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International Concrete Abstracts Portal

Showing 1-5 of 129 Abstracts search results

Document: 

20-210

Date: 

July 1, 2021

Author(s):

Tayseer Z. Batran, Mohamed K. Ismail, and Assem A. A. Hassan

Publication:

Materials Journal

Volume:

118

Issue:

4

Abstract:

This study investigated the structural behavior of lightweight self-consolidating concrete (LWSCC) beams strengthened with engineered cementitious composite (ECC). Four LWSCC beams were strengthened at either the compression or tension zone using two types of ECC developed with polyvinyl alcohol (PVA) fibers or steel fibers (SFs). Three beams were also cast in full depth with LWSCC, ECC with PVA, and ECC with SFs, for comparison. The performance of all tested beams was evaluated based on loaddeflection response, cracking behavior, failure mode, first crack load, ultimate load, ductility, and energy absorption capacity. The flexural ultimate capacity of the tested beams was also estimated theoretically and compared to the experimental results. The results indicated that adding the ECC layer at the compression zone of the beam helped the LWSCC beams to sustain a higher ultimate loading, accompanied with obvious increases in the ductility and energy absorption capacity. Higher increases in the flexural capacity were exhibited by the beams strengthened with the ECC layer at the tension zone. Placing the ECC layer at the tension zone also contributed to controlling the formation of cracks, ensuring better durability for structural members. Using ECC with SFs yielded higher flexural capacity in beams compared to using ECC with PVA fibers. The study also indicated that the flexural capacity of single-layer and/or hybrid composite beams was conservatively estimated by the ACI ultimate strength design method and the Henager and Doherty model. More improvements in the Henager and Doherty model’s estimates were observed when the tensile stress of fibrous concrete was obtained experimentally.

DOI:

10.14359/51732635


Document: 

19-406

Date: 

March 1, 2021

Author(s):

Anvit Gadkar and Kolluru V. L. Subramaniam

Publication:

Materials Journal

Volume:

118

Issue:

2

Abstract:

Self-leveling concrete is developed with low-calcium alkali-activated fly ash (AAF) binder paste. The rheological behavior of AAF pastes with different compositions is evaluated. AAF pastes are proportioned with alkali-silicate activating solutions to ensure specific reactive oxide ratios for comparable geopolymer strength. The yield stress and the viscosity of the AAF binder paste vary with the silica content and the silica modulus (SiO2/Na2O mass ratio) in the alkali-silicate activating solution. The slump and flow behaviors of concrete mixtures made with AAF paste are evaluated. The requirements of the AAF binder characteristics, paste content, and aggregate packing for achieving self-leveling flow characteristics under gravity-induced flow are assessed. The transition from a frictional to a flow-type behavior in concrete mixtures depends on the AAF binder paste content. Self-leveling is achieved without the use of admixtures with an AAF binder paste of low yield stress and at a paste content of 45%. Improving the aggregate packing using the Fuller-Thompson curve and reducing the yield stress of the AAF binder paste increase the flow achieved in concrete mixtures. The specifications for cement-based self-consolidating concrete (SCC) are closely applicable for self-leveling AAF-based concrete.

DOI:

10.14359/51729324


Document: 

19-455

Date: 

March 1, 2021

Author(s):

Mohamed M. Sadek and Assem A. A. Hassan

Publication:

Materials Journal

Volume:

118

Issue:

2

Abstract:

This study evaluated the abrasion resistance for a number of lightweight self-consolidating concrete (LWSCC) incorporating coarse and fine lightweight expanded slate aggregates (LC or LF, respectively). The study also investigated the abrasion resistance before and after exposure to freezing-and-thawing cycles in the presence of deicing salt. The investigated parameters included different volumes of LC and LF aggregates, three binder contents (500, 550, and 600 kg/m3 [31.2, 34.3, and 37.5 lb/ft3]), and different types of concrete (LWSCC, lightweight vibrated concrete, and normal-weight self-consolidating concrete). Increasing the percentage of expanded slate aggregate decreased the abrasion resistance. Mixtures with LF showed higher strength-per-weight ratio and higher abrasion and salt-scaling resistance compared to mixtures with LC. Samples exposed to abrasion before salt scaling had higher mass losses due to salt scaling with an average of 26.8% compared to non-abraded ones. Higher mass loss was also observed in mixtures exposed to abrasion after the exposure to salt scaling with an average of 26% and 43.3% in the rotating-cutter and sandblasting abrasion tests, respectively.

DOI:

10.14359/51729325


Document: 

19-158

Date: 

September 1, 2020

Author(s):

Faez Sayahi, Mats Emborg, Hans Hedlund, and Andrzej Cwirzen

Publication:

Materials Journal

Volume:

117

Issue:

5

Abstract:

This research studies the effect of retarder, accelerator, stabilizer, air-entraining agent, and shrinkage-reducing admixture (SRA) on plastic shrinkage cracking in self-consolidating concrete (SCC). The main objective is to identify the dominant cracking cause—that is, plastic settlement or plastic shrinkage—in an SCC containing a particular admixture. During experimentation, crack-free concretes were achieved by adding air-entraining agent and SRA, while accelerator and retarder increased the crack area. The impact of admixtures on the cracking mechanism was identified by comparing the respective vertical and horizontal deformations. It was observed that the crack-free concretes had moderate settlement and horizontal shrinkage, while the cracked specimens exhibited significant deformation either vertically or horizontally.

DOI:

10.14359/51724623


Document: 

19-312

Date: 

September 1, 2020

Author(s):

Ahmed T. Omar, Mohamed M. Sadek, and Assem A. A. Hassan

Publication:

Materials Journal

Volume:

117

Issue:

5

Abstract:

This study aims to evaluate the impact resistance and mechanical properties of a number of developed lightweight self-consolidating concrete (LWSCC) mixtures under cold temperatures. To achieve LWSCC mixtures with minimum possible density, the authors explored different replacement levels of normalweight fine or coarse aggregates by lightweight fine and coarse expanded slate aggregates. The studied parameters included testing temperature (+20°C, 0°C, and –20°C), type of lightweight aggregate (either fine or coarse expanded slate aggregates), binder content (550 and 600 kg/m3 [34.3 and 37.5 lb/ft3]), coarse-to-fine (C/F) aggregate ratio (0.7 and 1.0), and the use of polyvinyl alcohol (PVA) fibers (fibered and nonfibered mixtures). The results indicated that for all tested mixtures, decreasing the temperature of concrete below room temperature significantly improved the mechanical properties and impact resistance. Increasing the percentage of lightweight fine or coarse aggregate in the mixture showed more improvement in the mechanical properties and impact resistance under cold temperatures. However, the failure mode of all tested specimens appeared to be more brittle under subzero temperatures. It was also observed that the inclusion of PVA fibers helped to compensate for the brittleness that resulted from decreasing the temperature, and it further enhanced the impact resistance and mechanical properties under low temperatures.

DOI:

10.14359/51725975


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