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International Concrete Abstracts Portal

Showing 1-5 of 20 Abstracts search results

Document: 

SP81-01

Date: 

November 1, 1984

Author(s):

Roop L. Jindal

Publication:

Symposium Papers

Volume:

81

Abstract:

Tests were made on 44 beams to study the effect of steel fibers as shear reinforcement and to determine if there was any increase in the shear/moment capacity and change in the mode of failure. Span length of 30 in. (762 mm) was used for shear-span ratios (a/d) of 2.0 and 2.4, and 60 in. (1524 mm) for a/d ratios of 3.6 and 4.8. Steel fibers of 1% by volume were used in all SFRC beams. The variables were type of fibers, aspect ratio (l/d) of the fibers and the shear span ratios. Test results showed that shear and moment capacities of SFRC beams varied from 1.50 to 1.92 and 1.12 to 1.39 times, that of conventional reinforced concrete beam, respectively. Pbde of failure changed from shear mode to moment mode when SFRC was used. Steel fibers having aspect ratio of 75 or thin fibers were found to be most effective for increasing the shear capacity of SFRC beams. A design method has been suggested for analysing and designing SFRC beams. Theoretical results based on this method compare favorably with the test results.

DOI:

10.14359/6443


Document: 

SP81-08

Date: 

November 1, 1984

Author(s):

S. Hasaba, M. Kawamura, T. Koizumi, and K. Takemoto

Publication:

Symposium Papers

Volume:

81

Abstract:

This paper reports a few results of the experiments carried out in order to investigate the characteristics of deflection of the polymer fiber and the hybrid fiber reinforced concrete beams under bending load. Some results on the dynamic strength test for the polymer and hybrid fiber reinforced concrete beams by a Charpy impact tester modified for concrete specimens are also refered in this paper. The polymer fibers used in polymer fiber reinforced concrete are generally filaments with extremely small diameter. The fibers used in this study are relatively thick with the rectangular cross section of 2 by 0.6 mm. From these experiment, it may be found that the flexural strength of concrete is improved by the addition of the polymer fibers. The polymer fiber reinforced concrete beams showed great endurance after the initiation of cracks in the specimens. A method by a modified Charpy impact tester was proposed in this study for evaluating the resistance of concrete against impact load. According to the results obtained using this method, the resistibility of the polymer and the hybrid fiber reinforced concrete against impact load is about double that for fiber-free concrete.

DOI:

10.14359/6450


Document: 

SP81-16

Date: 

November 1, 1984

Author(s):

Robert G. Packard and Gordon K. Ray

Publication:

Symposium Papers

Volume:

81

Abstract:

The performance of most of the fiber-reinforced concrete pavement projects in the United States (34 projects built since 1971) are reported. These include experimental street and highway projects as well as more recently constructed fullscale airport pavements. While a few have performed well, many have developed defects early in their service lives. The lessons learned should help engineers to design future projects that will provide better service. Careful consideration, and perhaps additional research, is needed in the areas of joint design and spacing, load transfer at joints, fiber content, and thickness design.

DOI:

10.14359/6458


Document: 

SP81-07

Date: 

November 1, 1984

Author(s):

Antoine E. Naaman

Publication:

Symposium Papers

Volume:

81

Abstract:

This paper presents an overall evaluation of the observed behavior of fiber reinforced concrete under dynamic loading. The term dynamic loading is used to describe either high strain rate monotonic loading (impact) or cyclic loading under high stress range, high strain rates (simulating earthquake loading). Particular emphasis is placed on the evaluation of the fracture energy (or toughness) and fatigue life of this composite. The research program comprises four related parts dealing re-spectively with: 1) the effect of strain rate on the pull-out behavior of fibers in mortar, 2) the surface energy of fiber reinforced mortar prisms in tension, 3) the energy absorbed by fiber reinforced mortar beams subjected to impact loading and 4) the behavior in compression of fiber reinforced concrete cylinders under high strain rates monotonic and cyclic loadings. While Parts 2 and 3 of the program deal with steel fibers only, Parts 1 and 4 involve also glass, polypropylene and polyester fibers.

DOI:

10.14359/6449


Document: 

SP81-14

Date: 

November 1, 1984

Author(s):

David R. Lankard and Jeffrey K. Newell

Publication:

Symposium Papers

Volume:

81

Abstract:

Steel fiber reinforced concretes (SFRC) are typically prepared by adding the fiber along with the other concrete ingredients in the mixing operation. Using this "premix" approach, it is possible to incorporate up to about 265 lb/yd3 (2 volume percent) of fiber into the concrete. At fiber contents in excess of 2 volume percent, the SFRC becomes difficult or impossible to mix and place. Inasmuch as the improvements in concrete properties attributed to the fibers increase as a function of increasing fiber content, this situation places a limit on the ultimate property development in SFRC prepared using the premix approach. Recently, a procedure has been developed wherein steel fiber contents up to 18 volume percent have been provided in SFRC composites. The engineering properties of these highly reinforced composites are discussed along with a number of successful applications.

DOI:

10.14359/6456


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