: 

SP164-02

Date: 

November 1, 1996

Author(s):

William H. Le Van

Publication:

Symposium Papers

Volume:

164

Abstract:

Important and often overlooked parts of any building or structure are the systems located behind the walls, under the floors, and in the ceilings of these structures. Installed when the framework of a building is just taking shape, these systems provide the occupants of the building with potable water and remove the waste water safely, quietly, and efficiently. Because these systems are installed within walls, floors, and ceilings, the reliability and longevity of the systems must be equal to the expected life of the building. Two such systems are the sanitary and stormwater piping systems found in all buildings. The wastewater system removes wastewater from the bathrooms, kitchens, and restrooms located inside these structures. The stormwater or rainwater systems drain the exposed roofs, patios, and terraces of rainwater, melted snow, and ice. Both systems use cast iron soil pipe, which is joined with varying types of fittings, within the building's structure. Both systems operate in nonpressure applications, using gravity to remove the rainwater and wastewater from the building. A necessary part of these piping systems is a reliable, cost efficient method of joining the pipe and fittings. This paper traces the history of cast iron soil pipe and discusses design changes in pipe and fittings and the development of applicable standards.

DOI:

10.14359/1388


Document: 

SP164-48

Date: 

November 1, 1996

Author(s):

Agostino Marioni

Publication:

Symposium Papers

Volume:

164

Abstract:

The paper describes an innovative antiseismic device based on steel elements subject to yielding. Through a peculiar geometry of the dissipators and the selection of a particular type of steel the device can grant superior performance for fatigue life and regularity of the hysteresis cycles. The paper describes the tests at reduced and full scale to assess the behaviour of the device and an important application under execution in Turkey.

DOI:

10.14359/14334


Document: 

SP164V1

Date: 

November 1, 1996

Author(s):

Editor: Barrie Atkinson

Publication:

Symposium Papers

Volume:

164

Abstract:

SP-164(V1) The Fourth World Congress on Joint Sealants and Bearing Systems in Concrete Structures will enhance the general understanding of these systems and introduce entirely new concepts developed to cater to the latest seismic code requirements. This conference was held in Sacramento, California on September 29 through October 3, 1996.

DOI:

10.14359/14204


Document: 

SP164-46

Date: 

November 1, 1996

Author(s):

Y. Arditzoglou, J. A. Yura and A. H. Haines

Publication:

Symposium Papers

Volume:

164

Abstract:

The 1992 AASHTO Design Specification for Bridges recommends the use of shear modulus rather than durometer in specifying the elastomer in bearings for bridges. The value of the specified shear modulus can then be used directly in the design formulas to predict bearing displacements and stresses in the full size bearing. A study was undertaken to evaluate the difference, if any, between the shear modulus from the ASTM D-4014 quadruple shear test on a small sample of the elastomer and the shear modulus from the full size bearing. Reinforced bearings were ordered from three different manufacturers with a specified shear stiffness of 100 psi (0.69 MPa) and 200 psi (1.38 MPa). The effect of the ASTM specimen size and the method of computing the shear modulus were evaluated. It was found that the ASTM test gave much higher values of shear modulus than measured in the full size tests (sometimes over 30%). Some of the reasons for the difference are given along with some recommendations for changes in the ASTM method and the AASHTO Specification for elastomeric bearings.

DOI:

10.14359/14332


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