ABOUT THE INTERNATIONAL CONCRETE ABSTRACTS PORTAL

  • The International Concrete Abstracts Portal is an ACI led collaboration with leading technical organizations from within the international concrete industry and offers the most comprehensive collection of published concrete abstracts.

International Concrete Abstracts Portal

Showing 1-5 of 15 Abstracts search results

Document: 

SP166-04

Date: 

December 1, 1996

Author(s):

K. S. Rebeiz and David W. Fowler

Publication:

Symposium Papers

Volume:

166

Abstract:

Very little research has been done on the structural behavior of steel-reinforced polymer concrete (PC). In all the previous studied, it was generally assumed that the structural behavior of reinforced PC is similar to the structural behavior of reinforced portland cement concrete because both are composite materials consisting of a binder and inorganic aggregates. However, the design equations developed for steel-reinforced portland cement concrete yield very conservative results when applied to reinforced PC. The objective of this paper is to report on the shear and flexure properties of steel-reinforced PC beams using unsaturated polyester resins based on recycled polyethylene terephthalate (PET) plastic waste. The effects of the shear span-to-depth ratio, reinforcement ratio, and compressive strength were investigated with the shear beams, while the effect of reinforcement ratio was investigated with the flexure beams. New design equations were also developed to predict the shear and flexural strength of steel-reinforced PC beams.

DOI:

10.14359/1479


Document: 

SP166-07

Date: 

December 1, 1996

Author(s):

Miguel Angel Pindado

Publication:

Symposium Papers

Volume:

166

Abstract:

The use of porous materials as top layers of pavements is currently increasing in several European countries due to their noise absorption effect and an improvement in the drainage properties of the pavement. These effects are considered essential because of environmental and safety reasons. In this context, porous concrete is being studied as an alternative to porous asphalt. Since the porosity of this material significantly reduces its strength, some additions, in particular polymers, are required to obtain adequate mechanical properties and durability. These additions increase the cost of the pavement. To counteract this, the thickness of porous material is reduced to a thin layer; a bottom dense concrete, bonded to the porous top, must be laid. One such study was carried out by Dutch, German, and Spanish companies within the scope of a research project funded by the European Commission. This project included the analysis of noise production mechanism and noise measurement, the study of the behavior of porous concrete, the construction of test sections, the investigation of low noise by surface treatment, and the assessment and establishment of a practice code and guideline for the design and construction of porous concrete pavements. With respect to the laboratory research on porous concrete, the main objective was the definition of several mix compositions and a study of their characteristics of behavior. This paper presents the results obtained in the fatigue testing program carried out in this research project. It included compressive strength tests, the definition of the W÷hler curves (S-N diagrams) for several polymer contents and for different stress ratios, and the statistical analysis of experimental results.

DOI:

10.14359/1352


Document: 

SP166-09

Date: 

December 1, 1996

Author(s):

Johan Silfwerbrand

Publication:

Symposium Papers

Volume:

166

Abstract:

Industrial floors of asphalt concrete or other bituminous products are deformed under sustained concentrated loads. They are also dark in color and difficult to clean. Consequently, they need to be renovated. The use of polymer-modified concrete (PMC) overlays is an interesting alternative. Reinforced and unreinforced overlays were subjected to static and rolling wheel loads. Reinforced PMC overlays on asphalt showed a high load-carrying capacity. Shrinkage tests were carried out on PMC prisms and on concrete and bituminous overlaid with PMC. A two-layer overlay with wear and leveling layers was less prone to shrinkage than an overlay solely consisting of awear layer.

DOI:

10.14359/1402


Document: 

SP166-08

Date: 

December 1, 1996

Author(s):

Lou A. Kuhlmann

Publication:

Symposium Papers

Volume:

166

Abstract:

A new family of latexes has been developed for use in portland cement that has a minimum film-formation temperature (MFFT) well above working temperature, eliminating the two major drawbacks of latex-modified mixtures: formation of a crust on the surface and difficulty in cleaning tools. Instead of coalescing to form a film, as do the typical latex modifiers for portland cement, these latex particles maintain their shape as spheres. Of the several formulations studied, two are reported here: a styrene polymer and a methyl methacrylate polymer, both carboxylated. In addition to extensive laboratory testing of both polymers, two field trials with the styrene latex formulation were conducted. These laboratory and field studies demonstrated that film formation is not necessary for latexes to contribute to the performance of portland cement mixes. The data from these studies are encouraging, but also revealed that much more work needs to be done to fully understand the capabilities and limitations of this family of latexes.

DOI:

10.14359/1399


Document: 

SP166-02

Date: 

December 1, 1996

Author(s):

C. Vipulanandan, S. T. Mau, Syam K. Mantrala, and S. Wei

Publication:

Symposium Papers

Volume:

166

Abstract:

There is an interest in developing better performing (high strength and ductility) composite structural elements for construction and repair of onshore and offshore structures. In this study, composite structural elements that consist of filled columns and sandwich columns (two concentric circular steel tubes with polymer concrete sandwiched in between) were investigated as potential compression members. High-strength (480 Mpa) and low-strength (200 MPa) steel tubes conforming to ASTM A513 Type 5 and ASTM A500 Grade B, respectively, were used. The polymer concrete was polyester based with a compressive strength of 60 Mpa. Short composite columns, made of steel tubes of diameter-to-thickness ratios ranging from 16 to 170, were tested under monotonically increasing axial compression. It was observed that the composite columns had compressive strengths of 10 to 30 percent higher than that of the summation of the individual components. The ductility was much higher than that of the corresponding steel tubes. Relationships for predicting the initial modulus and peak load and corresponding strain of the sandwich column have been developed. A simple model was used to predict the load-strain history up to the peak load of the composite elements. The predictions agreed well with the test results.

DOI:

10.14359/1477


123

Results Per Page 




Please enter this 5 digit unlock code on the web page.