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International Concrete Abstracts Portal

Showing 1-5 of 12 Abstracts search results

Document: 

SP92

Date: 

June 1, 1986

Author(s):

Editor: T.Z. Harmathy

Publication:

Symposium Papers

Volume:

92

Abstract:

SP92 This publication is a compilation of 11 papers dealing exclusively with the analysis and repairability of concrete damaged in building fires. Due to the importance of concrete and its role in the structural performance of modern buildings, the ability to deal with fire-damaged concrete is a central issue. This symposium volume combines the knowledge and experience of fire safety experts from around the world. The topics covered include the following: experience of fires in concrete structures; fires during nuclear power plant construction; assessment and repair of fire-damaged concrete; residual properties of concrete heated rapidly; and residual strength of fire-exposed reinforced concrete columns. Evaluation and Repair of Fire Damage to Concrete will give the reader substantial insight into both the problems and solutions associated with concrete which has been exposed to high temperatures.

DOI:

10.14359/14049


Document: 

SP92-09

Date: 

June 1, 1986

Author(s):

T T. Lie, T. J. Rowe, and T. D. Lin

Publication:

Symposium Papers

Volume:

92

Abstract:

A study was carried out to assess the residual strength of reinforced concrete columns after exposure to a standard fire for various lengths of time, and cooling. The use of a mathematical model, an ultrasonic pulse test method and a load test method are investigated. Calculated temperatures and residual strengths of test columns were compared with those measured. Comparisons were also made between calculated and measured pulse velocities. The results indicated that using the calculation procedure and the method of measuring pulse velocity described in the study, the residual strength of concrete columns can be assessed with an accuracy sufficient for practical purposes.

DOI:

10.14359/6517


Document: 

SP92-11

Date: 

June 1, 1986

Author(s):

A. Lammke

Publication:

Symposium Papers

Volume:

92

Abstract:

After actual fires with plastic materials involved concrete surfaces are often infested with high chloride concentrations, causing a serious risk of corrosion of the reinforcement. Absorption techniques with lime paste have been recommended to remove chlorides from concrete surfaces. To study this reaction concrete beams with different chloride contents, added as sodium chloride, were cast. The chloride distribution in the concrete before and after lime paste treatment and the chloride content of the used lime were determined analytically. The results show that the lime does not absorb chlorides, and within the concrete, the chlorides are redistributed. Further tests were made to study the rate of chloride absorption from aqueous solutions by lime, acti-vated carbon and ion exchange resins. The amount of absorbed chloride was very low. Corresponding the absorption of chlorides by fresh pastes of different cements and completely hydrated cements was studied. An effect of absorption but much more of chemical bond was shown.

DOI:

10.14359/6519


Document: 

SP92-02

Date: 

June 1, 1986

Author(s):

M. Diaz-Llanos, V. Sanchez Velasco, and I. Cerezo Preysler

Publication:

Symposium Papers

Volume:

92

Abstract:

In some cases, it is necessary to evaluate and document structures which were subjected to fires during construction. Due to the lack of official regulations on the subject, the analyses and documentation on these incidences, when reported to the regulatory authorities, implied unconventional activities, both for the utility and the A/E. The paper describes several fires affecting nuclear power plant concrete structures. They were all caused by inadvertent human actions. The presence of highly combustible auxiliary cons-truction materials contributed to their propagation. It is recommended that the cost (purchase and installation) of these auxiliary materials be evaluated against the use of alter nate (noncombustible)ones before making any decision, sufficiently in advance to avoid costly and time-consuming changes that may affect a usually tight schedule. As a result of visual inspection, followed by "in situ" and laboratory tests and engineering analyses of the affected elements, some elements had to be demolished and reconstructed while others were found to be acceptable.

DOI:

10.14359/6510


Document: 

SP92-01

Date: 

June 1, 1986

Author(s):

A. K. Tovey and R. N. Crook

Publication:

Symposium Papers

Volume:

92

Abstract:

This paper outlines the procedures adopted in obtaining information on fire-damaged concrete structures since 1975. Details are given on the information received from questionnaires and a summary of the building and construction types, damage and repairs are tabulated. The general conclusion is that concrete structures behave well under fire conditions with the majority of cases being repairable.

DOI:

10.14359/6509


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