HSC Designed by Three Mixture Proportioning Methods: How Much Different Are They?

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Title: HSC Designed by Three Mixture Proportioning Methods: How Much Different Are They?

Author(s): N.G. Maldonado and P.R.L. Helene

Publication: Special Publication

Volume: 207

Issue:

Appears on pages(s): 311-326

Keywords: concrete; high strength concretes; mechanical properties; mixture proportioning; mixture proportioning methods

Date: 10/7/2002

Abstract:
Three well known mixture proportioning methods were used in this research ACI 211 Method, Argentina Portland Cement Institute ICPA Method and University of Sao Paulo USP Method. The mixture proportioning concepts, procedures and steps of each method are different but the target is the same - to achieve the best and the cheapest high strength concrete. This research was carried out using materials available in high seismic risk regions, near the Andes Mountain in the West of Argentina, where there is predominant rounded gravel from basaltic and granite rock, and rounded natural quartz sand. The advantages of the high strength concretes compel a solution between structural design, laboratory tests and field jobs, where mixture proportioning method have an important rule. All mixture proportioning method can help to achieve the best concrete but also must be economic, rapid, easy and allow secure changes in field without new laboratory tests. The evaluation criteria considered workability, cement content, compressive strength, tensile splitting test, modulus of elasticity and specific cost evaluation to distinguish between the different mixture proportioning methods so as to achieve the same final concrete properties. The USP Method was showed to be a useful method in laboratory procedures and more flexible when some field changes are necessary.