ABOUT THE INTERNATIONAL CONCRETE ABSTRACTS PORTAL

  • The International Concrete Abstracts Portal is an ACI led collaboration with leading technical organizations from within the international concrete industry and offers the most comprehensive collection of published concrete abstracts.

International Concrete Abstracts Portal

Showing 1-5 of 33 Abstracts search results

Document: 

SP109-20

Date: 

August 1, 1988

Author(s):

P. F. Adams, T. J. E. Zimmerman, and J. G. MacGregor

Publication:

Symposium Papers

Volume:

109

Abstract:

The exterior walls of arctic oil and gas production structures will be subject to large, concentrated ice forces. Composite steel/concrete walls have been proposed as a cost-effective solution to resisting these forces. The research discussed in this paper has investigated the behavior and failure mechanisms of composite walls, so that recommendations can be made concerning analysis and design methods and effective construction details. The research involved the development of design-oriented ultimate strength models, as well as the physical testing of composite wall specimens. Results are presented in this paper for tests on composite beam and composite slab specimens. The high strength and great ductility of this form of construction is demonstrated. Effective design methods utilizing empirical design equations and limit analysis plasticity solutions are given.

DOI:

10.14359/3075


Document: 

SP109-01

Date: 

August 1, 1988

Author(s):

P. K. Mehta

Publication:

Symposium Papers

Volume:

109

Abstract:

From recently reported case histories of concrete deterioration in seawater, the author has taken a fresh look at the conclusion presented on this subject at the last CANMET/ACI Conference on the Performance of Concrete in Marine Environment. It is confirmed again that between seawater and the constituents of hydrated cement paste, harmful chemical reactions such as carbonation, sulfate attack, and magnesium ion attack can be limited to the surface when well known measures to assure low permeability of concrete have been put into practice. From the standpoint of permeability of concrete, the topics discussed in detail include selection of materials and mixture specifications, concreting practice, and control of in-service cracking due to thermal gradients, frost attack, improper loading conditions, fatigue, and corrosion of the embedded steel in concrete. The ACI and FIP Recommended Practice for offshore concrete structures and recent field experience from the North Sea are compared, to highlight the issues that are relevant to long-time durability of concrete. Since high-strength concretes (50 to 70 MPa) containing water-reducing and mineral admixtures are relatively impermeable, in the opinion of the author they offer an excellent solution to the problem of durability of concrete in seawater environment.

DOI:

10.14359/1899


Document: 

SP109-30

Date: 

August 1, 1988

Author(s):

T. A. Holm, T. W. Bremner, and A. Vaysburd

Publication:

Symposium Papers

Volume:

109

Abstract:

Concrete ships and bridges incorporating structural lightweight concrete were examined for durability with particular attention given to depth of carbonation. The profile of the carbonation front was determined for these mature structures in or over sea water, and the carbonation front was found not to approach the steel reinforcing even after several decades of exposure. Factors affecting the rate of carbonation are discussed and recommendations are given to limit the extent of carbonation.

DOI:

10.14359/2114


Document: 

SP109-15

Date: 

August 1, 1988

Author(s):

S. G. Millard

Publication:

Symposium Papers

Volume:

109

Abstract:

Coastal defenses in the United Kingdom have often been constructed using natural stone armor or plain concrete armor. This paper reports on the novel use of slender section reinforced concrete units in the marine splash zone. A program of monitoring the durability performance of the coastal defenses was commenced by the University of Liverpool in 1985. A visual survey together with electrical potential and resistivity monitoring of a sample of 51 units is conducted annually. Overall, the slender reinforced concrete units are performing very well both hydraulically and structurally. Some minor impact damage soon after construction has been easily repaired using the steel reinforcement as a bonding key. The results of three years of potential monitoring have shown that the steel reinforcement has been passivated in all but one of the sample units. The resistivity monitoring has shown that the fly ash concrete has a significantly higher resistivity than the ordinary concrete and hence; its use should lead to lower rates of corrosion. Further studies on the durability of reinforced concrete in the splash zone are in progress.

DOI:

10.14359/1996


Document: 

SP109-21

Date: 

August 1, 1988

Author(s):

S. Nishibayashi, S. Hideshima, S. Negami, and M. Takada

Publication:

Symposium Papers

Volume:

109

Abstract:

Effect of chemical and mineral admixtures on the durability of concrete in an undersea environment has been studied. Addition of slag and slag-like materials and water-reducing agent improves the durability of concrete. However, alkali-silica aggregate reaction aggravated by the marine environment and the corrosion of reinforcing steel bars are enhanced. By the addition of rust inhibitors, these effects can be controlled.

DOI:

10.14359/2025


12345...>>

Results Per Page 




Please enter this 5 digit unlock code on the web page.