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International Concrete Abstracts Portal

Showing 1-5 of 99 Abstracts search results

Document: 

SP-336_01

Date: 

December 11, 2019

Author(s):

James Lafikes, Rouzbeh Khajehdehi, Muzai Feng, Matthew O’Reilly, David Darwin

Publication:

Symposium Papers

Volume:

336

Abstract:

Supplementary cementitious materials (SCMs) in conjunction with pre-wetted fine lightweight aggregate to provide internal curing are being increasingly used to produce high performance, low-shrinking concrete to mitigate bridge deck cracking, providing more sustainable projects with a longer service life. Additionally, the SCMs aid in concrete sustainability by reducing the amount of cement needed in these projects. This study examines the density of cracks in bridge decks in Indiana and Utah that incorporated internal curing with various combinations of portland cement and SCMs, specifically, slag cement, Class C and Class F fly ash, and silica fume, in concrete mixtures with water-cementitious material ratios ranging from 0.39 to 0.44. When compared with crack densities in low-cracking high-performance concrete (LC-HPC) and control bridge decks in Kansas, concrete mixtures with a paste content higher than 27% exhibited more cracking, regardless of the use of internal curing or SCMs. Bridge decks with paste contents below 26% that incorporate internal curing and SCMs exhibited low cracking at early ages, although additional surveys will be needed before conclusions on long term behavior can be made.


Document: 

SP334

Date: 

October 9, 2019

Author(s):

Moncef L. Nehdi

Publication:

Symposium Papers

Volume:

334

Abstract:

To improve the eco-efficiency and sustainability of concrete, the cement and concrete industry can exploit many byproducts in applications that could, in some cases, outperform conventional materials made with traditional ingredients. This Special Publication of the American Concrete Institute Committee 555 (Concrete with Recycled Materials) is a contribution towards improving the sustainability of concrete via using recycled materials, such as scrap tire rubber and tire steel wire fiber, GFRP waste, fluff, reclaimed asphalt pavements, recycled latex paint, and recycled concrete aggregate. Advancing knowledge in this area should introduce the use of recycled materials in concrete for applications never considered before, while achieving desirable performance criteria economically, without compromising the quality and long-term performance of the concrete civil infrastructure.


Document: 

SP-334-10

Date: 

September 30, 2019

Author(s):

Ahmed A. Gheni and Mohamed A. ElGawady

Publication:

Symposium Papers

Volume:

334

Abstract:

Statistics show an increase in the use of fly ash in concrete to improve both sustainability and performance. However, concrete incorporating high volume fly ash has encountered an issue with incompatibility between fly ash and air entraining admixture (AEA). This study investigates using ground recycled rubber (GRR) as an eco-friendly alternative to AEA to improve the freeze-thaw performance of mortar mixtures incorporating two different types and ratios of fly ash. Two different sizes and ratios of GRR were used in this study. The results were compared with mixtures having two different types and dosages of AEA as well as a reference mortar mixture having neither GRR nor AEA. Foam indices were determined for both types of fly ash and compared with cement. The compressive strength retention values of mortar cubes after exposing them to 36 freeze-thaw cycles were determined and linked to the air content of each mixture. This study revealed that the GRR outperformed the AEA in terms of the freeze-thaw durability where all mixtures retained their compressive strengths. However, the performance of mixtures including AEA was inconsistent depending on the chemical composition of the fly ash, fly ash replacement ratio, and AEA dosage.


Document: 

SP331

Date: 

March 1, 2019

Author(s):

ACI Committee 345, ACI Committee 201, Yail J. Kim, Isamu Yoshitake, and Mark F. Green

Publication:

Symposium Papers

Volume:

331

Abstract:

Sustainability is one of the salient requirements in modern society. Structures frequently deteriorate because of aggressive service environments; consequently, federal and state agencies expend significant endeavors to maintain the quality of the structures. Among many factors, durability plays a major role in accomplishing the concept of sustainability. Extensive research has been conducted to understand the deterioration mechanisms of concrete and to extend the longevity of concrete members. Over the past decades, the advancement of technologies has resulted in durable construction materials such as advanced composites. This Special Publication (SP) contains nine papers selected from two technical sessions held in the ACI Spring Convention at Detroit, MI, in March 2017. All manuscripts were reviewed by at least two experts in accordance with the ACI publication policy.


Document: 

SP336

Date: 

January 12, 2019

Author(s):

Ralf Leistikow and Kimberly Waggle Kramer

Publication:

Symposium Papers

Volume:

336

Abstract:

ACI Committees 130 and 224 sponsored and moderated two sessions at The ACI Concrete Convention and Exposition – Fall 2017, held in Anaheim, California. The objective of the sessions was to review the use of innovative mixture designs which incorporated sustainable admixtures and supplemental cementitious materials, and the effect these sustainable technologies have on the cracking performance and durability of these concretes. In particular, cracking behavior in sustainable concretes or practices for mitigation of cracking in sustainable concretes was reviewed. This information was shared based on completed research and case studies of sustainable concrete mixture designs. The learning objectives of the two sessions follow: 1) Learn about innovative mixture designs that incorporate sustainable admixtures and supplemental cementitious materials; 2) Learn about the effect these sustainable technologies have on the cracking performance and durability of these concrete mixes; 3) Gain an understanding of the cracking behavior of sustainable concrete mixtures; and 4) Learn about practices used to mitigate cracking in sustainable concrete. Twelve presentations were given, and the presenters came from all over the world. Following the sessions, some of the presenters authored papers that provided more extensive information about their research. This SP include copies of these seven research papers.


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