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International Concrete Abstracts Portal

Showing 1-5 of 23 Abstracts search results

Document: 

SP157-06

Date: 

October 1, 1995

Author(s):

H. Bachmann and P. Linde

Publication:

Symposium Papers

Volume:

157

Abstract:

Reinforced concrete structural walls may provide efficient earthquake resistance in multistory buildings. In Europe, they are commonly combined with gravity load dominated slender columns in which the entire horizontal action is taken by the walls. In recent years, it became possible to design reinforced concrete structural walls in a clear manner according to the capacity design method which is based on an "elastic" equivalent static force reduced by a global displacement ductility factor and by an overstrength reduction factor. In this paper, a nonlinear dynamic performance check of capacity designed walls was carried out. For this purpose, a newly developed macro model was used for the modelling of the wall. Nonlinear time history analyses were carried out with a ground motion compatible to the elastic design response spectrum of the Swiss Standard SIA 160 as input. The major findings of this paper pertain to three important design aspects as follows. 1. The dynamic rotational ductility demand may have a different distribution over various height to length aspect ratios of the wall than previously anticipated by static analysis. 2. The dynamic bending moment demand over the height of the wall may differ from the static assumption depending on the aspect ratio of the wall. This necessitates a modified moment capacity distribution. 3. The dynamic shear force at the base of the wall may exceed the previous assumptions of the capacity design method.

DOI:

10.14359/1003


Document: 

SP157-01

Date: 

October 1, 1995

Author(s):

R. Park

Publication:

Symposium Papers

Volume:

157

Abstract:

Gives an outline of the many significant and pioneering contributions made by Emeritus Professor Tom Paulay to the understanding of the behavior of reinforced concrete and to the design of reinforced concrete structures for earthquake resistance. Particularly innovative has been his research into the design of structural walls for earthquake resistance, including the concept of the use of diagonal reinforcement in coupling beams. Other internationally recognized research described include his outstanding investigations into the mechanisms of shear resistance of reinforced concrete, aggregate interlock across cracks, behavior of beam-column joints, and the capacity design and detailing procedures for structural walls and frames.

DOI:

10.14359/1042


Document: 

SP157-04

Date: 

October 1, 1995

Author(s):

D. Mitchell

Publication:

Symposium Papers

Volume:

157

Abstract:

Discusses aspects of the design of connections in reinforced concrete frame structures which often get overlooked. The need for careful assessment and detailing of slab-column connections in flat plate structures combined with walls is addressed. The way in which the strength and stiffness of spandrel beams can significantly alter the expected response of beam-column connections is illustrated by experimental results and observed seismic damage. Detailed analysis of beam-column joint regions using the modified compression field theory demonstrates behavioral features that have important design implications. The use of nonlinear finite element modelling of joint regions to design efficient, yet practical, retrofit measures is discussed. An alternate form of construction using ductile steel link beams to connect reinforced concrete walls is presented. The important design features for the connection of these beams to the walls are highlighted.

DOI:

10.14359/1002


Document: 

SP157-17

Date: 

October 1, 1995

Author(s):

M. Tomll

Publication:

Symposium Papers

Volume:

157

Abstract:

The method of transversely reinforcing columns and beam-to-column connections with bellows square steel tubes was devised to develop a construction method necessary to realize reinforced concrete frame highrise buildings which are easy to design and execute in zones where high earthquake resisting performance is required. To secure a ductile seismic behavior for columns subjected to heavy load, strong shear reinforcement and transverse reinforcement are necessary to prevent brittle failure, such as shear failure, bond split failure along the longitudinal bars, and failure of the compressed extreme fiber of concrete, or to change it into ductile failure. It was manifested by concentric compression tests of 1/4 scale columns, combined compression, bending and shear tests of 1/3 scale columns, seismic load tests of 1/3 scale and 1/4 scale beam-column subassemblages, and bond tests of main bars embedded in 1/4 scale columns that no dangerous collapse of the building is likely to occur even if shear forces of some of the columns and/or beam-to-column connections in the same story reach the loading capacity, because the mechanical behavior of the columns and beam-to-column connections is very ductile even when the webs of their tube yield in shear. Field execution tests of this structure have been conducted.

DOI:

10.14359/985


Document: 

SP157-14

Date: 

October 1, 1995

Author(s):

S. M. Uzumeri

Publication:

Symposium Papers

Volume:

157

Abstract:

Summarizes the developments and changes to the seismic design provisions of the National Building Code of Canada (NBCC 1990) since its 1977 edition and discusses the changes to the seismic design provisions of the Canadian Standards Association Standard, Design of Concrete Structures for Buildings (CAN3-A23.3). The paper outlines the philosophy of seismic-resistant design of the Canadian code and discusses the changes to the zoning maps, static design procedures, and the introduction of the force modification factors. The paper also deals with the changes to the Canadian reinforced concrete code and especially with the section on ductile walls, changes to load combination factors, and the explicit links between the concrete code sections containing the detailing requirements and the NBCC sections on determination of the design seismic forces.

DOI:

10.14359/1008


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