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International Concrete Abstracts Portal

Showing 1-5 of 13 Abstracts search results

Document: 

SP80-10

Date: 

July 1, 1983

Author(s):

Armand Gustaferro

Publication:

Symposium Papers

Volume:

80

Abstract:

The author describes evaluations of structural damage caused accidental fires to buildings, bridges and outdoor industrial structure constructed of reinforced concrete, cast-in-place post-tensioned concrete or precast prestressed concrete. Techniques for evaluating structural damage include visual inspections, non-destructive testing, laboratory test of samples of steel and concrete, and load tests. Most damaged structure can be repaired by concrete restoration procedures, but it is sometime more economical to replace damaged portions of structures.

DOI:

10.14359/6594


Document: 

SP80-06

Date: 

July 1, 1983

Author(s):

U. Schneider, H. Bub, and M. Kersken-Bradley

Publication:

Symposium Papers

Volume:

80

Abstract:

Traditionally, requirements concerning structural fire protection are established from safety considerations based on an empirical or intuitive approach. Long years' experience generally results in acknowledged and presumably sound requirements for buildings with normal use. When assessing industrial buildings, however, the range of experience is often exceeded. Eventually, de-cisions on structural measures to be provided may be made on the expense of economy. This presentation introduces a probabilistic concept for expressing safety considerations in terms of tolerable failure probabilities applying to structural members subject to fire exposure. These probabilities are derived regarding the contribution of structural measures as well as fire fighting measures to the general reliability of structures liable to be exposed to fire. Eventually, the significance of structural measures - especially member design -vanishes, if fire fighting measures reduce the probability for se-vere fires to a negligible level. Two different design methods for proving compliance with reliability requirements derived on these premises are proposed. Application of the first method - based on heat balance calculations - is pref-erably confined to special structures and scientific studies. The second method - based on the equivalent fire duration - allows a simple individual appraisal of industrial projects with respect to the required fire resistance of structural members. Within this contribution, special reference is made to industrial buildings. However, application of this approach to other types of buildings is apparent.

DOI:

10.14359/6590


Document: 

SP80-02

Date: 

July 1, 1983

Author(s):

Boris Bresler and Robert H. Iding

Publication:

Symposium Papers

Volume:

80

Abstract:

The thermal and structural responses of prestressed concrete elements under ASTM E-119 fire test exposure were studied analytically. Comparisons of analytical results with experimentally recorded local temperatures and deflections for specimens tested by the Portland Cement Association showed good agreement. In addition, stress histories in concrete and in steel tendons and extent of cracking in concrete during the fire test exposures were determined analytically. Sensitivities in material characterization at elevated temperatures and other modeling uncertainties are discussed.

DOI:

10.14359/6586


Document: 

SP80

Date: 

July 1, 1983

Author(s):

Editor: Melvin S. Abrams

Publication:

Symposium Papers

Volume:

80

Abstract:

SP80 Today, with the public focus on fires in commercial buildings, this ACI book becomes must reading for designers. It's the full report of a symposium devoted to current advances in research and practice related to fire safety of concrete structures. Twelve major papers discuss: Analysis and Design of Buildings for Fire Resistance; Design Guidelines for Fire-Resistant Buildings; and Damage and Repair of Concrete Structures Exposed to Fire.

DOI:

10.14359/14037


Document: 

SP80-01

Date: 

July 1, 1983

Author(s):

T.D. Lin and Melvin S. Abrams

Publication:

Symposium Papers

Volume:

80

Abstract:

This report describes a five-phase test program. In Phase I, 13 small size specimens were tested. Included were flat plates, flat plates with edge beams, and ribbed slabs. Horizontal and vertical temperature distributions, expansions, and deflections were measured during heating periods. In Phases II and III, computer programs for heat flow cal-culations and stress analysis were developed. Subsequently, six 14x18-ft floor slabs were fire tested. During the tests, slab expansions in both directions were controlled to follow computed time-expansion relationships. Four more 14x18-ft specimens were fire tested in Phases IV and V to verify results of studies to develop methods of simula-ting realistic restraints in a fixed frame furnace through the use of pads made with compressible materials. Expansions and restraining forces measured when compressible pads were used were compared with those obtained for companion slabs tested in a furnace with hydraulically controlled restraining frames. The comparisons show reasonable agreement indicating that it is possible to use fixed frame furnaces to simulate realistic thermal restraints during fire tests of floor slabs.

DOI:

10.14359/6585


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