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  • The International Concrete Abstracts Portal is an ACI led collaboration with leading technical organizations from within the international concrete industry and offers the most comprehensive collection of published concrete abstracts.

International Concrete Abstracts Portal

Showing 1-5 of 58 Abstracts search results

Document: 

22-379

Date: 

March 15, 2024

Author(s):

Joseph Jean Assaad and Marianne Saba

Publication:

Materials Journal

Abstract:

This paper assesses the suitability of geopolymers (GPs) for use as adhesives for ceramic tile fixing, including their compliance to relevant EN 12004 specifications. Two series prepared with different percentages of metakaolin (MK), blast furnace slag (BFS), and limestone materials activated by an alkaline NaOH/Na2SiO3 solution are investigated. Tested properties included the thixotropy, setting, compressive strength, open time, and adhesion bond strength under different exposure conditions (i.e., dry, wet, heat, or freeze/thaw cycles). Compared to cement-based mortars containing adjusted proportions of cellulose and redispersible polymers, the GPs exhibited higher thixotropy reflecting additional energy for spreading the material over the substrate, yet better maintaining of the alternating patterns of ripples and grooves at rest. The bond strengths tested under different exposure conditions were remarkably high for the MK-based GP, given the fine MK particle sizes that foster geopolymerization and cross-linking of solid bonds in the hardened structure. The BFS-based GP exhibited relatively lower bond strengths (compared to MK) due to coarser particles. Such results can be of interest to civil engineers and manufacturers of ready-to-use building materials that aim at reducing the Portland cement footprint while assuring the performance and sustainability of tiling applications.

DOI:

10.14359/51740702


Document: 

22-124

Date: 

September 1, 2023

Author(s):

Arindam Dey, Tara L. Cavalline, Miras Mamirov, and Jiong Hu

Publication:

Materials Journal

Volume:

120

Issue:

5

Abstract:

The use of recycled concrete aggregates (RCAs) in lieu of natural aggregates improves the sustainability of the built environment. Barriers to the use of RCA include its variable composition, including the residual mortar content (RMC), chemical composition, and its potential to contain contaminants, which can negatively affect the properties of concrete or present environmental concerns. In this study, a rapid, economical method to estimate the RMC and provide the chemical characterization of RCA was developed using a portable handheld X-ray fluorescence (PHXRF) device. Models were developed using reference tests (RMC test based on the thermal shock method and chemical composition from whole-rock analysis) to correlate PHXRF results to measured values. The PHXRF shows strong potential for estimating the RMC and chemical composition of RCA. Paired with locally calibrated reference samples, the test method could be used in laboratory or field applications to characterize RCA and increase its use in bound and unbound applications.

DOI:

10.14359/51738890


Document: 

22-319

Date: 

July 1, 2023

Author(s):

Fayez Moutassem and Samir E. Chidiac

Publication:

Materials Journal

Volume:

120

Issue:

4

Abstract:

A requirement for achieving sustainable concrete structures is to develop a quantitative method for designing concrete mixtures that yields the target rheological properties and compressive strength. Toward this objective, this paper proposes a mathematical model approach to improve the sustainability of the concrete industry. A postulation that packing density, a function of the concrete mixture, provides the link between concrete mixture, rheological properties, and compressive strength was investigated. Rheological models for yield stress and plastic viscosity, and a compressive strength model were adopted with packing density as a central variable. The rheological models employ a cell description that is representative of fresh concrete. The compressive strength model is based on excess paste theory to account for the concrete mixture proportions, gradation of aggregate particles, and porosity. An experimental program was developed to calibrate and test these models. Results revealed that packing density provides a consistent and reliable link, and that the concrete mixture composition can be designed to achieve the target rheological properties and hardened properties and ensure quality control. Consequently, a new mixture proportioning methodology was developed and proposed as an improvement to the ACI 211.1 mixture design method. Furthermore, a case study was conducted to test for the applicability and adequacy of this proposed method. This research outcome, which provides a quantitative approach to design concrete mixtures to meet specific strength requirements and rheology, can also be used to ensure quality control before concrete is cast.

DOI:

10.14359/51738818


Document: 

21-461

Date: 

January 1, 2023

Author(s):

Francesca Lolli, Renee T. Rios, Katelynn Schoenrock, Emily Grubert, and Kimberly E. Kurtis

Publication:

Materials Journal

Volume:

120

Issue:

1

Abstract:

The use of performance-based specifications (PBS) may increase quality and sustainability while lowering project costs through innovations in concrete materials selection and proportioning. A preliminary survey was conducted showing that barriers to implementation for PBS still exist, the main barrier being the enforcement of the specification, followed by cost and time. This study aims to develop guidelines to overcome the identified barriers by presenting a laboratory-scale case study of six concrete mixtures that both conform (one) and do not conform (five) to Georgia Department of Transportation specifications. This case study includes experimental results of mechanical (flexural and compressive strength) and resistivity performance properties, as well as three additional parameters: time, cost, and carbon dioxide (CO2) emissions associated with each mixture design. This study showed that innovation in material use and mixture design can increase durability and performance while reducing the overall project cost and environmental impact.

DOI:

10.14359/51738457


Document: 

21-466

Date: 

January 1, 2023

Author(s):

Xiaoguang Chen, Zeger Sierens, Elke Gruyaert, and Jiabin Li

Publication:

Materials Journal

Volume:

120

Issue:

1

Abstract:

Mixed recycled aggregate (MRA) is considered a sustainable construction material, and its use in precast concrete is currently banned due to its poor engineering performance. This paper aims to evaluate the feasibility of partial replacement of natural coarse aggregate with MRA in self-consolidating concrete (SCC) for manufacturing architectural precast concrete sandwich wall panels. To this end, five MRAs from recycling plants were characterized, out of which two were selected to develop SCC. SCC mixtures with three replacement levels and three water compensation degrees were produced, and their physical, mechanical, durability, and aesthetic properties were examined. The results showed that the incorporation of MRA dominated the mechanical properties of SCC, while the water compensation degree primarily affected the flowability and carbonation resistance. The presence of MRA had no considerable effect on the aesthetic characteristics. Up to 10% MRA in weight of total aggregates could be used in precast SCC.

DOI:

10.14359/51737333


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