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International Concrete Abstracts Portal

Showing 1-5 of 14 Abstracts search results

Document: 

SP84-01

Date: 

October 1, 1984

Author(s):

J. Penzien, H. Umemura, M. Watabe, and R. Hanson

Publication:

Symposium Papers

Volume:

84

Abstract:

This paper presents the background of activities leading to the current U.S.- Japan Cooperative Earthquake Engineering Research Program on the seismic perfornance of building structures which is being conducted under the auspices of the U.S.- Japan Panel on Wind and Seismic Effects, United States - Japan National Resources (U.J.N.R.) Program with major financial support provided by the U.S. National Science Foundation (NSF), the Japanese Ministry of Construction (MOC), and the Japanese Science and Technology Agency (STA). Also presented is a brief description of the current program and a statement on the coordination effort which is the responsibility of a Joint Technical Coordinating Committee (JTCC).

DOI:

10.14359/16888


Document: 

SP84-10

Date: 

October 1, 1984

Author(s):

M. Joglekar, P. Murry, J. Jirsa, and R. Klingner

Publication:

Symposium Papers

Volume:

84

Abstract:

Four full-scale beam column slab assemblies were tested under reversed cyclic loads. The test program included two interior and two exterior joint specimens. The first two specimens, one interior and one exterior, were identical to beam column joints in the second story of the full-scale seven story structure tested in Japan. I n the remaining two specimens the longitudinal reinforcement in the beams and the columns was increased to provide a variation in beam-to-slab strength. Results are presented to give an overview of the experimental program. The behavior of the four specimens under reversed cyclic loads was excellent up to story drift levels estimated to correspond to the maximum deflection level imposed on the seven story structure. The influence of the slab on the strength of the floor system under imposed deformations was significantly greater than would be anticipated using the ACI effective slab width as a flange for T-beam analysis.

DOI:

10.14359/16897


Document: 

SP84-12

Date: 

October 1, 1984

Author(s):

C. Wolfgram, D. Rothe, P. Wilson, and M. Sozen

Publication:

Symposium Papers

Volume:

84

Abstract:

Three one-tenth scale models of the large-scale reinforced concrete structure tested in Tsukuba, Japan, were built and tested at the University of Illinois, Urbane. The small-scale models were subjected to scaled earthquake motions in one horizontal direction. The paper describes some of the dynamic response measurements and discusses the observed strength of the structures in relation to planar limit analysis.

DOI:

10.14359/16899


Document: 

SP84-04

Date: 

October 1, 1984

Author(s):

J. Wight, V. Bertero, and H. Aoyama

Publication:

Symposium Papers

Volume:

84

Abstract:

Analyses are made to indicate how member strengths and reinforcement details used in the full scale reinforced concrete test structure compared to appropriate design requirements of the 1979 Edition of the Uniform Building Code (1) and current Japanese Building Standard Law (2, 3) and Architectural Institute of Japan Standard (4) . Comparison between the test structure and the design requirements of the Uniform Building Code indicate that even though the test structure was intended to represent a dual bracing type of structure, certain minimum strength and reinforcement detailing requirements of the Code were not satisfied . However, the provided member strengths and reinforcement details were considered to be sufficient to provide the needed dissipation of energy (through stable hysteresis behavior) to survive major seismic excitations without excessive damage. This was considered possible due to the relatively low percentages of longitudinal steel that we reused in the test structure and thus, only low or moderate shear stresses should be developed due to flexural hinging. The structural members were smaller and the reinforcement ratios were less than those normally found in a Japanese building of this size . Member capacities were considerably below that required in Japan and the ultimate lateral load capacity was approximately 65 percent of the required value.

DOI:

10.14359/16891


Document: 

SP84

Date: 

October 1, 1984

Author(s):

Editors: James K. Wight, James O. Jirsa, and W. Gene Corley

Publication:

Symposium Papers

Volume:

84

Abstract:

SP84 A joint U.S.-Japan cooperative earthquake engineering research program produced a series of papers published as 13 chapters in this volume. Included are: Static tests on shear walls and beamcolumn assemblies and study on correlation between shaking table tests and pseudo-dynamic tests; Construction and instrumentation of the full scale specimen; Comparison between the reinforced concrete test structure and design requirements from U.S. and Japanese Building Codes; Testing procedure and preliminary test results of a full scaleseven story reinforced concrete building; testing, repair and strengthening, and retesting of a full scale seven story reinforced concrete building; inelastic behavior of the seven story building; Analysis of the full scale seven story reinforced concrete test structure; medium scale wall assemblies: Comparison of analysis and test results; Full scale tests of beamcolumn joints; Scale model tests of Structural components and assemblies; and Earthquake simulation tests of scale models.

DOI:

10.14359/14041


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