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Showing 1-5 of 2093 Abstracts search results

Document: 

SP-349_13

Date: 

April 22, 2021

Author(s):

Gonzalo A. Lozano Rengifo, Mayra T. de Grazia, Leandro F. M. Sanchez, and Edward G. Sherwood

Publication:

Symposium Papers

Volume:

349

Abstract:

Reducing Normal Portland Cement (NPC) has been a major concern of concrete industry and research community over the last 2-3 decades. As much as 8% of the global CO2 emissions stem from clinker production. Hence, a wide number of research projects have been focusing on reducing NPC in cementitious materials using numerous strategies such as the use of supplementary cementing materials (SMC’s), limestone fillers (LF) and/or advanced mixproportioning techniques. Yet, the impact of these procedures on the overall behaviour of materials with low NPC content, especially in the fresh state and long-term durability, is still not fully understood. This work aims to understand the influence of the distance between the fine particles, the so-called Inter-Particle Separation (IPS), on the fresh state behaviour of cement-base pastes designed through the use of Particle Packing Models and incorporating LF. Evaluations on the fresh (i.e. rheological behaviour and setting time) and hardened states (compressive strength) were conducted in all mixtures. Results show that IPS directly correlates with the viscosity of cementbase pastes for all shear rates appraised. Moreover, the use of LF increases the hydration rate of NPC pastes. Finally, it is clear that the water-to-cement ratio keeps being the main factor controlling the compressive strength of cement pastes with reduced NPC content and high levels of LF replacement.


Document: 

SP348

Date: 

March 19, 2021

Publication:

Symposium Papers

Volume:

348

Abstract:

Sponsors: Sponsored by ACI Committee 351 Editor: Carl A. Nelson This special publication grew out of the Technical Session entitled “Application of ACI 351-C Report on Dynamic Foundations,” held at the ACI Spring 2019 Convention in Québec City, Québec. Following this event, Committee 351 decided to undertake a special publication with contributions from those session participants willing to develop their presentations into full-length papers. Three papers included in the current publication were contributed by these presenters and their coauthors, with six additional papers provided by others. All but one of the papers deal with the subject matter of ACI 351.3—Foundations for Dynamic Equipment—updated in 2018. The one exception (the paper of Wang and Fang on wind turbine foundations) provides valuable information to engineers dealing with a lack of consistent design criteria among various codes for reinforced concrete foundations subjected to high-cycle fatigue loads. I would like to thank the members of ACI Committee 351 for their support, in particular the current main Committee and Subcommittee C Chairpersons Susan Isble and Dr. Mukti L. Das, respectively. I also wish to express my gratitude to the authors for their perseverance through the difficult circumstances of 2020, and to the reviewers who generously contributed their time and expertise to this publication. Last, but not least, I want to thank my wife Cindy for tolerating me (and the growing piles of paper) over the past several months as the deadline approached. Carl A. Nelson On behalf of ACI Committee 351 Minneapolis, December 2020


Document: 

SP347

Date: 

March 15, 2021

Publication:

Symposium Papers

Volume:

347

Abstract:

Sponsors: Sponsored by ACI 370 Committee Editors: Eric Jacques and Mi G. Chorzepa This Symposium Volume reports on the latest developments in the field of high strain rate mechanics and behavior of concrete subject to impact loads. This effort supports the mission of ACI Committee 370 “Blast and Impact Load Effects” to develop and disseminate information on the design of concrete structures subjected to impact, as well as blast and other short-duration dynamic loads. Concrete structures can potentially be exposed to accidental and malicious impact loads during their lifetimes, including those caused by ballistic projectiles, vehicular collision, impact of debris set in motion after an explosion, falling objects during construction and floating objects during tsunamis and storm surges. Assessing the performance of concrete structures to implement cost-effective and structurally-efficient protective measures against these extreme impacting loads necessitates a fundamental understanding of the high strain rate behavior of the constituent materials and of the characteristics of the local response modes activated during the event. This volume presents fourteen papers which provide the reader with deep insight into the state-of-the-art experimental research and cutting-edge computational approaches for concrete materials and structures subject to impact loading. Invited contributions were received from international experts from Australia, Canada, China, Czech Republic, Germany, South Korea, Switzerland, and the United States. The technical papers cover a range of cementitious materials, including high strength and ultra-high strength materials, reactive powder concrete, fiber-reinforced concrete, and externally bonded cementitious layers and other coatings. The papers were to be presented during two technical sessions scheduled for the ACI Spring 2020 Convention in Rosemont, Illinois, but the worldwide COVID-19 pandemic disrupted those plans. The editors thank the authors for their outstanding efforts to showcase their most current research work with the concrete community, and for their assistance, cooperation, and valuable contributions throughout the entire publication process. The editors also thank the members of ACI Committee 370, the reviewers, and the ACI staff for their generous support and encouragement throughout the preparation of this volume.


Document: 

SP346

Date: 

March 9, 2021

Author(s):

Sponsored by ACI Committee 345

Publication:

Symposium Papers

Volume:

346

Abstract:

A Sustainable built-environment requires a comprehensive process from material selection through to reliable management. Although traditional materials and methods still dominate the design and construction of our civil infrastructure, nonconventional reinforcing and strengthening methods for concrete bridges and structures can address the functional and economic challenges facing modern society. The use of advanced materials, such as fiber reinforced polymer (FRP) and ultra-high performance concrete (UHPC), alleviates the unfavorable aspects of every-day practices, offers many new opportunities, and promotes strategies that will be cost-effective, durable, and readily maintainable. Field demonstration is imperative to validate the innovative concepts and findings of laboratory research. Furthermore, documented case studies add value to the evaluation of emerging and maturing technologies, identify successful applications or aspects needing refinement, and ultimately inspire future endeavors. This Special Publication (SP) contains nine papers selected from three technical sessions held during the virtual ACI Fall Convention of October 2020. The first and second series of papers discuss retrofit and strengthening of super- and substructure members with a variety of techniques; and the remaining papers address new construction of bridges with internal FRP reinforcing and prestressing in beam, slabs, decks and retaining walls. All manuscripts were reviewed by at least two experts in accordance with the ACI publication policy. The Editors wish to thank all contributing authors and anonymous reviewers for their rigorous efforts. The Editors also gratefully acknowledge Ms. Barbara Coleman at ACI for her knowledgeable guidance.


Document: 

SP-347_07

Date: 

March 1, 2021

Author(s):

Andrew D. Sorensen, Robert J. Thomas, Ryan Langford and Abdullah Al-Sarfin

Publication:

Symposium Papers

Volume:

347

Abstract:

The impact resistance of concrete is becoming an increasingly important component of insuring the durability and resilience of critical civil engineering infrastructure. Design engineers are not currently able to use impact resistance as a performance-based specification in concrete due to a lack of a reliable standardized impact test for concrete. An improved method of the ACI standard, ACI 544.2R-89 Measurement of Properties of Fiber Reinforced Concrete, is developed that provides a resistance curve as a function of impact energy and number of blows (N) to failure. The curve provides information about the life cycle (N) under repeated sub-critical impact events and an estimate of the critical impact energy (where N=1), whereas the previous method provided only a relative value. The generated impact-fatigue curve provides useful information about damage accumulation under repeated impact events and the effectiveness of the fiber-reinforcement. In this paper, the improved method is demonstrated for three fiber types: steel, copolymer polypropylene, and a monofilament polypropylene. Additionally, the analytical solution for the specimen geometry is given as well as the theoretical considerations behind the development of the impact-life curve. The use of a specimen geometry provides a path to generalize the test results to full-scale structures.


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