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International Concrete Abstracts Portal

Showing 1-5 of 10 Abstracts search results

Document: 

SP260-04

Date: 

June 1, 2009

Author(s):

H. Ball Jr.

Publication:

Symposium Papers

Volume:

260

Abstract:

Typical demolding times of GFRC cast parts are typically 16 hours. This has limited the acceptance of GFRC, or any cement based product, into products requiring high volume production because of the high costs of multiple molds associated with a material chemistry with such long demolding times. This paper discusses a unique system utilizing Portland Type I cement, a fast setting cement and specially designed mixing equipment to process the material so that demolding times in the 1 to 2 hour range are possible. A conventional weight formula (128 pcf or 2048 kg/m3 ) and a lightweight formula (71 pcf or 1136 kg/m3) are available. For convenience, the formulas are supplied pre-blended.

DOI:

10.14359/56624


Document: 

SP260

Date: 

June 1, 2009

Author(s):

Editors: Yixin Shao and Ashish Dubey / Sponsored by: ACI Committee 549

Publication:

Symposium Papers

Volume:

260

Abstract:

This CD-ROM consists of papers that were presented at a session sponsored by Committee 549 at the Fall 2007 Convention in Fajardo, Puerto Rico. The objective of the symposium was to have a state-of-the-art review on the development of fabrication methods for cementitious products and explore their potential market opportunity in residential and industrial building applications. Note: The individual papers are also available. Please click on the following link to view the papers available, or call 248.848.3800 to order. SP-260

DOI:

10.14359/56604


Document: 

SP260-08

Date: 

June 1, 2009

Author(s):

R. Mott, W. Brameshuber, I. Hartung, and K. Dilger

Publication:

Symposium Papers

Volume:

260

Abstract:

Within the framework of an AiF research project, production methods for the serial batch production of building elements made of textile reinforced concrete were examined. The research work comprised the manufacturing techniques of laminating, casting, spraying and spinning as well as combinations of these methods. In the beginning the main focus was directed on the production and manufacturing technique with the adjustment of fine grained concrete and fabrics to the respective production technique and the development of spacers. Afterwards building elements were manufactured applying selected production techniques to be able to examine the entire manufacturing process of the building elements. The entire manufacturing process included the choice of the suitable production technique, the design of the building elements, the pre-confectioning of the fabrics, the production of the building elements as well as their testing and the discussion of the results. This paper presents the results of the research work. At first the production methods are explained. Afterwards the entire manufacturing process is exemplarily described for the production of spun concrete tubes as well as for elements of an integrated formwork.

DOI:

10.14359/56628


Document: 

SP260-09

Date: 

June 1, 2009

Author(s):

Y. Shao and S. Wang

Publication:

Symposium Papers

Volume:

260

Abstract:

Carbonation curing of cellulose fiberboard made by slurry-dewatering process was studied to examine their CO2 uptake capability, immediate carbonation strength and long term strength after subsequent hydration. Influencing parameters on CO2 uptake and strength gain were discussed. They included compact forming pressure, drying time, drying temperature, carbonation duration, fiber/cement ratio and water/cement ratio. It was found that cement bonded cellulose fiberboards had excellent carbonation capacity. The percent carbon uptake ranged from 13.5 % to 23.6%, based on cement content and process conditions. High degree of carbonation significantly improved early age strength and had no detrimental effect on the subsequent hydration strength. To promote more CO2 uptake and higher strength gain, carbonation rate should be controlled. This can be achieved through system optimization. Carbonation curing has shown the potential to replace traditional autoclaving and gain technical, economical and environmental benefits.

DOI:

10.14359/56629


Document: 

SP260-03

Date: 

June 1, 2009

Author(s):

K.G. Kuder and S.P. Shah

Publication:

Symposium Papers

Volume:

260

Abstract:

Extruded high-performance fiber-reinforced cementitious composites (HPFRCC) offer a number of benefits over the materials currently used in residential construction, including improved strength, ductility and durability, increased design flexibility, improved safety in the event of natural hazards and greater affordability. Despite these benefits, the use of extruded HPFRCC is not widespread in North America. Current extruded HPFRCC are difficult to nail, requiring excessive force to nail and often cracking due to nailing stresses. Research at the Center for Advanced Cement-Based Materials (ACBM), headquartered at Northwestern University, has focused on developing nailable extruded composites. Using a previously developed test method, the nailing performance of extruded HPFRCC was evaluated and compared with commercial products. Existing cavity expansion- and fracture mechanics- based models were used to determine the material parameters required for nailing. The results indicate that by tailoring both the matrix and the fiber reinforcement, nailable extruded composites can be produced. Nailable extruded HPFRCC have a reasonably low density and compressive strength (to allow for nail penetration) and a high fracture toughness (to resist cracking due the nailing stresses).

DOI:

10.14359/56623


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