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International Concrete Abstracts Portal

Showing 1-5 of 13 Abstracts search results

Document: 

SP174-02

Date: 

April 1, 1998

Author(s):

George C. Hoff

Publication:

Symposium Papers

Volume:

174

Abstract:

This paper describes a large research project which was conducted to develop experimental data on composite structural elements consisting of a steel-concrete- steel (S-C-S) sandwich using headed studs to transfer shear within the composite element. This form of construction may be used as an alternative to either stained steel plate construction or reinforced concrete construction. The principal focus of the work was on marine structures such as arctic offshore drilling structures, tidal barrages, floating structures and submerged tube tunnels. Three distinct categories of structural elements were evaluated: cylinders, flat panels and curved panek’junctions. A total of 59 tests were conducted on large structural elements. The tests included composite cylinders under static axial, static radial and impact loads, flat panels under static in-plane axial, static out-of-plane bending fatigue out-of-plane bend, and static in-plane shear loads, and curved and junction panels under combined axial and bending loads. A 1: 10 scale was chosen for the cylinder tests and a 1:4 scale was used for all other flat and curved panels. To aid researchers and designers doing work on similar types of elements, descriptions of the test specimens, method of specimen preparation and test procedures are given in the paper. The experimental results will be available for release in 1998.

DOI:

10.14359/5958


Document: 

SP174-03

Date: 

April 1, 1998

Author(s):

Bingnian Gong, Bahram M. Shahrooz and Arnold J. Gillum

Publication:

Symposium Papers

Volume:

174

Abstract:

Adequate performance of coupled walls depends on sufficient stiffness, strength, and energy dissipation of coupling beams. To meet these goals, reinforced concrete coupling beams are often deep On the other hand, shallower steel beams can be used instead, and steel/composite coupling beams may be designed as shear-yielding members which have a more desirable energy dissipation characteristics. Such an option is not feasible for reinforced concrete beams. Well-established guidelines for links in eccentrically braced frames can be extrapolated to steel coupling beams. However, these provisions ignore the effects of concrete encasement which often surround the steel coupling beam. The reported research was conducted in an effort to till this void. Four one-third scale subassemblages of a wall segment and a coupling beam were extracted from a prototype structure, and were tested. The main test variables were the presence or lack of concrete encasement, and the number of web stiffeners. The encasement around the steel coupling beam increased the beam stiffness by 25%, and the shear strength by 18%. The additional stiffness enhances the level of coupling action which could lead into significantly larger wall axial loads, and would increase the demands on the foundation system. The increased stiffness needs to be incorporated in design. Although all the specimens could develop and exceed the expected capacities, the specimens failed due to less than desirable performance of the connection. Participation of the connection region towards energy dissipation became more substantial for the encased specimens, which is not desirable in view of post-earthquake repair. Connection design has to account for the increased capacity due to encasement, and details need to be improved to delay connection failure until plastic hinges in the coupling beam are fully mobilized. The encased specimens without any stiffeners performed as well as the specimens with stiffeners equal to or less than those required for steel link beams. No significant differences between the strength and stiffness characteristics of the encased specimens could be found. The experimental data suggest that nominal encasement is an effective means for preventing web buckling, and stiffeners are not needed. Current design codes need to be reevaluated for the cases where the steel coupling beam is encased.

DOI:

10.14359/5959


Document: 

SP174-10

Date: 

April 1, 1998

Author(s):

Subhash C. Goel

Publication:

Symposium Papers

Volume:

174

Abstract:

A five-year research program on Composite and Hybrid Structures as Phase 5 of the U.S.-Japan cooperative Earthquake Research Program was recommended to be initiated in 1993 in both countries. Presented in this paper is a summary of the research program which is based on a number of technical meetings of the U.S. and Japan Planning Groups and a Joint Planning Workshop. Because of diverse and broad scope of the subject area, the research program is organized into the following four groups: New Materials, Elements and Systems; Concrete Filled Tube Column Systems; Reinforced Concrete (RC) and Steel Reinforced Concrete (SRC) Column Systems; and RC/SRC Wall Systems. A theme structure with well selected layout, geometry and design loads for the research is also presented, which provides a common focus for various systems to be studied, and also a common prototype structure from which the components and sub-assemblages are drawn.

DOI:

10.14359/5966


Document: 

SP174

Date: 

April 1, 1998

Author(s):

Editors: Bahram M. Shahrooz and Gajanan M. Sabnis

Publication:

Symposium Papers

Volume:

174

Abstract:

SP-174 Innovative design applications and advanced research has led to widespread use of steel and concrete composite and hybrid systems in the construction of buildings, bridges, and many other types of civil structures. The state of the art in this field continues to move forward today. Extensive research programs and field testing have yielded efficient, reliable, and safe procedures, incorporating these two dissimilar materials for overall improved construction. This publication presents an overview of the latest developments in behavior and design of composite and hybrid structures. In 1995 ACI Committee 335 sponsored two technical sessions in Montreal, Quebec on the current practice of the composite and hybrid construction and the state of the art in the field. Researchers and practicing engineers from the United States, Europe and Japan gave presentations encompassing topics related to design and construction of composite and hybrid systems and the advancement of research in three continents. The twelve papers appearing in this volume include topics presented in Montreal, along with additional manuscripts. The breadth and depth of the material covered make this publication a useful resource to practicing engineers, educators and researchers.

DOI:

10.14359/14213


Document: 

SP174-04

Date: 

April 1, 1998

Author(s):

Gregory G. Deierlein and Roberto T. Leon

Publication:

Symposium Papers

Volume:

174

Abstract:

Existing design criteria for composite steel-concrete construction are fragmented among several different sources and are incomplete for some types of composite construction. This paper reviews the coverage of composite design provisions of major standards in the United States including the ACI-3 18 Code, the AISC-LRFD Specification, and the 1994 NEHRP Recommended Provisions for seismic design. Areas where design criteria is lacking or can be improved are discussed, and strategies for developing such information are proposed. Suggestions are made for where more coordination between the existing AISC-LRFD Specification and ACI-3 18 Code is needed.

DOI:

10.14359/5960


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