Precision Grouting - Theory and Practice

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Title: Precision Grouting - Theory and Practice

Author(s): John C. King

Publication: Special Publication

Volume: 78

Issue:

Appears on pages(s): 253-270

Keywords: columns (supports); epoxy resins; fine aggregates; foundations; grout; grouting; hydraulic cements; machine bases; shrinkage; tests.

Date: 1/1/1982

Abstract:
Grout, shims, or both, plus anchors form the vital link between machines, equipment, and column bases and their foundations. Grout and/or shims hold the equipment up and anchors hold it down. Grout, as used in this paper, is any fluid, flowable, plastic, or packable material that can be used to fill the space between the underside of a machine or column and the foundation on which the unit is to rest, then harden there to support the unit. The most widely used materials for grouts are combinations of hydraulic cements, fine aggregates including graded iron particles, various additives including chemical admixtures, and water. In recent years, various epoxy combinations with and without suspended fine aggregate have also been employed. This paper discusses hydraulic cement base grouts that are intended to not only completely fill the space under a base plate initially, but also harden in tight contact with the plate and permanently support or participate in the support of that plate. Such grouts are generally referred to as "nonshrink." Reasonably obtainable properties that the engineer may require of such a grout and tests he may specify to assure the results he desires are described. The pluses and minuses of fluid, flowable, plastic, and dry-pack grouts are covered and techniques for placing grouts at each consistency are described and illustrated. A measurable definition of the terms fluid, flowable, plastic, and dry-pack is offered.