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International Concrete Abstracts Portal

Showing 1-3 of 3 Abstracts search results

Document: 

19-277

Date: 

May 1, 2020

Author(s):

Yu-Dong Xie, Xu-Jian Lin, Hong-Hong Ai, and Tao Ji

Publication:

Materials Journal

Volume:

117

Issue:

3

Abstract:

In this study, the impact of expanded perlite (EP) and expanded vermiculite (EV) on the refractory properties of magnesium potassium phosphate cement (MKPC)-based fire-resistant materials were investigated. The physical and mechanical properties of MKPC paste were tested, and its fire retardancy properties were studied in detail. The results indicate that the incorporation of EP or EV to MKPC-based refractories brings a notable improvement in the fire resistance and makes a reduction in the apparent density. However, compared with EV-MKPC, the porosity of EP-MKPC is larger and its moisture content is higher, so the thermal insulation performance of EP-MKPC is better than that of EV-MKPC at the same content.

DOI:

10.14359/51724599


Document: 

90-M10

Date: 

January 1, 1993

Author(s):

ACI Committee 544

Publication:

Materials Journal

Volume:

90

Issue:

1

Abstract:

Guide describes the current technology in specifying, proportioning, mixing, placing, and finishing of steel fiber reinforced concrete (SFRC). Much of the current conventional concrete practice applies to SFRC. The emphasis in the guide is to describe the differences between conventional concrete and SFRC and how to deal with them. Guidance is provided in mixing techniques to achieve uniform mixtures, placement techniques to assure adequate compaction, and finishing techniques to assure satisfactory surface textures. Sample mix proportions are tabulated. A listing of references is provided covering proportioning, properties, refractory uses, shotcrete technology, and general information on SFRC.

DOI:

10.14359/4046


Document: 

85-M02

Date: 

January 1, 1988

Author(s):

Thomas Novinson and John Crahan

Publication:

Materials Journal

Volume:

85

Issue:

1

Abstract:

Lithium salts have been reported as set accelerators of high-alumina (80 to 90 percent) concretes and mortars. However, it has been determined that the lithium salts also accelerate the setting of medium-alumina (40 percent) concretes containing considerable silica. The reaction rates of the accelerated setting are related to the pH of the lithium salt in the mixing water, the concentration of the lithium salt, and the type of anion in the lithium salt. Proper selection of the lithium salt and the concentration can lead to quick-setting concretes without loss in quality. The nonhalide lithium salts may have an advantage over calcium chloride and other halide-set accelerators that have been found to be highly corrosive to steel reinforcement in concrete. Since the lithium salts act as catalysts and cause hydration of the cement, components without entering the stoichiometry of the reactions, very small amounts of the salts can be used to accelerate the concrete setting reaction.

DOI:

10.14359/2471


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