Case-Specific Parametric Analysis as Research-Directing Tool for Analysis and Design of GFRP-RC Structures

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Title: Case-Specific Parametric Analysis as Research-Directing Tool for Analysis and Design of GFRP-RC Structures

Author(s): Marco Rossini, Eleonora Bruschi, Fabio Matta, Carlo Poggi and Antonio Nanni

Publication: Special Publication

Volume: 327

Issue:

Appears on pages(s): 34.1-34.12

Keywords: concrete; design; flexure; GFRP bars; parametric analysis; safety factors; standards.

Date: 11/1/2018

Abstract:
This paper presents a parametric analysis of the ACI 440 (2015) and AASHTO (2009) algorithms governing the flexural design of a one-way concrete member internally reinforced with glass fiber-reinforced polymer (GFRP) bars. The influence of specific design parameters on the required amount of reinforcement is investigated. The aim is to identify variables and requirements governing the design of a large-section GFRP reinforced concrete (RC) member. The member considered for this case-specific analysis is the reinforced concrete pile cap of the Halls River Bridge (Homosassa, FL), which is deemed representative of large-section GFRP-RC members operating as bent caps in short-span bridges. The influence of four critical parameters on the required amount of reinforcement is assessed. Salient analysis and design implications are discussed with respect to creep and fatigue rupture stress limits, minimum amount of flexural reinforcement, and applicable strength reduction factors. The outcomes of the parametric analysis highlight an untapped potential to reduce the required amount of reinforcement, and prioritize research areas to advance the development of rational design algorithms. Cyclic fatigue and creep rupture are identified as governing mechanisms.