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International Concrete Abstracts Portal

Showing 1-5 of 17 Abstracts search results

Document: 

SP64-07

Date: 

July 1, 1980

Author(s):

G. B. Moore

Publication:

Symposium Papers

Volume:

64

Abstract:

Companion specimens of concrete made with Type I and Type K shrinkage-compensating cement were placed in andwhere they were exposed to the atmosphere approximately 50 percent of the time, and covered by seawater the rest of the time. Pulse velocity measurements made at intervals up to 9 years show no indication of deterioration. Specimens continuously exposed to the atmos- phere in the same location have somewhat lower pulse velocities, but show no deterioration..

DOI:

10.14359/6674


Document: 

SP64-16

Date: 

July 1, 1980

Author(s):

Yukikazu Tsuji

Publication:

Symposium Papers

Volume:

64

Abstract:

A method of estimating distribution of expansive strains produced in members of rectangular cross section with reinforcing bars arranged in any manner based on measured values of standard uniaxially restrained specimens is proposed. This method adopts the hypothesis that work performed by expansive cement concrete on restraining reinforcement is a constant value regardless of quantity and method of arrangement of reinforcement, and is a convenient met which does not include constants such as modulus of elasticity and creep coefficient of expansive cement concrete. Errors between estimated and measured values are approximately 20% at maximum, and the accuracy may be said to be adequate for practical purposes.

DOI:

10.14359/6683


Document: 

SP64-01

Date: 

July 1, 1980

Author(s):

Bryant Mather

Publication:

Symposium Papers

Volume:

64

Abstract:

The future of expansive cement depends on a realization by cement users that there are circumstances where the best cement to use is one that expands. If there is an awareness that it is the optimum product for certain uses then it will be made available and its future will be assured.

DOI:

10.14359/6668


Document: 

SP64-06

Date: 

July 1, 1980

Author(s):

H. G. Russell

Publication:

Symposium Papers

Volume:

64

Abstract:

This paper reports an experimental investigation to evaluate the performance of reinforced concrete slabs made with shrinkage compensating concrete. The effects of type of cement, type ofaggregate, percentage and position of reinforcement, slab thickness and curing conditions on expansion and subsequent shrinkage were evaluated. Measurements were made on 41 slabs. Flexural tests were conducted to determine the effects of the variables on cracking and strength. Generally, the level of expansion affected the cracking loads but had no effect on flexural strength. Final net shrinkage for slabs with shrinkage-compensating concrete was less than that for comparable slabs made with Type I cement. Creep tests were also conducted to measure the properties of shrinkage compensating concretes under constant axial load. The results were compared with data from similar specimens containing Type I cement. Initial deformations were predicted accurately usin the theory of elasticity. Measured creep of the slabs containing shrinkage-compensating concretes was higher than the creep of corresponding Type I slabs.

DOI:

10.14359/6673


Document: 

SP64-12

Date: 

July 1, 1980

Author(s):

Mark W. Hoffman

Publication:

Symposium Papers

Volume:

64

Abstract:

All concrete structures are affected by shrinkage and creep; post-tensioning introduces elastic shortening as well. This paper compares the effect of volume changes on structures using expansive cement concrete and conventional cement concrete. The primary focus of the paper is to show that the use of expansive cement concrete can minimize the induced moments created by volume changes. A structural example is used to compare these effects. A series of concrete bars tested for the amount of expansion that occurs in restrained and unrestrained conditions is discussed. A computer program used to perform a stiffness analysis on frames using sectional properties and displacement loadings (shortening or expansion movements) is described.

DOI:

10.14359/6679


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