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International Concrete Abstracts Portal

Showing 1-5 of 23 Abstracts search results

Document: 

SP157-01

Date: 

October 1, 1995

Author(s):

R. Park

Publication:

Symposium Papers

Volume:

157

Abstract:

Gives an outline of the many significant and pioneering contributions made by Emeritus Professor Tom Paulay to the understanding of the behavior of reinforced concrete and to the design of reinforced concrete structures for earthquake resistance. Particularly innovative has been his research into the design of structural walls for earthquake resistance, including the concept of the use of diagonal reinforcement in coupling beams. Other internationally recognized research described include his outstanding investigations into the mechanisms of shear resistance of reinforced concrete, aggregate interlock across cracks, behavior of beam-column joints, and the capacity design and detailing procedures for structural walls and frames.

DOI:

10.14359/1042


Document: 

SP157-10

Date: 

October 1, 1995

Author(s):

A. J. O'Leary

Publication:

Symposium Papers

Volume:

157

Abstract:

Describes design and construction aspects of precast concrete moment resisting frames for the lateral load resistance of multistory buildings. Discussion will concentrate on the particular aspects of the framing system of a 13-story building constructed in Wellington, New Zealand. The building is octagonal in plan with a perimeter lateral load-resisting frame consisting of two-story high precast reinforced concrete elements. Each element includes a column plus two levels of beam stubs. In-situ concrete midspan beam splices and grouted steel sleeve column reinforcing bar splices form the joints between individual units. The paper also briefly presents other similar precast systems used for multistory buildings. A review of laboratory testing recently completed is given which confirms the good structural performance of the framing systems described.

DOI:

10.14359/1016


Document: 

SP157-09

Date: 

October 1, 1995

Author(s):

P. E. Pinto and G. M. Calvi

Publication:

Symposium Papers

Volume:

157

Abstract:

Reviews the aspects considered to be major limitations, from a conceptual point of view if not always from a practical one, in the view of a codified approach to design and, more generally, in the ability to describe seismic response of structures. The state of progress and current research efforts on three interrelated subjects are first discussed, including capacity design criteria and procedures, definition of the state of collapse and damage of a structure, and viable techniques for a probabilistic calibration of safety factors. It should be noted that a fuller rationalization of these aspects is more acutely needed in Europe due to the larger variety of structural typologies, which calls for more refined differentiations and, in turn, for more rational and visible justifications In the second part of the paper, the specific problem of shear-bending interaction is considered; this behavior is qualitatively known, but is neither quantitatively well defined nor commonly implemented in computer programs. A simple proposal for an analytical model is presented and discussed. The results of some preliminary numerical simulations show interesting results, their main merit consisting in an indication of the relevance of the problems. Similar elements could be easily integrated into nonlinear dynamic programs and used for probabilistic calibrations. The paper is concluded by a brief presentation of a broad experimental and analytical research program just started in Europe to support the final preparation of a unified seismic code.

DOI:

10.14359/1005


Document: 

SP157-04

Date: 

October 1, 1995

Author(s):

D. Mitchell

Publication:

Symposium Papers

Volume:

157

Abstract:

Discusses aspects of the design of connections in reinforced concrete frame structures which often get overlooked. The need for careful assessment and detailing of slab-column connections in flat plate structures combined with walls is addressed. The way in which the strength and stiffness of spandrel beams can significantly alter the expected response of beam-column connections is illustrated by experimental results and observed seismic damage. Detailed analysis of beam-column joint regions using the modified compression field theory demonstrates behavioral features that have important design implications. The use of nonlinear finite element modelling of joint regions to design efficient, yet practical, retrofit measures is discussed. An alternate form of construction using ductile steel link beams to connect reinforced concrete walls is presented. The important design features for the connection of these beams to the walls are highlighted.

DOI:

10.14359/1002


Document: 

SP157-17

Date: 

October 1, 1995

Author(s):

M. Tomll

Publication:

Symposium Papers

Volume:

157

Abstract:

The method of transversely reinforcing columns and beam-to-column connections with bellows square steel tubes was devised to develop a construction method necessary to realize reinforced concrete frame highrise buildings which are easy to design and execute in zones where high earthquake resisting performance is required. To secure a ductile seismic behavior for columns subjected to heavy load, strong shear reinforcement and transverse reinforcement are necessary to prevent brittle failure, such as shear failure, bond split failure along the longitudinal bars, and failure of the compressed extreme fiber of concrete, or to change it into ductile failure. It was manifested by concentric compression tests of 1/4 scale columns, combined compression, bending and shear tests of 1/3 scale columns, seismic load tests of 1/3 scale and 1/4 scale beam-column subassemblages, and bond tests of main bars embedded in 1/4 scale columns that no dangerous collapse of the building is likely to occur even if shear forces of some of the columns and/or beam-to-column connections in the same story reach the loading capacity, because the mechanical behavior of the columns and beam-to-column connections is very ductile even when the webs of their tube yield in shear. Field execution tests of this structure have been conducted.

DOI:

10.14359/985


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