ABOUT THE INTERNATIONAL CONCRETE ABSTRACTS PORTAL

  • The International Concrete Abstracts Portal is an ACI led collaboration with leading technical organizations from within the international concrete industry and offers the most comprehensive collection of published concrete abstracts.

International Concrete Abstracts Portal

Showing 1-5 of 17 Abstracts search results

Document: 

SP168-13

Date: 

April 1, 1997

Author(s):

Shigen (Eric) Li, Gregory C. Frantz, and Jack E. Stephens

Publication:

Symposium Papers

Volume:

168

Abstract:

A test method, which uses pull-off test and partial coring techniques, was developed in this study. This test method is particularly suitable for assessing the durability of bonding new to old concrete subjected to freeze-thaw cycling and exposed to deicing salt. This test method also combines bond evaluation and ASTM C-672 test ( Standard Test Method for Scaling Resistance of Concrete Surfaces Exposed to Deicing Chemicals ) into one test method. Laboratory experimental research investigated important factors which influence the test results and their scatter. Test results show that this test method is very promising.

DOI:

10.14359/5944


Document: 

SP168-01

Date: 

April 1, 1997

Author(s):

Stephen G. Millard, John H. Bungey, Marcus R. Shaw, Cledwyn Thomas, and Brian A. Austin

Publication:

Symposium Papers

Volume:

168

Abstract:

Experimental work has been undertaken in the laboratory and on site to assist understanding and interpretation of the results of radar testing of structural concrete. This has included the development and use of a large-scale emulsion simulation tank in which a very large range of reinforcing steel and void configurations have been examined with field testing apparatus for a range of simulated concrete properties. A library of characteristic responses as well as limits of size and spacing upon successful resolution have been obtained. A large diameter co-axial transmission line has also been designed, fabricated and used to determine the fundamental electrical properties of a range of concretes and moisture conditions at frequencies from 1 MHz up to 1 GHz. Results have been compared with those for tests on larger concrete specimens with field testing apparatus and confirm the dominant influence of moisture compared with other aspects of the concrete composition. Frequency effects are quantified and related to characteristics of field antennas, and potential errors of using ‘typical’ values of concrete properties in interpretation and numerical modelling are identified. The test results from transmission line studies are compared with experimental and theoretical results from other research workers.

DOI:

10.14359/5940


Document: 

SP168-08

Date: 

April 1, 1997

Author(s):

N. A. Cumming and 0. S. Ooi

Publication:

Symposium Papers

Volume:

168

Abstract:

A major structural repair and strengthening program was undertaken at a large grain shipping terminal on Canada’s northwest coast. The work was required to correct problems of excessive cracking and internal delamination in the silo walls. During the repair work, it was necessary to survey 42 silos to locate zones of delaminated or deteriorated concrete. This was done successfully using the impact-echo procedure. This paper describes the impact-echo survey and its findings. It further discusses correlation of test results to actual conditions encountered in the field.

DOI:

10.14359/5955


Document: 

SP168-06

Date: 

April 1, 1997

Author(s):

Jiunn-Ming Lin and Mary Sansalone

Publication:

Symposium Papers

Volume:

168

Abstract:

Dilatational or P-wave speed in concrete is needed in impact-echo testing if the dimensions of structural elements or the location of flaws is to be determined. Previously the P-wave speed had to be determined from cores or from performing a test on a portion of the structure having known dimensions and no flaws. In cases where neither approach was possible, an estimate had to be made of the wave speed. This paper presents the details of a method for independently determining P-wave speed in concrete using a Rayleigh-wave speed measurement between two points on the surface. Such a procedure increases the power, versatility, and ease of use of the impact-echo method. In this paper the Rayleigh wave speed procedure is explained. Systematic errors involved in the measurement procedure areexamined, and the accuracies that can be expected using the procedure in conjunction with the impact-echo test procedure are discussed. Appropriate uses of the procedure are given, and the limitations of the method are stated. It is shown that the Rayleigh wave technique is an easy to use technique for estimating wave speeds. Typically, speeds within about 4% of the actual wave speed can be obtained.

DOI:

10.14359/5953


Document: 

SP168-14

Date: 

April 1, 1997

Author(s):

Xuli Fu and Il. Il. L. Chung

Publication:

Symposium Papers

Volume:

168

Abstract:

The contact electrical resistivity was found to correlate with the shear bond strength between steel rebar and concrete, between stainless steel fiber and cement paste, and between carbon fiber and cement paste. For the bond between steel rebar and concrete and that between stainless steel fiber (untreated or acetone washed) and cement paste, the contact resistivity increased linearly with increasing bond strength, due to an interfacial phase of high volume resistivity that helped the bonding. For the bond between stainless steel fiber (acid washed) and cement paste and that between carbon fiber (untreated) and cement paste, the contact resistivity decreased with increasing bond strength, due to the bond degradation by interfacial voids, which were high in volume resistivity. The acid washing of the stainless steel fiber decreased the contact resistivity, but had little effect on the bond strength. The high volume resistivity interfacial phase that enhanced the bonding between the untreated or acetone washed stainless steel fiber and cement paste apparently required for its formation the oxide layer on the stainless steel surface. The removal of the oxide layer by acid washing eliminated this phase, thus decreasing the contact resistivity and causing the contact resistivity to decrease with increasing bond strength. For a given interface at a given curing age, the correlation between bond strength and contact resistivity allows the bond strength to be nondestructively measured via contact resistivity measurement.

DOI:

10.14359/5945


1234

Results Per Page 




Please enter this 5 digit unlock code on the web page.