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International Concrete Abstracts Portal

Showing 1-5 of 13 Abstracts search results

Document: 

SP147

Date: 

September 1, 1994

Author(s):

Editor: Daniel P. Abrams / Sponsored by: Joint ACI-ASCE Committee 442

Publication:

Symposium Papers

Volume:

147

Abstract:

Variations in masonry construction techniques from country to country exists today. Basic terminology used to describe masonry construction is different throughout American countries. This technical publication provides an opportunity to correlate performance of various masonry construction methods so that more can be learned about the sensitivities, or commonalities, inherent in the construction techniques that are used. This timely publication is a set of technical papers on various related topics authored by engineers from various North, Central, and South American countries. This special publication will be of interest to designers, constructors and specifiers. Note: The individual papers are also available as .pdf downloads.. Please click on the following link to view the papers available, or call 248.848.3800 to order. SP147

DOI:

10.14359/14187


Document: 

SP147-10

Date: 

September 1, 1994

Author(s):

L. E. Garcia and L. E. Yamin

Publication:

Symposium Papers

Volume:

147

Abstract:

A review of the use of masonry in Columbia is presented. The importance of masonry construction is emphasized. The masonry structural systems prevalent in the country are discussed. A description of the materials employed in masonry construction in Columbia is given, including physical and mechanical properties. Reinforced masonry, confined masonry, unreinforced masonry, and nonstructural uses of masonry are discussed. Recent damaging Columbian earthquakes are presented. The behavior of masonry structures during these earthquakes, as well as their influence on the requirements of the Columbian Building Code, are given. The empirical design permitted by the code is indicated. Construction and inspection practice are briefly outlined. The procedures for evaluating and strengthening masonry structures are addressed. Past and current research on masonry is highlighted.

DOI:

10.14359/4388


Document: 

SP147-02

Date: 

September 1, 1994

Author(s):

C. Casabbone

Publication:

Symposium Papers

Volume:

147

Abstract:

Presents the general description of masonry systems and construction practices in the Americas. As the most important use of masonry is the construction of midheight buildings destined to housing, emphasis is given in this chapter on the use of masonry in the construction of bearing wall diaphragm buildings.

DOI:

10.14359/4375


Document: 

SP147-06

Date: 

September 1, 1994

Author(s):

M. Bruneau

Publication:

Symposium Papers

Volume:

147

Abstract:

Presents the Canadian practice for the design of earthquake-resistant masonry structures, problems germane to the existing unreinforced masonryinfrastructure never designed to resist earthquakes, and masonry-related earthquake-engineering research efforts in Canada. The evolution of Canadian masonry construction, size of the industry, building code and detailing requirements, design methods, materials, and allowable stresses are reviewed for both unreinforced and reinforced masonry. Examples of masonry buildings damaged during past Canadian earthquakes are presented. For the seismic evaluation of existing masonry structures in Canada, issues pertaining to building code, detailing, seismic retrofit ordinances, heritage buildings, and Eastern Canadian seismicity are formulated from a Canadian perspective. An overview of ongoing research activities initiated to tackle some of these issues, and a preliminary outline of some research findings and needs, are also presented.

DOI:

10.14359/4385


Document: 

SP147-08

Date: 

September 1, 1994

Author(s):

R. Meli

Publication:

Symposium Papers

Volume:

147

Abstract:

Confined masonry walls constitute the basic vertical structural system for residential buildings up to five stories high in Mexico. The practice of their design and construction, their performance during recent earthquakes, and the changes in code regulations and in design and construction practice imposed by the lessons learned from the 1985 earthquake are discussed briefly. Also summarized is the experimental research that constitutes the basis for present design regulations. The comprehensive research program carried out since the late 1960s includes tests on units and mortars, small masonry subassemblages, full-scale walls, and complete structural systems.

DOI:

10.14359/4368


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