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  • The International Concrete Abstracts Portal is an ACI led collaboration with leading technical organizations from within the international concrete industry and offers the most comprehensive collection of published concrete abstracts.

International Concrete Abstracts Portal

Showing 1-5 of 16 Abstracts search results

Document: 

SP90-11

Date: 

April 1, 1986

Author(s):

N. J. Gardner and Chi-Seng Chan

Publication:

Symposium Papers

Volume:

90

Abstract:

Multistory reinforced concrete structures are generally constructed using one level of shores and multiple levels of reshores. The stripping schedule is to completely strip a bay of shores before reshoring. Reshoring results in high-early-age construction loads being applied to the immature slab structures. Preshoring, or scheduled reshoring, is an attempt to reduce the adverse effects of clear bay reshoring by reducing the area stripped before reshoring. The load-strength ratio in preshored construction is little different to reshored construction but the loads are applied later which will reduce creep deflection effects. Using 2D and 3D models the slab, shore, and reshore loads were calculated for preshored construction. The advantage of preshoring is that the unsupported span lengths are reduced thus reducing slab deflections. The disadvantage of preshoring is that to realize the benefits close control of the construction process is needed.

DOI:

10.14359/1773


Document: 

SP90-02

Date: 

April 1, 1986

Author(s):

Jerome H. Ford

Publication:

Symposium Papers

Volume:

90

Abstract:

The density of well-designed and compacted concrete directly reflects the density of the facing material of the formwork. Therefore, high-density plastics and high-density overlaid plywoods produce the most consistent concrete color, texture, and density over multiple uses providing a few do's and don'ts are considered. These do's and don'ts can be consolidated into the desire of all involved: designer, contractor and supplier, wanting to make it work and look good. All rules and regulations are worthless unless everyone involved wants to produce quality.

DOI:

10.14359/1766


Document: 

SP90-13

Date: 

April 1, 1986

Author(s):

Stephen Timpson and James M. Henry

Publication:

Symposium Papers

Volume:

90

Abstract:

The Westbury Condominium Project is a forty story reinforced concrete tower surrounded by a five-story garage. The horizontal dimensions of the tower are only 41 x 41 ft. The design and construction management team worked within rigid parking, set-back, and height restrictions to produce a marketable building design on a difficult site in a heavily developed area. The contractor used time-lapse film analysis, video observation and an ongoing work crew training and motivation program to achieve a sustained 1.25 working day per tower floor construction cycle.

DOI:

10.14359/1775


Document: 

SP90-01

Date: 

April 1, 1986

Author(s):

Russel S. Fling

Publication:

Symposium Papers

Volume:

90

Abstract:

Economy in concrete construction is discussed in light of 3 challenges: 1) the challenge of economizing design, 2) the challenge of economizing construction, and 3) the challenge of standardizing construction. Procedures engineers may use to reduce the cost of construction are given. Suggestions for standardizing concrete construction include standards for concrete classes, column sizes, column spacing, column capitals, and tolerances.

DOI:

10.14359/1765


Document: 

SP90-10

Date: 

April 1, 1986

Author(s):

W.. Thomas Scott

Publication:

Symposium Papers

Volume:

90

Abstract:

As the speed of construction of concrete frame structures has increased and the sophistication of design has improved, there has been an increased need for a more thorough understanding as to the way construction loads are disbursed into the structure. During the 60's and 70's, several designers and researchers proposed methods of analyzing the loads in multistory structures during construction. A computer program employing one of these methods has been developed. In the 1982 PCA conference the author used the results of this proqram to show how the number of levels of equipment, cycle time, and attained concrete strength affected the number of levels of reshores required. This paper describes in detail the process used to calculate the reshorinq requirements for a 35 story flat plate structure built using a three day construction cycle. The discussion includes the practical implications of providing reshorinq for a mild steel structure. The hand calculation procedure presented parallels the computer program and is sufficiently detailed to provide the reader a practical procedure that can be used on the next project.

DOI:

10.14359/10062


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