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International Concrete Abstracts Portal

Showing 1-5 of 1063 Abstracts search results

Document: 

SP-360_13

Date: 

March 1, 2024

Author(s):

Girish Narayan Prajapati, Shehab Mehany, Wenxue Chen, and Brahim Benmokrane

Publication:

Symposium Papers

Volume:

360

Abstract:

This paper presents an experimental study that investigated the physical and mechanical properties of the helical wrap glass fiber-reinforced polymer (GFRP) bars. The physical tests are conducted to check the feasibility and quality of the production process through the cross-sectional area and evaluation of the fiber content, moisture absorption, and glass transition temperature of the specimens. While the mechanical tests in this study included testing of the GFRP specimens to determine their tensile properties, transverse shear, and bond strength. Four bar sizes (#3, #4, #5, and #6), representing the range of GFRP reinforcing bars used in practice as longitudinal reinforcement in concrete members subjected to bending, are selected in this investigation. The GFRP bars had a helical wrap surface. The tensile failure of the GFRP bars started with rupture of glass fibers followed by interlaminar delamination and bar crushing. The bond strength of the GFRP bars satisfied the limits in ASTM D7957/D7957M. The test results reveal that the helical wrap GFRP bars had physical and mechanical properties within the standard limits.

DOI:

10.14359/51740625


Document: 

SP-360_17

Date: 

March 1, 2024

Author(s):

Faisal Mukhtar

Publication:

Symposium Papers

Volume:

360

Abstract:

The first phase of this work uses experimental evidence to critique some shortcomings of the so-called improved double-lap bond shear tests regarding their limited application to wet layup fiber-reinforced polymer (FRP) and their inapplicability to pultruded FRP laminates. Even in the case of the wet layup FRP, the study provides some evidence of high chances of obtaining undesirable fiber rupture that preclude the use of the results as reliable means for interpreting the FRP-concrete bond-slip models. Further proposed modifications to overcome these challenges are provided by designing a convertible bond tester applicable to both wet layup and pultruded FRP laminates. Apart from the application of the apparatus to FRP-concrete bond assessment under pure double shear, it proved to be applicable to conducting mixed-mode bond tests. The second phase of the work upgrades the so-designed test apparatus to make it convertible to bond testing of other variants (near-surface mounted [NSM] FRP bars/strips, fiber-reinforced cementitious mortar [FRCM], etc.) of strengthening systems without developing a different apparatus for each. The apparatus allows testing the NSM FRP-concrete bond in a novel manner compared to the traditional practice. Also, given the absence of mixed-mode studies for FRCM, the apparatus provides a pioneer means of conducting the same.

DOI:

10.14359/51740629


Document: 

SP-360_09

Date: 

March 1, 2024

Author(s):

Juan Torres Acosta and Douglas Tomlinson

Publication:

Symposium Papers

Volume:

360

Abstract:

Three bridge barriers were tested under pseudo-static loading to assess the effectiveness of a dowelling repair technique for restoring the capacity of damaged glass fiber-reinforced polymer (GFRP) reinforced systems. Barriers were 1500 mm (59.1 in.) wide and tested with an overhang of 1500 mm (59.1 in.). One barrier was entirely reinforced with steel reinforcement with the layout and geometry common in Alberta, Canada for highway applications. A second barrier replaced all steel reinforcement with GFRP bars. The third barrier simulates repair where the barrier is damaged and needs to be replaced by removing the barrier, drilling holes, and using epoxy to dowel GFRP bars into the deck. All barriers failed by concrete splitting at the barrier/deck interface which is attributed to the complex interaction of stresses from the barrier wall and overhang. The steel reinforced barrier was strongest but had slightly lower energy dissipation than the GFRP reinforced barriers. The repaired GFRP reinforced barrier had very similar response to the baseline GFRP reinforced barrier but reached a slightly larger capacity. Previously completed finite element models showed similar general responses and failure modes but larger stiffnesses and strengths than the tests which requires further investigation.

DOI:

10.14359/51740621


Document: 

SP-361_07

Date: 

March 1, 2024

Author(s):

Julie K. Buffenbarger, Michael A. Mahoney, and Hessam AzariJaFari

Publication:

Symposium Papers

Volume:

361

Abstract:

Worldwide, the need for additional and improved infrastructure is critical. The deterioration of infrastructure has become an increasing challenge and burden on the world's economy, environment, and society. Historically, most structures worldwide have been built without durability and service-life consideration, and their premature failure reflects an acute crisis within the construction industry and the environment. Including synthetic polypropylene macrofiber in concrete structures ensures the maximizing of durability and service life extension and offers potential reductions in the binder content and reinforcing steel materials that contribute to resource depletion, environmental impacts, and increased economic burden. These material reductions and service life improvements present housing and infrastructure construction opportunities that protect the environment and ensure public safety, health, security, serviceability, and life cycle cost-effectiveness.

DOI:

10.14359/51740609


Document: 

SP-360_02

Date: 

March 1, 2024

Author(s):

John J. Myers

Publication:

Symposium Papers

Volume:

360

Abstract:

The American Concrete Institute (ACI) 440.1R-15 Guide for the Design and Construction of Structural Concrete Reinforced with Fiber-Reinforced Polymer (FRP) Bars linearly reduces the bar stress and thereby pull-out capacity of FRP bars to zero from an embedment length at 20 bar diameters (db) or less. Most experimental research and data examine the development length of various FRP bars at longer, more traditional, embedment lengths. A database was created from select available data in literature to compare to empirical standards. This investigation examines the bond performance of short embedded FRP bars into concrete considering a pull-out failure mode to expand the understanding of short embedded FRP bars into concrete. Based upon the database collected, for the glass fiber-reinforced polymer (GFRP) rebars, the current 440.1R appear quite conservative. For the basalt fiber-reinforced polymer (BFRP) rebar database collected, the current ACI 440.1R-15 provisions appear unconservative for a statistically significant number of the specimen test results within the database. In the case of the carbon fiber-reinforced polymer (CFRP) database, which is quite limited, the data appears to develop considerably less bond strength than the current 440.1R provisions might suggest which requires deeper investigation for the case of short embedment length bonded CFRP bars.

DOI:

10.14359/51740614


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