Possibilities of Assessing the Temperatures Reached by Concrete Building Elements During a Fire

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Title: Possibilities of Assessing the Temperatures Reached by Concrete Building Elements During a Fire

Author(s): L. Krampf and A. Haksever

Publication: Special Publication

Volume: 92

Issue:

Appears on pages(s): 115-142

Keywords: buildings; concretes; construction materials; damage; deformation; estimates; evaluation; fires; fire tests; high temper-ature; temperature; thermal properties

Date: 6/1/1986

Abstract:
The present paper is intended to give an overall information on temperatures which may have occured in concrete cross-sections affected by a fire Firstly the paper contains a catalogue of circumstances and vestiges which can be found when the affected building is visited and which allow conclusions concerning the intensity of the fire and the resulting value of damages to the structural elements. For this purpose, residual contents of the building (fire load), the state of building materials, and the evident condition of the concrete structure itself are used. In the second part of the paper, general informations are given on the development of natural fires and on the parameters which in-fluence it. On the basis of two series of experiments - Metz and Lehrte - which gave temperature-time developments in compartments where wood cribs or furniture were burnt, temperature fields are presented for square concrete cross-sections affected from all sides, and for T-shaped sections affected from three sides. It is stated that the presented figures can only be rough approaches for practical work. Short, only introductory informations on residual changes of material properties due to temperature influences are added to facili-tate judgements and decisions. It stands to reason that, if findings won by this guide lead to the conclusion that the structure may be worthy to be kept, more intense and detailed investigations have to be done.