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International Concrete Abstracts Portal

Showing 1-5 of 16 Abstracts search results

Document: 

SP167-11

Date: 

March 1, 1997

Author(s):

Roberto C. A. Pinto and Ken Hover

Publication:

Symposium Papers

Volume:

167

Abstract:

This investigation was performed to access the applicability of conventional maturity functions to high strength concretes incorporating silica fume and superplasticizer. Concrete specimens were allowed to cure under three temperatures simulating hot weather, laboratory, and cold weather conditions. Both linear and exponential strength-maturity functions predicted different values of strength for different concrete curing temperatures for the same value of maturity, as has been observed by other researchers. Of these two unctions, the exponential performed somewhat better in this regard for elatively low values of maturity. Concrete strength-gain behavior was influenced by the presence of silica ume and the high amount of super-plasticizer in the mixture. Strength-maturity equations already developed for normal strength concrete underestimated strength at low maturity ages and overestimated strength at high maturity. It is suggested that further studies should be done to evaluate such effects in those relationships.

DOI:

10.14359/6289


Document: 

SP167-06

Date: 

March 1, 1997

Author(s):

C. E. Ospina, S. D. B. Alexander, and James G. MacGregor

Publication:

Symposium Papers

Volume:

167

Abstract:

Reinforced concrete columns are typically made with higher strength concrete than are the floor slabs that they support. In construction, the slab is usually cast continuous through the region of the slab-column joint. As a result, load in the column above the slab must pass through a layer of weaker slab concrete before reaching the column below the slab. The column-slab joint may be viewed as a “sandwich” column, with high strength concrete above and below a layer of lower strength concrete. In design, the effective column concrete strength is based on a special weighted average of the column and slab concrete strengths. Because of confinement, the slab concrete in the joint region is assumed to be capable of carrying stresses well in excess of its specified strength. This confinement is, in turn, affected by gravity loading of the slab. Existing design procedures are based on tests of slab-column joints in which no load was applied to the slabs. This paper presents the results of a series of tests on interior column-slab joints in which service level loads were applied to the slabs prior to loading the columns. The major conclusions of this study are: (1) tests of sandwich slab-column joints with unloaded slabs consistently overestimate the strength of the connection and (2) the AC1 3 18-89 provisions for interior column-slab joints are unconservative for high ratios of column to slab strength and/or high ratios of slab thickness to column size.

DOI:

10.14359/6284


Document: 

SP167-12

Date: 

March 1, 1997

Author(s):

Edward Francis O’Neil, Christophe Evian Dauriac, and Scott Keith Gilliland

Publication:

Symposium Papers

Volume:

167

Abstract:

A public-private partnership has been chosen to ignite the introduction of RPC into the United States construction market. This research and development project is being conducted under the Construction Productivity Advancement Research (CPAR) program of the US Army Corps of Engineers. The project was initiated in the fall of 1994 and it will run for three years. The program goal is to verify product integrity and gain industry acceptance and commercialization by developing and demonstrating the technical and economic viability of RPC for producing culvert/sewer pipes, pressure pipes and piles. T h e primary technology transfer has been completed, US component material source identification has been brought into action and material property verification has been initiated. Other US products development efforts have been initiated. These applications include : 0 0 spun cast concrete poles, impact resistant railroad ties and grade crossing planks.

DOI:

10.14359/6290


Document: 

SP167-05

Date: 

March 1, 1997

Author(s):

Joost Walraven

Publication:

Symposium Papers

Volume:

167

Abstract:

In order to enable rational and safe design with high performance concrete recommendations for this material are necessary. In the Netherlands an extended research program has been carried out focusing on aspects like behaviour in compression at various loading rates, shear friction in cracks, in-plane loading of cracked reinforced elements, splitting effects in the anchorage zone of prestressing strands, joints between precast columns, and creep. Furthermore trial casts have been carried out in order to get more experience with HPC at the building site. A four storey office building was completely built in HPC. During construction the temperature of the hardening concrete was measured at many locations, in order to investigate the development of temperature stresses and to get indications of the cracking probability. More-over a section of a box girder bridge was cast as an exercise for the construction of a 160 m span bridge in 1996. Both the labora-tory experiments and the site trials raised the confidence in suc-cessful applications of high performance concrete.

DOI:

10.14359/6283


Document: 

SP167-14

Date: 

March 1, 1997

Author(s):

Bernard Espion and Pierre Halleux

Publication:

Symposium Papers

Volume:

167

Abstract:

This paper reviews the ACI-318 Building Code requirements concerning the design of slabs post-tensioned with unbonded tendons. The design of a simply supported one-way slab is considered in detail. By taking into account all requirements (in service and at ultimate), it is shown that use of high strength concrete results in savings in the number of tendons or in slab depth when compared to a design in normal strength concrete. Tests up to failure of two similar two-span slabs, one in normal strength concrete (f'c = 40 MPa), the other in high strength concrete (f'c = 75 MPa I reveal a better ultimate load behavior for the high strength slab which exhibited more ductility than the normal strength slab. ACI requirements proved to be adequate for estimating the service load and conservative for predicting the actual carrying capacity.

DOI:

10.14359/6292


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