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International Concrete Abstracts Portal

Showing 1-5 of 56 Abstracts search results

Document: 

SP138

Date: 

September 1, 1993

Author(s):

Editors: Antonio Nanni and Charles W. Dolan / Sponsored by: ACI Committee 440 and Joint ACI-ASCE Committee 423

Publication:

Symposium Papers

Volume:

138

Abstract:

"The American Concrete Institute sponsored an unprecedented six technical sessions on FRP Reinforcement for Concrete at the Vancouver Conference on March 28-31, 1993. Speakers and attendees were present from Europe, Japan, Canada and the United States. The papers in this Special Publication are organized in the same subject areas as the conference. The subject topic areas and symposium sections are: 1. FRP Material Properties and Testing Methods 2. FRP Reinforcement for Reinforced Concrete 3. FRP Reinforcement for Prestressed Concrete 4. Analysis And Design 5. The Japanese National Project for FRP Development 6. Applications of FRP Reinforcement The 55 technical papers in this report represent the most comprehensive compilation to date of FRP research, design, and application information. A comparison of the papers provides an insight to the approach to the use and development of FRP reinforcement within the research communities of Europe, Japan and North America. The two symposium volumes are also significant because substantial portions of the extensive Japanese national research project have been translated into English. The Japanese papers provide an insight to both the magnitude of the technical work being conducted in Japan and the organization of the Japanese research program." Note: The individual papers are also available as .pdf downloads.. Please click on the following link to view the papers available, or call 248.848.3800 to order. SP138

DOI:

10.14359/14178


Document: 

SP138-32

Date: 

September 1, 1993

Author(s):

Asuo Yonekura, El-Ichi Tazawa, and Hideaki Nakayama,

Publication:

Symposium Papers

Volume:

138

Abstract:

Flexural and shear behavior of prestressed concrete (PC) beams using carbon or aramid fiber reinforced plastics (CFRP or AFRP) rods are investigated experimentally and compared with those using prestressing steel bars. Since moduli of elasticity of AFRP and CFRP are about 1/4 and 2/3 that of prestressing steel bars, respectively, the deflection of beams using FRP rods is larger and ultimate flexural and shear strengths of beams are smaller than those of PC beams using prestressing steel bars with similar tensile strength of tendons and web reinforcement. The ultimate flexural and shear strengths and deflection of PC beams using FRP rods are improved by an increase of prestress in beams. 229-493

DOI:

10.14359/3938


Document: 

SP138-48

Date: 

September 1, 1993

Author(s):

V.L. Brown and C.L. Bartholomew

Publication:

Symposium Papers

Volume:

138

Abstract:

In reinforced concrete pavements, dowel bars are typically used to transfer the load across the transverse joint from one pavement slab into the adjoining slab. Steel dowels have been used almost exclusively in these applications in the past. Because the bars cross construction joints, they are particularly susceptible to corrosion from the salts used for ice control. Corrosion can cause the dowel bar to fail or to freeze in the joint, resulting in pavement distress. As a solution to this problem, it would appear to be practical to fabricate the dowels from a material which is more resistant to corrosion from roadway salts than is steel. This paper presents the initial results from an investigation into the feasibility of substituting fiberglass reinforced plastic (FRP) dowel bars for steel bars in reinforced concrete pavements. FRP dowels are compared with steel dowels, both theoretically using a Friberg analysis and also experimentally through laboratory tests with scaled model slabs. It is concluded that the use of FRP dowels is feasible, provided that dowel diameters are increased approximately 20 to 30 percent.

DOI:

10.14359/10040


Document: 

SP138-33

Date: 

September 1, 1993

Author(s):

H. Okamura, Y. Kakuta, T. Uomoto, and H. Mutsuyoshi

Publication:

Symposium Papers

Volume:

138

Abstract:

Because fibers made of such materials as glass, carbon, aramid, and vinylon have very high resistance to corrosion, more attempts are being made to utilize continuous fiber reinforcing materials (CFRM) in reinforced and prestressed concrete structures instead of ordinary steel. However, CFRM are composite materials composed of millions of fibers and binding material, and have little plastic behavior. The mechanical behavior of reinforced concrete using CFRM is quite different from conventional reinforced concrete. As of the present, there is no general agreement relating to the methodology to be adopted in design or testing methods of such fibers. Realizing this problem, the Concrete Committee of the Japan Society of Civil Engineers (JSCE) organized a subcommittee on CFRM in 1989. The following results have been published as the committee report in 1992: design concept for concrete members using CFRM; test methods for durability of CFRM; concept for durability of CFRM; and a state-of-the-art report on CFRM for concrete structures. Paper describes the design concept for concrete members using CFRM.

DOI:

10.14359/4268


Document: 

SP138-14

Date: 

September 1, 1993

Author(s):

H. Nakagawa, M. Kobayashi, T. Suenaga, T. Ouchi, S. Watanabe, and K. Satoyama

Publication:

Symposium Papers

Volume:

138

Abstract:

The three-dimensional fabric studied as reinforcement for concrete is a stereo-fabric made of fiber rovings, woven into three directions, and impregnated with epoxy resin. Fiber material, number of filaments, and distance between rovings can be varied easily. Efficient production is also possible, since three-dimensional weaving, resin impregnation, and hardening can all be done by an automatic weaving machine. The authors investigated the flexural and fire-resistance behaviors of three-dimensional fabric reinforced concrete (3D-FRC) toward applying the material to building panels. The fibers studied were carbon and aramid, and the matrix was vinylon short-fiber reinforced concrete. The results demonstrate that 3D-FRC panels have sufficient strength and rigidity to withstand design wind loads, and the fire resistance of 60 min was achieved. The 3D-FRC panels have been used for curtain walls, parapets, partition walls, louvers, etc., and installations amount to 7000 m 2.

DOI:

10.14359/4262


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