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International Concrete Abstracts Portal

Showing 1-10 of 14 Abstracts search results

Document: 

SP98-13

Date: 

March 3, 1987

Author(s):

P. Balaguru

Publication:

Special Publication

Volume:

98

Abstract:

Presents an algorithm for a program code for the analysis of concrete columns reinforced with nonprestressed reinforcement, prestressed reinforcement, or both. The algorithm can be used to generate the coordinates of the load-moment interaction diagram for the section chosen in terms of shape; material properties; and type, amount and location of nonprestressed and prestressed reinforcement. Three shapes--namely rectangular, T, and I--can be analyzed. Hollow-core wall panels can be analyzed by converting them to equivalent I-sections. The lateral reinforcement could be ties, spirals, or none. The program can also be coded to reanalyze the section for revised partial input. This capability aids the designer in generating the loads and moment for, say, a different compressive strength of concrete without reinputting the entire design data. The load-moment values can be printed to look like the load-moment interaction diagram. The various assumptions involved, the equations, and the sequence of calculations are explained using a number of flow charts. A procedure is outlined for using the program for design purposes. Example problems are provided to illustrate the input-output variables. The program code, written in BASIC for Apple desktop computer, can be obtained from the author. The algorithm deals with only the strength aspect. The serviceability aspect, especially for prestressed columns, should be checked separately.

10.14359/3111


Document: 

SP98-12

Date: 

March 3, 1987

Author(s):

A. Casas and I. J. Oppenheim

Publication:

Special Publication

Volume:

98

Abstract:

Spreadsheet programming is presented as a new programming alternative for solving daily calculations in the engineering design office. Two spreadsheet programs with different applications are used to introduce the reader to this technique. A retaining wall template demonstrates the advantage of altering one design parameter and seeing the results propagate instantly, thus leaving the engineer with a very responsive tool. A prestressed bridge template organizes in separate windows the engineering design process involved in the prestress design. The template is written according to the design requirements of AASHTO. It allows the engineer to verify different alternatives in the design of the concrete girder, hence leading to a manually optimized section.

10.14359/3102


Document: 

SP98-11

Date: 

March 3, 1987

Author(s):

R. Drahushak-Crow

Publication:

Special Publication

Volume:

98

Abstract:

Microcomputer applications are continually expanding into new fields, including the area of concrete construction. The dissemination of information concerning these applications promotes their growth and development and benefits the construction industry. When the Bureau of Reclamation began planning Upper Stillwater Dam, the largest roller-compacted concrete (RCC) dam to date in the U.S., due consideration was given to the management of the myriad of concrete test data that would be generated during this rapid method of construction. Using a microcomputer system to facilitate proper treatment of these data would serve several important purposes: 1) provide an overall view of quality control of the RCC, and act as a quality assurance tool; 2) provide a quick method for updating mix design quantities based on variations in materials; and 3) provide access to the data for a comprehensive review of this state-of-the-art method of construction. Both the programming structure and the capabilities of the program will be discussed. The qualifications for developing an RCC quality control system required that the program be user friendly so that it could be readily used by construction inspectors and laboratory technicians. The system provides record keeping for all RCC tests and RCC materials tests, including concrete unit weight, concrete consistency measurements by vibrating table, nuclear density readings, cylinder compressive brake strengths, and aggregate gradations and moisture contents. The program also calculates adjusted mix proportions based on moisture content and clean separation of the aggregate. The RCC quality control system is written in dBASE III, and the host is an IBM-XT microcomputer. The system is connected to a mainframe computer in Denver via modem so that data can be periodically reviewed by designers and for long-term storage.

10.14359/3557


Document: 

SP98-10

Date: 

March 3, 1987

Author(s):

T. L. Weinmann, K. N. Shiu, and N. W. Hanson

Publication:

Special Publication

Volume:

98

Abstract:

The microcomputer and associated digital technology has changed the way things are done both in the structural laboratory and in the field. The impact of microcomputers on the science of field measurement is mainly with regard to cost and time. The many benefits of field monitoring of structures are now available at an acceptable cost. Cost is reduced due to automatic recording rather than manual methods. This paper discusses the benefits of field monitoring during construction and the life of the structure. Two proven measuring systems are described in detail. The paper also describes a system for dynamic analysis of structures. The reduced cost of determining the behavior of buildings and bridges is not the only benefit of these three new measuring systems. Data returned for analysis are in a form that can be quickly reduced and evaluated by computer. A short turn-around time means that the behavior data are available when needed.

10.14359/3549


Document: 

SP98-09

Date: 

March 3, 1987

Author(s):

S. N. Pollalis

Publication:

Special Publication

Volume:

98

Abstract:

A model for the design of a computer system to support decision making for the design of reinforced concrete structures is proposed. The process of analysis-design-drafting is transformed into a series of integrated operations performed upon a relational database. The computer tools used in structural engineering today are evaluated, and a model for planning their data integration has been developed. Databases are the backbone for the process of systematically storing and retrieving data to accumulate knowledge and support decisions. The focus of the paper is on identifying the requirements of databases suitable for structural analysis and design of reinforced concrete structures. A primer objective for such a database structure is to include data from engineering codes to provide information throughout the design. The importance of incorporating the ACI 318 Code and Commentary is emphasized and its implementation through a relational database is proposed.

10.14359/3094


Document: 

SP98-08

Date: 

March 3, 1987

Author(s):

D. P. Abrams

Publication:

Special Publication

Volume:

98

Abstract:

A computational procedure is described for determining nonlinear response of a building system subjected to earthquake motion. The method is sufficiently simple for use with a microcomputer because system response is expressed in terms of a single generalized coordinate. Deflected shapes for the systems are assumed to be invariant for all amplitudes of motion. The equation of motion is integrated for each instant of response on the basis of a normalized relation between base shear and top-level deflection. The hysteretic relation is constructed for each new cycle using cubic segments to express a path from initial unloading through force and deflection reversals to the point of maximum deflection. The base motion is selected from a menu of earthquake records stored on diskette. Results displayed on screen consist of histories of acceleration at the top-level and maximum interstory drift, and the computed force-deflection relation.

10.14359/2845


Document: 

SP98-07

Date: 

March 3, 1987

Author(s):

T. H. Wenzel

Publication:

Special Publication

Volume:

98

Abstract:

The computer-aided design field is expanding rapidly. There is an abundance of commercial and public domain software that is available. It is no longer necessary to write programs to introduce students to computer-aided design. The availability of spreadsheet programs has added a new dimension to computer-aided design. The principal advantage of a spreadsheet program is that it allows a series of relational steps to be programmed without having to know a programming language or having to write formal program statements. In addition, if a change is made in a particular step of a program, changes are automatically made in steps affected by that change. This can be a significant advantage in teaching reinforced concrete design. Students can use the templates created by the spreadsheet programs to answer "what if" questions about design. In this paper, several programs for the flexural design and shear design of reinforced concrete beams are described. These programs are not written in a programming language but are formulated with a spreadsheet program. The programs were run on a mainframe computer. The basic formulation of a spreadsheet program is described. Advantages of using spreadsheet programs in computer-aided design and their application in undergraduate courses in reinforced concrete design are discussed.

10.14359/3085


Document: 

SP98-06

Date: 

March 3, 1987

Author(s):

M. I. Hoit, F. E. Fagundo and J. Johnson

Publication:

Special Publication

Volume:

98

Abstract:

Presents a new computer design environment that allows the designer complete freedom in choosing design options. It combines three common tools--analysis, graphics, and a spreadsheet--into a completely integrated system. The environment allows the designer to take results directly from the analysis database, display them graphically, choose the values to be used for design, and then insert those values automatically into the spreadsheet environment. The spreadsheet can be customized, through the use of templates, to fit any design scheme. A template for the design of singly reinforced concrete beams is presented.

10.14359/3065


Document: 

SP98-05

Date: 

March 3, 1987

Author(s):

J. D. Glikin and R. G. Oesterle

Publication:

Special Publication

Volume:

98

Abstract:

Because of the presence of lateral loads and high-end eccentricities, the ACI 318-83 empirical design method cannot be used for design of tilt-up walls. Analysis must be performed during design to account for the P-{delta} effects. To confirm various design concepts and to evaluate the slenderness limitations, a series of tests on concrete wall panels was conducted. Several simplified design procedures were used to compare analytical results to test observations of slender load-bearing walls. Results of computer program TILT for IBM-PC (or compatible) computers were compared with the results of simplified design procedure calculations and test observations. Investigations show that the actual strength of load-bearing tilt-up walls are considerably higher than predicted by simplified analysis. The paper briefly discusses the theory of geometrical and material nonlinearities and presents methods for solutions that are incorporated in the program TILT. Conclusions and effectiveness of the TILT computer program for analyses of tilt-up load-bearing walls are shown.

10.14359/2839


Document: 

SP98-04

Date: 

March 3, 1987

Author(s):

J. T. Dewolf and J. Kou

Publication:

Special Publication

Volume:

98

Abstract:

Presents the results from a study of modeling concrete in the postcracking range using a three dimensional finite element analysis. The analytical work was based on an experimental study of concrete foundations which were loaded through bearing plates. The discrete cracking model was used, resulting in cracking which closely followed that in the tests. Comparisons have been made for different meshes, variable concrete material properties, and variable foundation dimensions. Failure occurred when the concrete foundation broke into segments, with a resulting loss in load-carrying capacity. The approach used is conceptually straightforward, lying between three-dimensional elastic analyses used in the past for concrete foundations and highly rigorous theoretical ones which have been used only for very limited applications.

10.14359/2833


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