Sessions & Events

 

All sessions and events take place in Central Daylight Time (CDT).
All events take place at the Hyatt Regency New Orleans.

On-demand sessions will be available for viewing in the convention platform/event app under "On-Demand Content" within 24-48 hours of the session premiere. Please note, on-demand sessions are not available for CEU credit. *Denotes on-demand content.


Convention Highlights

Tuesday, March 26, 2024


8:30 AM - 10:30 AM

Moderators: Dr Kejin Wang , Dr Florence Sanchez

Nanoparticles (such as nanosilica, nanoclay, etc.) are used as viscosity modifying agents (VMA) or thixotropic agents to alter rheological properties of 3D printed concrete (3DPC). Nanoparticles can also act as seeds for CSH nucleation to accelerate cement hydration. As a result, nanoparticle-modified 3DPC can possess not only appropriate extrudability and flowability but also proper segregation resistance, shape retention, and buildability for consistent and quality printing. Nanoparticles are also used to densify microstructure and improve the interlayer bond of 3DPC, thus increasing strength and enhancing durability of the 3DPC products. The objectives of this technical session are to (i) summarize recent progress on the use of nanoparticles in 3DPC, (ii) better understand the potential roles of nanoparticles in enhancing the properties of 3DPC, and (iii) discuss perspectives and challenges with the use of nanoparticles in 3DPC.

Learning Objectives:
(1) Review recent research progress and innovations resulting from the use of nanoparticles in 3DPC;
(2) Develop knowledge of the effect of nanoparticles on the properties of 3DPC;
(3) Discuss key issues in the use of nanoparticles in 3DPC applications;
(4) Recognize the benefits and challenges of use of nanoparticles in 3DPC.


8:30 AM - 10:30 AM

Moderator: Hessam AzariJafari

The versatility of concrete can help mitigate the carbon footprint of structures. In this session, concrete stakeholders (including but not limited to materials producers, concrete manufacturers, structural engineers, governments, and contractors) will be educated and informed about the solutions to minimize the environmental impacts of concrete. Basic content and progress toward elevating characteristics, such as, mechanical performance, durability, stiffness, thermal properties, reflectance, and the optimization of these metrics to minimize the carbon footprint in different end-use applications, will be expanded in this session. Speakers will provide their insight and experience about the challenges and opportunities for using available codes and guidelines to achieve a better performance with regards to sustainability issues. Participants will also be informed about the role played by different concrete stakeholders in minimizing the environmental impacts while maintaining the functionality of structures.

Learning Objectives:
(1) Improving the maintenance and repair schedule as well as the stiffness can reduce the life cycle GHG emissions of pavements;
(2) Avoiding overdesign is a significant contributor to decarbonizing the concrete operational emissions;
(3) Increasing the surface albedo of the thermal mass of buildings can significantly reduce the life cycle GHG emissions of buildings;
(4) Improving binder intensity can be performed based on the lessons learned from our past practice to mitigate the embodied emission of concrete.


8:30 AM - 10:30 AM

Moderator: Dr Matthew D D'Ambrosia

The session will focus on the recent developments in the understanding of creep and shrinkage behavior at early ages. Of particular interest will be new concrete types and additives, such as UHPC, 3-D printing, expansive additives, new cements (portland, blended, alternative), SCMs, and admixture technology. Topics of interest include test methods and measurements, material influences, material models, applications, and mitigation. Attendees should include researchers, designers, consultants, contractors, students, educators, and contractors. The mitigation of cracking at early age is a topic with broad interest.

Learning Objectives:
(1) Identify important factors affecting early age creep shrinkage of concrete;
(2) Understand the mechanisms that cause cracking in concrete structures;
(3) Learn about new test methods for characterization of creep and shrinkage;
(4) Learn about techniques for mitigation of cracking in construction.


8:30 AM - 10:30 AM

Moderators: Dr Qingxu Jin, Dr Alvaro R Paul

Ultra-high-performance concrete (UHPC) has been extensively researched and implemented in various infrastructure applications for its superior structural and durability performance. Despite their successful structural level demonstrations, fiber dispersion and orientation remain a concern in the UHPC structure design and applications. The challenge of the fiber orientation in UHPC is due to the fact that it is sensitive to the casting method, size and geometry of element, rebar arrangement, and rheological properties of UHPC mix. The purpose of the session is to present the current efforts on quantifying and characterizing the fiber orientation in real UHPC structures, understanding how casting procedures affect the fiber orientation, and demonstrating impact of fiber orientation on UHPC structure design and performance.

Learning Objectives:
(1) Identify the guidelines provided by construction standards for measuring, controlling, and placing UHPC to manage fiber orientation;
(2) Explain the impact of UHPC rheology on fiber dispersion and distribution, and describe the most advanced techniques for modeling fiber movement in fresh concrete;
(3) Identify the effects of fiber distribution and orientation on the mechanical properties and structural performance of UHPC elements;
(4) Distinguish the relevance of fiber selection for the fire performance of UHPC elements and describe guidelines to enhance fire resistance. 


8:30 AM - 9:30 AM

Moderator: Mr Craig McKee

Walls constructed using Insulating Concrete Forms (ICFs) are resilient, energy efficient, and offer excellent sound insulating properties. ICF walls are used throughout the world for a variety of structures, ranging from single-story to multi-story residences, hotels, educational facilities, and office buildings. This session will aim to provide an introduction to the design, detailing, and construction of walls constructed using ICFs.

Learning Objectives:
(1) Understand what ICF walls are and how they are constructed;
(2) Understand the components and systems commonly used to construct ICF walls;
(3) Understand planning considerations for ICF walls;
(4) Understand the current IBC and ACI design provisions that pertain to the design of ICF walls;
(5) Understanding of fire resistance of ICF walls.


11:00 AM - 1:00 PM

Moderators: Dr Kejin Wang , Dr Florence Sanchez

Nanoparticles (such as nanosilica, nanoclay, etc.) are used as viscosity modifying agents (VMA) or thixotropic agents to alter rheological properties of 3D printed concrete (3DPC). Nanoparticles can also act as seeds for CSH nucleation to accelerate cement hydration. As a result, nanoparticle-modified 3DPC can possess not only appropriate extrudability and flowability but also proper segregation resistance, shape retention, and buildability for consistent and quality printing. Nanoparticles are also used to densify microstructure and improve the interlayer bond of 3DPC, thus increasing strength and enhancing durability of the 3DPC products. The objectives of this technical session are to (i) summarize recent progress on the use of nanoparticles in 3DPC, (ii) better understand the potential roles of nanoparticles in enhancing the properties of 3DPC, and (iii) discuss perspectives and challenges with the use of nanoparticles in 3DPC.

Learning Objectives:
(1) Build skills in improving rheological properties of 3D-printed concrete (3DPC) through nanoparticle modification;
(2) Develop an understanding of the key issues in the 3D printing process of nanoparticle-modified 3DPC;
(3) Investigate innovative techniques for 3D printing of ready-mix concrete containing nanoparticles;
(4) Evaluate the advantages associated with the utilization of nanoparticle-modified 3DPC in enhancing concrete sustainability.


11:00 AM - 1:00 PM

Moderators: Dr Qingxu Jin, Dr Qian Zhang

Ultra-high-performance concrete (UHPC) has been extensively researched and implemented in various infrastructure applications for its superior structural and durability performance. Despite their successful structural level demonstrations, fiber dispersion and orientation remain a concern in the UHPC structure design and applications. The challenge of the fiber orientation in UHPC is due to the fact that it is sensitive to the casting method, size and geometry of element, rebar arrangement, and rheological properties of UHPC mix. The purpose of the session is to present the current efforts on quantifying and characterizing the fiber orientation in real UHPC structures, understanding how casting procedures affect the fiber orientation, and demonstrating impact of fiber orientation on UHPC structure design and performance.

Learning Objectives:
(1) Describe the effect of flow characteristics of UHPC mixtures on fiber orientation and the mechanical performance of structural elements;
(2) Discuss non-destructive techniques for the measurement and control of fiber orientation in UHPC;
(3) Assess the impact of construction procedures on the fiber orientation in UHPC;
(4) Identify cutting-edge techniques developed for measuring the fiber orientation in UHPC structural elements. 


11:00 AM - 1:00 PM

Moderators: Dr Michael C Brown, Dr Soundar Sriram G Balakumaran

Michael Sprinkel, an ACI Fellow, passed away in December 2022. Michael was a pioneer and industry leader in the maintenance, repair, and rehabilitation of highway bridges. He foresaw the critical need for maintaining the existing public bridges in the late 1970’s, when the primary interest was building new structures. His leadership is projected through his work as a member and chairman of several American Concrete Institute (ACI) committees and as a member of its Technical Advisory Committee. His leadership work was recognized by ACI in conferring the Robert E. Philleo Award in 2012 and the Charles S. Whitney Medal in 2021. He also chaired concrete and polymer committees at TRB. Michael received the TRB's K.B. Woods Award for Best Paper in Design and Construction of Transportation Facilities in 1988.

A series of technical sessions are proposed to review Michael Sprinkel's contributions and to highlight current state of practice across his areas of expertise, including durable concrete mixture designs, post-tensioning grouts, bridge deck overlays, and other polymer treatments for concrete preservation.

Learning Objectives:
(1) Report on how concrete mixture design, including latex-modified, self-consolidating and ultra-high performance concretes can ensure durability of concrete structures;
(2) Discuss the mechanical properties and applications of polymers, such as High Molecular Weight Methacrylate, for concrete repairs;
(3) Review methods to evaluate and mitigate grout problems in existing post-tensioned concrete structures;
(4) Explain how service life design and appropriate materials selection can ensure long-term performance of concrete structures.


11:00 AM - 12:00 PM

Moderator: Leandro F. M. Sanchez

Understand the impact of aggregates on the short and long-term performance, as well as on the carbon footprint of concrete.

Learning Objectives:
(1) Explain the importance of aggregates in concrete performance;
(2) Discuss the impact of aggregates in the short and long term performance of concrete;
(3) Discuss the impact of aggregates in concrete durability;
(4) Discuss the impact of aggregates in the carbon footprint of concrete.


11:00 AM - 1:00 PM

Moderator: Phil Diekemper

This session, sponsored by PRO: An ACI Center of Excellence for Advancing Productivity, will focus on constructability concepts for engineers that are rarely learned in formal engineering curriculum. Speakers from many facets of the concrete design and construction community will present case studies, technologies, and practices that are crucial to a new engineer’s knowledge about what makes a project constructable and how their perspective can significantly affect the success of a project.

Learning Objectives
(1) Discuss constructability design concepts for industry experts;
(2) Identify opportunities to improve structural designs for productivity and efficiency;
(3) Recognize the importance of contractor design collaboration in producing the most efficient concrete construction possible;
(4) Develop an understanding that improving construction productivity results in earlier project completions.


11:30 AM - 1:30 PM

$65 U.S. Per Person

Topic: Graduating Sustainable Industrial Decarbonization Solutions from the Laboratory to Real-World Deployments
Speakers: Ana Aday
Description:
Accelerating innovation and integration of industrial decarbonization technology solutions is crucial for achieving industry-wide net-zero greenhouse gas emissions targets. This can be accomplished in various ways through increased utilization of low-embodied carbon materials and the adoption of advanced manufacturing techniques in construction practices. At the National Renewable Energy Laboratory (NREL), we facilitate dialogue and action across all sectors to uncover industry needs to inform innovation, and explore ways we can help with implementation of emerging solutions in the real world. As an applied laboratory, NREL sits between academia and industry to fully bridge the gap from foundational science research to examining the feasibility of market applications. Integration of innovative technologies and solutions that are efficient, resilient, and grid-interactive will play a pivotal role in supporting a clean energy future. However, it is imperative that decarbonization solutions, specifically in the built environment, prioritize far reaching benefits such as equitable outcomes, healthy environments by improving home and business quality, and overall cost and energy savings for communities. By embracing decarbonization, the construction industry can revolutionize itself, promoting sustainability, reducing carbon emissions, conserving resources, while enhancing performance and durability—all major steps toward a greener and more sustainable future.

PREREGISTRATION IS REQUIRED TO ATTEND. Tickets may be purchased at the ACI Registration Desk up to 24 hours prior to the event, based on availability. Please notify the ACI Registration Desk if you have any dietary restrictions.


1:00 PM - 2:00 PM

Moderator: Mrs Nubia Renhe

ACI 341 will be regularly hosting mini sessions at each convention aimed at providing an opportunity for graduate students and early career individuals to present their research. We are coordinating this effort with the other ACI seismic committees.

Learning Objectives:
(1) Learn about state-of-the-art research conducted at universities in the realm of seismic design;
(2) Provide an avenue for early career researchers to convey their work and get them excited about ACI committee activities;
(3) Provide an avenue for early career researchers to convey their work;
(4) Encourage young professionals to engage in ACI committee activities.


1:30 PM - 3:30 PM

Moderator: Dr Andrea J Schokker

This session will overview the current ACI initiatives around low-carbon concrete and sustainable concrete followed by a look forward into resilient concrete. The speakers will come together at the end for a panel discussion on what’s next for the concrete industry and discuss ACI’s potential role.

Learning Objectives:
(1) Describe what Codes from ACI committees are in progress related to sustainability;
(2) Describe the concepts of sustainability and resilience, in the context of the concrete industry;
(3) Identify ways the concrete industry can contribute to sustainability;
(4) Summarize the current status of the concrete industry in providing low carbon solutions.


1:30 PM - 3:30 PM

Moderators: Dr Jason Weiss, Joshua M Carroll

This session will review lessons learned from cement manufacturing, concrete producers, and concrete contractors and finishers. This session will discuss the field observations and growing pains being discovered. In addition to real-world observations, several scientific factors will be discussed. While not all answers are known, progress is being made and challenges tackled!

Learning Objectives:
(1) Describe what Type IL portland-limestone cement is and how it differs from a traditional cement;
(2) Describe how concrete made using portland-limestone cement is similar or different with respect to mixture proportioning;
(3) Discuss the role that PLC plays on the performance of SCMS in a mixture;
(4) Discuss considerations in specifying the use of Type IL portland-limestone cement based on current observations.


1:30 PM - 3:30 PM

Moderators: Mr Michael S Stenko , Peter Barlow

Michael Sprinkel, an ACI Fellow, passed away in December 2022. Michael was a pioneer and industry leader in the maintenance, repair, and rehabilitation of highway bridges. He foresaw the critical need for maintaining the existing public bridges in the late 1970’s, when the primary interest was building new structures. His leadership is projected through his work as a member and chairman of several American Concrete Institute (ACI) committees and as a member of its Technical Advisory Committee. His leadership work was recognized by ACI in conferring the Robert E. Philleo Award in 2012 and the Charles S. Whitney Medal in 2021. He also chaired concrete and polymer committees at TRB. Michael received the TRB's K.B. Woods Award for Best Paper in Design and Construction of Transportation Facilities in 1988.

A series of technical sessions are proposed to review Michael Sprinkel's contributions and to highlight current state of practice across his areas of expertise, including durable concrete mixture designs, post-tensioning grouts, bridge deck overlays, and other polymer treatments for concrete preservation.

Learning Objectives:
(1) Evaluate design and application of very early strength latex modified concrete overlays to efficiently rehabilitate bridge decks;
(2) Discuss the importance and effectiveness of preventive maintenance for in-service concrete structures;
(3) Assess quality control for prepackaged concrete repair materials;
(4) Report on appropriate design detailing for fiber reinforced polymer laminates.


1:30 PM - 3:30 PM

Moderators: Dr Pravin Saraswatula, Dr Sriramya D Nair

The purpose of this session is to offer authors/speakers an open forum for presentation of recent technical information that does not fit into other sessions scheduled for this convention. Any aspect of structural analysis or design, concrete materials science, or construction, manufacturing, use, and maintenance and health monitoring of concrete structures and products can be presented.

Learning Objectives:
(1) Elucidate the chemical composition and phase mineralogy of phases using Raman Imaging;
(2) Understand the influence of calcining low-grade clays, performance of belite calcium sulfoaluminate (BCSA) cements and the future of bio-concrete;
(3) Design provisions for hooked bar lap splices;
(4) Explore effects of loading history on behavior of concrete columns.


2:00 PM - 3:00 PM

Moderator: Dr Michael C Brown

Chloride-induced corrosion of embedded metallic reinforcement is a primary factor in deterioration of reinforced concrete buildings and civil infrastructure. Conventional methods for detecting chloride transport through concrete have relied on destructive physical sampling and wet chemistry (e.g., ASTM C1152, ASTM C128, or AASHTO T260). Such methods are reliable and repeatable but require careful handling and subsampling of concrete to obtain appropriate precision. Further, such methods necessarily have involved determining average or composite chloride concentrations from pulverized and material taken over finite sample increments, typically combining both the aggregate and paste fractions of the concrete sample.
This session will explore application of several elemental mapping techniques, how their results may compare or contrast with results of conventional testing, and whether such methods can be standardized to provide a reliable, repeatable, and more refined approach to measure distributions of chlorine and other elements of interest in hardened concrete.

Learning Objectives:
(1) Discuss how chloride and other elements of interest are measured in samples of hardened concrete and how the information is used to support condition assessment and service life analysis;
(2) Review existing or evolving elemental mapping techniques that can determine element concentrations at a fine scale using non-destructive or minimally destructive methods;
(3) Describe the physical phenomena that underlie each of the subject techniques, including laser ablation, x-ray and neutron radiation methods. The strengths and limitations of each method for concrete evaluation will be discussed;
(4) Explain how new elemental mapping techniques can be compared to the results of conventional wet chemistry methods and some of the challenges to standardization and utilizing the information in the context of historic practice and empirical knowledge.


2:00 PM - 3:00 PM

Moderator: Mr Fouad H Yazbeck

Explain how silica fume lends to heightened sustainable and resilient construction. Learn how silica fume lends to the overall lowered embodied carbon in structures. Topics will include extending service life through enhanced durability with silica fume, reducing member size in design when using silica fume concrete, increasing particle packing in concrete mixtures (SCC and HPC), and reducing water and cementitious material content when using silica fume in concrete pumping.

Learning Objectives:
(1) Discuss how silica fume concrete increases the durability of concrete structures, lowering the overall embodied energy through increased service life;
(2) Explain how including silica fume in concrete mixtures as an SCM can replace the concrete's portland cement content and lower the mixture's embodied energy;
(3) Describe how using silica fume in concrete structures can reduce specimen size, thus lowering the volume of concrete necessary and reducing the overall embodied energy of the structure;
(4) Summarize the basics of silica fume for those unfamiliar with the product.


3:00 PM - 4:00 PM

Moderators: Dr Anthony J Lamanna, KEILA D LOMBARDOZZI

This mini session is a recurring event focused on the latest developments, case studies, and lessons learned in concrete constructability. Arguably, constructability is one of the most overlooked components of concrete project design and planning. Yet, if not properly addressed, it can result in a variety of issues during the construction phase of the project, including negative impacts on the project schedule and budget. Often, the devil lies in the details when it comes to constructible projects. This session will aim at discussing a variety of constructability-related topics that will be based on real-world experience and case studies.

Learning Objectives:
(1) Recognize recent developments in the area of concrete constructability;
(2) Describe frequent issues occurring on concrete projects that negatively impact constructability, schedules and project budgets;
(3) Identify potential constructability pain points and acquire proven strategies to prevent them from occurring;
(4) Evaluate the design behind complicated project elements and alternative methods to construct them.


4:00 PM - 6:00 PM

Moderator: In Ho Cho

This session will cover recently emerging data- and machine learning (ML)-driven innovations of reinforced concrete (RC) structures. The use of data and ML for RC structure is not monolithic. This new approach can be applied to diverse length scales from the entire infrastructure, to individual structural elements, to millimeter crack-scale, and even to micro/nano-scale fundamental physics. Data play as a critical foundation and the prediction accuracies are subject to considerable uncertainty. Therefore, data quality issues and uncertainty quantifications of the data- and ML-driven approaches to RC structures must be addressed along with the predictions. This theme of the proposed session is aligned with the mission of ACI-ASCE 447 committee to benefit broad practicing engineers and researchers in the era of data, ML, and computing.

Learning Objectives:
(1) Report on recently emerging data science and machine learning (ML) methods for RC structures;
(2) Recognize how to select ML methods suitable for specific length scales and mechanisms of RC structures;
(3) Interpret and handle experimental and computational data from RC structures for ML;
(4) Discuss how to access uncertainties of the ML methods for RC structural analysis.


4:00 PM - 6:00 PM

Moderators: Dr Jason Weiss, Joshua M Carroll

This session will review lessons learned from cement manufacturing, concrete producers, and concrete contactors and finishers. This session will discuss the field observations and growing pains being discovered. In addition to real-world observations, several scientific factors will be discussed. While not all answers are known, progress is being made and challenges tackled!

Learning Objectives:
(1) Discuss what research has been completed, what is currently being performed and what is planned;
(2) Discuss producer experiences with PLC concrete;
(3) Describe how portland-limestone cement differs from a traditional cement with regards to finishing and curing;
(4) Assess what contractors and finishers are experiencing in the field as they incorporate Type IL portland-limestone cement in their markets.


4:00 PM - 6:00 PM

Moderators: Dr Pravin Saraswatula, Dr Sriramya D Nair

The purpose of this session is to offer authors/speakers an open forum for presentation of recent technical information that does not fit into other sessions scheduled for this convention. Any aspect of structural analysis or design, concrete materials science, or construction, manufacturing, use, and maintenance and health monitoring of concrete structures and products can be presented.

Learning Objectives:
(1) Explore the use of epoxy-coated reinforcing bars in UHPC;
(2) Learn about advanced 4D X-ray CT to analyze coal combustion ashes.
(3) Gain insights into the use of nano materials for accelerating CO2 uptake and strengthening ITZ;
(4) Be introduced to 3D concrete printing and enhancing thermal efficiency using phase change materials.


5:00 PM - 6:00 PM

Faculty members and graduate students are invited to attend this informal reception for an opportunity to exchange ideas and network. Light hors d'oeuvres and a cash bar will be available.


6:30 PM - 8:00 PM

Join ACI attendees and guests for an evening of networking, entertainment, and great food during the Concrete Mixer, held at the Hyatt Regency New Orleans. An assortment of food and beverages will be available.



Upper Level Sponsors

Baker
Conseal
Euclid Chemical
FullForce Solutions
Master Builders
Natural Resources Research Institute - University of Minnesota
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