Self-Consolidating Concrete at Padgett-Thomas Barracks—The Citadel

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Title: Self-Consolidating Concrete at Padgett-Thomas Barracks—The Citadel

Author(s): G. Amekuedi, R. Morrow, M. Nigels, and B. Guedel

Publication: Special Publication

Volume: 222

Issue:

Appears on pages(s): 33-50

Keywords: compressive strength; flexural strength; self-consolidating concrete; shrinkage

Date: 5/1/2004

Abstract:
The Citadel in Charleston, South Carolina is steeped in tradition down to the buildings at the campus. Currently under construction is a replacement for the Padgett-Thomas Barracks, which was demolished in 2001. The new structure will be identical to the original barracks. It will showcase a classic fortress design that requires intricate forming and careful planning in the proportioning and placement of the concrete mixtures, in order to minimize/eliminate cost over-runs that have been experienced in previous construction projects at the campus. Through a cooperative effort involving all parties in the construction of the new barracks, self-consolidating concrete (SCC) is now being used in lieu of the originally specified regular slump concrete. The use of SCC in the construction of the narrow 150mm (6 in.) thick walls have significantly increased placement/construction efficiency. It has also resulted in a greatly enhanced surface finish and sharper edges. This paper chronicles the project from the pre-construction meetings and trial placements to the placement efficiencies that have been realized due to the use of SCC. About 7646 cubic meters (10,000 cubic yards) of SCC are going to be used for this project, which is scheduled for completion in 2004. Data on the properties of the SCC mixture from the field and companion laboratory studies are presented and discussed.