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International Concrete Abstracts Portal

Showing 1-5 of 559 Abstracts search results

Document: 

SP-360_03

Date: 

March 1, 2024

Author(s):

Abubakar S. Ishaq, Maria M. Lopez, Charles E. Bakis, and Yoseok Jeong

Publication:

Symposium Papers

Volume:

360

Abstract:

This study evaluates the bond performance of concrete epoxy bonds using an image segmentation-based image processing technique. The Concrete Epoxy Interface (CEI) plays a crucial role in the structural performance of FRP-repaired concrete as it transfers stresses from the concrete to the epoxy. By employing the image segmentation technique, the performance of the CEI is assessed through the ratio of Interfacial Failure (IF) to other failure types, namely cohesive failure in Epoxy (CE) and Cohesive cracks in Concrete (CC). The effects of sustained loading duration on CEI bond performance are quantitatively analyzed using 21 single-lap shear (SLS) specimens and 28 notched 3-Point Bending (3PB) specimens. The findings highlight vital conclusions: CE is the least failure mode in SLS and 3PB specimens. In contrast, CC is the predominant failure mode, indicating the susceptibility of the concrete substrate in FRP-repaired concrete. Moreover, IF generally increases with longer sustained loading durations in 3PB specimens but decreases with increased loading duration in SLS specimens. The study also demonstrates the effectiveness of the image segmentation approach in evaluating CEI performance in 3PB specimens, where color distinguishes epoxy, FRP, and concrete substrate.

DOI:

10.14359/51740615


Document: 

SP360

Date: 

March 1, 2024

Author(s):

ACI Committee 440

Publication:

Symposium Papers

Volume:

360

Abstract:

The 16th International Symposium on Fiber-Reinforced Polymer (FRP) Reinforcement for Concrete Structures (FRPRCS-16) was organized by ACI Committee 440 (Fiber-Reinforced Polymer Reinforcement) and held on March 23 and 24, 2024, at the ACI Spring 2024 Convention in New Orleans, LA. FRPRCS-16 gathers researchers, practitioners, owners, and manufacturers from the United States and abroad, involved in the use of FRPs as reinforcement for concrete and masonry structures, both for new construction and for strengthening and rehabilitation of existing structures. FRPRCS is the longest running conference series on the application of FRP in civil construction, commencing in Vancouver, BC, in 1993. FRPRCS has been one of the two official conference series of the International Institute for FRP in Construction (IIFC) since 2018 (the other is the CICE series). These conference series rotate between Europe, Asia, and the Americas, with alternating years between CICE and FRPRCS. The ACI convention has previously cosponsored the FRPRCS symposium in Anaheim (2017), Tampa (2011), Kansas City (2005), and Baltimore (1999). This Special Publication contains a total of 52 peer-reviewed technical manuscripts from 20 different countries from around the world. Papers are organized in the following topics: (1) FRP Bond and Anchorage in Concrete Structures; (2) Strengthening of Concrete Structures using FRP Systems; (3) FRP Materials, Properties, Tests and Standards; (4) Emerging FRP Systems and Successful Project Applications; (5) FRP-Reinforced Concrete Structures; (6) Advances in FRP Applications in Masonry Structures; (7) Seismic Resistance of FRP-Reinforced/Strengthened Concrete Structures; (8) Behavior of Prestressed Concrete Structures; (9) FRP Use in column Applications; (10) Effect of Extreme Events on FRP-Reinforced/Strengthened Structures; (11) Durability of FRP Systems; and (12) Advanced Analysis of FRP Reinforced Concrete Structures. The breadth and depth of the knowledge presented in these papers is clear evidence of the maturity of the field of composite materials in civil infrastructure. The ACI Committee 440 is witness to this evolution, with its first published ACI CODE-440.11, “Building Code Requirements for Structural Concrete with Glass Fiber Reinforced Polymer (CFRP) Bars,” published in 2022. A second code document on fiber reinforced polymer for repair and rehabilitation of concrete is under development. The publication of the sixteenth volume in the symposium series could not have occurred without the support and dedication of many individuals. The editors would like to recognize the authors who diligently submitted their original papers; the reviewers, many of them members of ACI Committee 440, who provided critical review and direction to improve these papers; ACI editorial staff who guided the publication process; and the support of the American Concrete Institute (ACI) and the International Institute for FRP in Construction (IIFC) during the many months of preparation for the Symposium.

DOI:

10.14359/51740670


Document: 

SP-360_35

Date: 

March 1, 2024

Author(s):

Ramin Rameshni, PhD, P.Eng., Reza Sadjadi, PhD, P.Eng, Melanie Knowles, P.Eng., M.Eng.

Publication:

Symposium Papers

Volume:

360

Abstract:

Deterioration of concrete bridges has resulted in reduction of their service lives and increase in required maintenance which is associated with cost and inconvenience to the public. A prevalent cause of concrete bridge deterioration is corrosion which initiates by chloride ions penetration past the protecting layers and by corroding the steel reinforcement. Because corrosion in prestressed concrete members has more serious consequences than in non-prestressed reinforced concrete, it is important that bridge designers and inspectors be aware of the potential problems and environments that may cause the issue and address them as soon as they are detected. This paper discusses a case study of a highway bridge (Hyndman Bridge, Ontario) including its deterioration, causes, mitigation measures, structural evaluation and the selected repair method. The rehabilitation design is based on guidelines of the latest editions of the CHDBC and ACI 440.2R. CFRP strengthening techniques have been proposed to address the flexure and shear deficient capacity of deteriorated girders. It is concluded that by using a suitable repair methodology employing CFRP, it is possible to upgrade the bridge to comply with the latest requirements of the code and increase the service life of the structure which otherwise would have needed imminent replacement.

DOI:

10.14359/51740647


Document: 

SP-360_09

Date: 

March 1, 2024

Author(s):

Juan Torres Acosta and Douglas Tomlinson

Publication:

Symposium Papers

Volume:

360

Abstract:

Three bridge barriers were tested under pseudo-static loading to assess the effectiveness of a dowelling repair technique for restoring the capacity of damaged glass fiber-reinforced polymer (GFRP) reinforced systems. Barriers were 1500 mm (59.1 in.) wide and tested with an overhang of 1500 mm (59.1 in.). One barrier was entirely reinforced with steel reinforcement with the layout and geometry common in Alberta, Canada for highway applications. A second barrier replaced all steel reinforcement with GFRP bars. The third barrier simulates repair where the barrier is damaged and needs to be replaced by removing the barrier, drilling holes, and using epoxy to dowel GFRP bars into the deck. All barriers failed by concrete splitting at the barrier/deck interface which is attributed to the complex interaction of stresses from the barrier wall and overhang. The steel reinforced barrier was strongest but had slightly lower energy dissipation than the GFRP reinforced barriers. The repaired GFRP reinforced barrier had very similar response to the baseline GFRP reinforced barrier but reached a slightly larger capacity. Previously completed finite element models showed similar general responses and failure modes but larger stiffnesses and strengths than the tests which requires further investigation.

DOI:

10.14359/51740621


Document: 

SP358_01

Date: 

October 1, 2023

Author(s):

Basem H. AbdelAleem and Assem A. A. Hassan

Publication:

Symposium Papers

Volume:

358

Abstract:

This study aims to present a new technology for repairing/strengthening lightweight concrete (LWC) elements. Rubberized engineered cementitious composite (RECC) was used to repair/strengthen LWC specimens to develop a lightweight composite with superior mechanical properties and impact resistance. Two different sizes of rubber aggregate were used in RECC: crumb rubber (CR) and powder rubber (PR). The studied parameters included different RECC layer thicknesses and different cross-section locations. The tested properties were compressive strength, splitting tensile strength, flexural strength, drop weight impact resistance, and flexural impact resistance. The bond strength at the interface between LWC and RECC was also investigated. The results revealed that repair/strengthening LWC with RECC layer showed a promising lightweight composite with enhanced mechanical properties and impact resistance. Using CR in the RECC repair layer showed better enhancement in the drop weight impact resistance than using PR, while using PR was more significant in enhancing the composite’s static flexural strength and flexural impact resistance. The results also revealed that the flexural impact resistance of the sample was significantly enhanced when RECC layer was placed on the tension side (bottom side), while the drop-weight impact resistance was noticeably improved when RECC was placed on the compression side (top side).

DOI:

10.14359/51740228


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