440.1R-15 Guide for the Design and Construction of Structural Concrete Reinforced with Fiber-Reinforced Polymer Bars

440.1R-15 Guide for the Design and Construction of Structural Concrete Reinforced with Fiber-Reinforced Polymer Bars

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Description

Fiber-reinforced polymer (FRP) materials have emerged as an alternative for producing reinforcing bars for concrete structures. Fiber-reinforced polymer reinforcing bars offer advantages over steel reinforcement because they are noncorrosive. Some FRP bars are nonconductive as well. Due to other differences in the physical and mechanical behavior of FRP materials versus steel, unique guidance on the engineering and construction of concrete structures reinforced with FRP bars is necessary. Other countries and regions, such as Japan, Canada, and Europe have established design and construction guidelines specifically for the use of FRP bars as concrete reinforcement. This guide offers general information on the history and use of FRP reinforcement, a description of the unique material properties of FRP, and guidelines for the design and construction of structural concrete members reinforced with FRP bars. This guide is based on the knowledge gained from worldwide experimental research, analytical work, and field applications of FRP reinforcement.

Keywords: anchorage (structural); aramid fiber; carbon fiber; crack control; concrete construction; concrete slabs; cover; creep rupture; deflections; design examples; durability; fiber-reinforced polymer; flexural strength; glass fiber; moments; reinforced concrete; reinforcement; serviceability; shear strength; spans; strength analysis; stresses; structural concrete; structural design.

Document Details

Author: ACI Committee 440

Publication Year: 2015

Pages: 88

ISBN: 9781942727101

Categories: Fiber-Reinforced Polymers(FRP)

Formats: Printed Document, PDF, ePub, or Kindle

Table of Contents

CHAPTER 1—INTRODUCTION AND SCOPE

1.1—Introduction

1.2—Scope

CHAPTER 2—NOTATION AND DEFINITIONS

2.1—Notation

2.2—Definitions

CHAPTER 3—BACKGROUND

3.1—Historical development

3.2—History of use

3.3—Material characteristics

CHAPTER 4—MATERIAL CHARACTERISTICS

4.1—Physical properties

4.2—Mechanical properties and behavior

4.3—Time-dependent behavior

4.4—Effects of high temperatures and fire

CHAPTER 5—DURABILITY

5.1—Accelerated durability testing

5.2—Durability of FRP bars

5.3—Durability of bond between FRP and concrete

CHAPTER 6—GENERAL DESIGN CONSIDERATIONS

6.1—Design philosophy

6.2—Design material properties

CHAPTER 7—FLEXURE

7.1—General considerations

7.2—Flexural strength

7.3—Serviceability

7.4—Creep rupture and fatigue

CHAPTER 8—SHEAR

8.1—General considerations

8.2—Shear strength of FRP-reinforced members

8.3—Detailing of shear stirrups

8.4—Shear strength of FRP-reinforced two-way concrete

slabs

CHAPTER 9—SHRINKAGE AND TEMPERATURE

REINFORCEMENT

9.1—Minimum FRP reinforcement ratio

CHAPTER 10—DEVELOPMENT AND SPLICES OF

REINFORCEMENT

10.1—Development of stress in straight bar

10.2—Development length of bent bar

10.3—Development of positive moment reinforcement

10.4—Tension lap splice

CHAPTER 11—DESIGN EXAMPLES

Example 1—Flexural (moment) strength using equivalent

rectangular concrete stress distribution (compressioncontrolled

section)

Example 2—Flexural (moment) strength using equivalent

rectangular concrete stress distribution (tension-controlled

section)

Example 3—Design of a rectangular beam with tension

reinforcement only

Example 4—Design of one-way solid slab

Example 5—Distribution of reinforcement for effective

crack control

Example 6—Deflection of a simple-span nonprestressed

rectangular beam

Example 7—Creep rupture stress check under sustained

loads

Example 8—Design for shear (members subject to shear

and flexure only)

Example 9—Development of bars in tension (compression-

controlled or transition zone section)

Example 10—Development of bars in tension (tensioncontrolled

section)

Example 11—Shear strength of slab at column support

Example 1M—Flexural (moment) strength using equivalent

rectangular concrete stress distribution (compressioncontrolled

section)

Example 2M—Flexural (moment) strength using equivalent

rectangular concrete stress distribution (tensioncontrolled

section)

Example 3M—Design of a rectangular beam with tension

reinforcement only

Example 4M—Design of one-way solid slab

Example 5M—Distribution of reinforcement for effective

crack control

Example 6M—Deflection of a simple-span nonprestressed

rectangular beam

Example 7M—Creep rupture stress check under sustained

loads

Example 8M—Design for shear (members subject to

shear and flexure only)

Example 9M—Development of bars in tension (compression-

controlled or transition zone section)

Example 10M—Development of bars in tension (tensioncontrolled

section)

Example 11M—Shear strength of slab at column support

CHAPTER 12—REFERENCES

Authored documents

APPENDIX A—SLABS-ON-GROUND

A.1—Design of plain concrete slabs

A.2—Design of slabs with shrinkage and temperature

reinforcement

ERRATA INFO

Any applicable errata are included with individual documents at the time of purchase. Errata are not included for collections or sets of documents such as the Manual of Concrete Practice (MCP). For a listing of and access to all product errata, visit the Errata page.

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