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International Concrete Abstracts Portal

Showing 1-5 of 12 Abstracts search results

Document: 

SP190-05

Date: 

April 1, 2000

Author(s):

Hans W. Reinhardt

Publication:

Symposium Papers

Volume:

190

Abstract:

Panels were made of concrete and glass rovings for use as integral (or permanent) formwork for reinforced concrete. Extensive testing has been carried out in order to check bending strength, durability, composite action, and fire resistance of the panels either in the stage of the construction process or after completion of the structure. The test results are described and discussed. The final design of the formwork panel is presented.

DOI:

10.14359/5722


Document: 

SP190-02

Date: 

April 1, 2000

Author(s):

N. Banthia, C. Yan, and Aftab A. Mufti and Baidar Bakht

Publication:

Symposium Papers

Volume:

190

Abstract:

The steel free bridge deck slab technology has seen its real-life applications in a span of less than ten years from its initial conception. Indications are that more and more bridges will be built using this concept around the world, especially in places where corrosion of reinforcement is a serious concern. In this paper, results of an experimental project carried out at the University of British Columbia, where a full scale bridge deck was tested with carbon fiber reinforced cement (CFRC) permanent formwork, are described. The bridge deck had 0.4% of fibrillated polypropylene fiber reinforcement but no traditional steel reinforcement. The carbon fiber used in the formwork was a pitch-based fiber with a moderately high modulus of elasticity and tensile strength. The deck slab was tested at various locations under a simulated concentrated wheel load and the load vs. deflection characteristics were recorded. While the bridge deck failed, as expected, in a punching shear mode at a load several times higher than the design load, the bond between the CFRC formwork and the concrete deck was identified as a weak link in the system

DOI:

10.14359/5719


Document: 

SP190-09

Date: 

April 1, 2000

Author(s):

P. Soukatchoff

Publication:

Symposium Papers

Volume:

190

Abstract:

It is well known that glass fiber cement composites may suffer a loss of strength and toughness when exposed to natural environments. Even though buildings in Europe clad with GFRC panels have performed well for nearly 30 years now, this has restricted its use in certain circumstances because of a lack of confidence on behalf of the designer and specifiers. The loss of long term properties of GFRC is explained by two main phenomena: 0 The chemical attack of the glass fibers. 0 The morphological modification of the interfaces due to the growth of hydrates (Ca(OH)2 + CSH) which leads to em brittlement of the fibers in the matrix. The most widely used solution against the first type of attack is to use Alkali Resistance, AR, glass fibers with Cem-FIL being the original and Cem-FIL 2 giving the best long-term results. However, the way to obtain both constant flexural strength and ultimate strain (toughness) is to use both AR fibers and to modify the cementitious matrix in order to optimize the nature of the hydrate in the interface between the fiber and the matrix. Until recently, no totally satis-factory solution has been found even with the use of low alkali cements such as calcium sulpho-aluminate cement or portland cement with silica fume or flv ash. The CEM-FIL Star mix, developed by the Saint-Gobain group some 1 0 years ago, now has worldwide experience. It is based on using AR fiber with a specific type of the manmade, and therefore controllable, pozzolanic mate-rial, metakaolin, with a portland cement matrix. This reacts in a controllable way with the liberated lime, (calcium hydroxide), thus eliminating the main reason for the embrittlement of GFRC with time. By reacting with and re-moving this lime, long-term properties are improved.

DOI:

10.14359/5727


Document: 

SP190

Date: 

April 1, 2000

Author(s):

Editors: Alva Peled, Surendra P. Shah, and Nemkumar Banthia

Publication:

Symposium Papers

Volume:

190

Abstract:

SP190 The 11 papers in this Special Publication were presented at the ACI Spring Convention in Chicago, Illinois in March 1999, and represent worldwide advances in the development of high-performance fiber reinforced thin sheet products. The applications addressed include curtain walls, pipes, roof tiles, and repair/retrofit of existing structures. The manufacturing processes are discussed as well as the variety of natural and manufactured materials used.

DOI:

10.14359/14231


Document: 

SP190-03

Date: 

April 1, 2000

Author(s):

Yixin Shao, Ramesh Srinivasan and Surendra P. Shah

Publication:

Symposium Papers

Volume:

190

Abstract:

The effect of material constituents on the performance of fiber reinforced cementitious thin sheets was studied in order to examine the possible trade-off between cost and performance in cement-based building product development. A variety of materials were incorporated into fabricating cementitious thin sheets. The variables included types of fibers (glass, polyethylene terephthalate, polyolefin, or polyvinyl alcohol), types of sand (marble, silica or fly ash) and percent content, mixing method (dispersive or non-dispersive), latex types (MMA or SB), cement types (Type I or Type III), mineral additives (metakaolin or silica fume) and curing conditions (moisture or steam). Twelve batches of thin sheets with 3% fibers by volume for each were prepared by extrusion processing and three-point bending tests were conducted to evaluate the strength and toughness. The purpose of the study was to establish several mix designs for extrusion production of high performance fiber reinforced cementitious thin sheets at compatible cost.

DOI:

10.14359/5720


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