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International Concrete Abstracts Portal

Showing 1-5 of 15 Abstracts search results

Document: 

SP-334-02

Date: 

September 30, 2019

Author(s):

Anol Mukhopadhyay and Xijun Shi

Publication:

Symposium Papers

Volume:

334

Abstract:

Potential issues associated with depletion of good aggregate sources and management of excess RAP stockpiles increasingly motivate use of RAP in PCC as a coarse aggregate replacement. Texas has shown great interest in disposing excess RAP stockpiles and a systematic study on using RAP in PCC for Texas pavement applications was conducted by the authors recently. This paper provides a concise summary of the findings from this study. The major conclusions are (1) PCC mixture with dense aggregate gradation can be achieved by adding coarse RAP with adequate intermediate sized particles, which offers better overall performance in terms of workability and mechanical properties, (2) RAP-PCC with coarse RAP replacement up to 40% showed considerable reduction for modulus of rupture. Asphalt cohesive failure (crack passing through the asphalt layer) was found to be the main mechanism responsible for the strength reductions, (3) the addition of allowable amounts of RAP into PCC provides equivalent durability performance relative to plain PCC, and (4) constructing pavements with RAP-PCC yields economic, environmental and social benefits.


Document: 

SP310-02

Date: 

March 17, 2017

Author(s):

Barzin Mobasher

Publication:

Symposium Papers

Volume:

310

Abstract:

The ACI Committee 544 on fibre-reinforced concrete (FRC) has been involved in development and dissemination of technical information for nearly a half century. A key advantage in using FRC is the reduction in construction time compared to the traditional reinforcing bars or welded wire mesh. Application areas for FRC have extended to areas where high early strength and ductility are important and include pavement, shotcrete and structures such as bridge deck slabs, or rock slide stabilization. In these cases, the material properties must be measured using experimental test data obtained from an experimental program. Test results must be analysed in order to obtain effective stress strain responses that can be incorporated in analytical, or computer simulation. A list of examples including wall panels, hydraulic structures, airport pavements, and industrial floor overlays are described. To maintain integrity without collapse, such structural elements need to be designed with proper material models and analysis tools discussed.


Document: 

SP314-05

Date: 

March 1, 2017

Author(s):

Michael Berry, Bethany Kappes, and David Schroeder

Publication:

Symposium Papers

Volume:

314

Abstract:

This paper documents research focused on evaluating the feasibility of using minimally processed reclaimed asphalt pavement (RAP) as aggregate replacement in concrete pavements. A statistical experimental design procedure (response surface methodology – RSM) was used to investigate proportioning RAP concrete mixtures to achieve desired performance criteria. Based on the results of the RSM investigation, two concrete mixtures were selected for further evaluation: a high RAP mix with fine and coarse aggregate replacement rates (by volume) of 50 and 100 percent respectively, and a “high” strength mix with one half of the RAP used in the high RAP mix. These two concrete mixtures were subjected to a suite of mechanical and durability tests, and were used in a field demonstration project to evaluate their potential use in pavements. Mechanical properties tested were compressive and tensile strength, elastic modulus, shrinkage, and creep. Durability tests included alkali-silica reactivity, absorption, abrasion, chloride permeability, freeze-thaw resistance, and scaling. Overall, both mixes performed adequately in these mechanical and durability tests, although the inclusion of RAP negatively impacted most of the tested properties relative to those of control mixes made with 100 percent conventional aggregates.


Document: 

SP263-04

Date: 

October 1, 2009

Author(s):

P.R. Rangaraju

Publication:

Symposium Papers

Volume:

263

Abstract:

The Federal Highway Administration (FHWA) under its Testing and Evaluation program (TE-30) on High-Performance Concrete (HPC) pavements had initiated several field demonstration projects to evaluate the use of new technology to improve the long-term performance of the pavements. Under this program, the Minnesota Department of Transportation (Mn/DOT) has successfully completed the construction of the first 60-year design life HPC pavement in the state along Interstate I-35W. Significant changes to materials-related specifications that affect the long-term performance of the concrete pavement were implemented in this project. This paper will provide a brief description of the Mn/DOT’s first HPC pavement project along with key design features of the pavement, including use of slag cement in high-performance concrete mixtures, higher level of entrained air content than that is conventionally used, and stainless steel dowel bars. Also, the results of quality control tests conducted on field concrete during construction are presented.

DOI:

10.14359/51663252


Document: 

SP262-20

Date: 

October 1, 2009

Author(s):

E. Koehler, M. Offenberg, J. Malone, and A.A. Jeknavorian

Publication:

Symposium Papers

Volume:

262

Abstract:

Pervious concrete contains a high void content to allow the passage of water and is often used in pavements to reduce storm water runoff and ponding, improve water quality, and recharge groundwater. Successful pervious concrete for pavement applications must be quickly discharged from a ready mixed concrete truck, achieve consistent compaction without paste draining to the bottom of the pavement, allow sufficient time before the application of curing, and achieve adequate strength and durability. Obtaining these properties requires unique paste rheology and setting characteristics, which are enabled through the proper selection of chemical admixtures. In this paper, novel lab tests are used to quantify the effects of individual admixtures; namely a retarder, polycarboxylate-based high-range waterreducer, and bio-gum type viscosity modifying admixture. The benefits of using a combination of these three admixtures are demonstrated.

DOI:

10.14359/51663238


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